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Meade 70mm Quad with Daystar Quark?

Accessories Astrophotography Equipment Filters Imaging Meade Solar
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#1 Tartarrsauce

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 11:42 PM

Hello all, 

 

I'm very interested in getting into Solar imaging, but I'm wondering about how the Daystar Quark would work with my scope. Most people I see using Doublets or Triplet with a Daystar, but would having a Quad make any difference in quality or would it not work with the Quark? I don't want to ruin my scope or my camera, so I'm just curious about this setup. I can purchase a M48 to 2" adapter for the Quark, so connecting the two isn't an issue. 

 

I'm really wondering about this config:

Meade 70mm Quad APO Astrograph

Daystar Quark (Chromosphere) 

(Maybe a reducer)

ZWO ASI174MM

 

I'm ignorant to Solar imaging, so go easy on me. 


Edited by Tartarrsauce, 04 August 2021 - 11:42 PM.


#2 briansalomon1

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 09:45 AM

It will work, and you will be able to view prominences but not much (if any) surface detail unless you stop the aperture down.

 

If you stop down to 50mm you can get f7 and it will show surface detail but a small, fast refractor is among the least ideal scopes for quark.

 

The main advantage of quark is that it gives you H-alpha for ~$1200 that can be used with large aperture.


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#3 Tartarrsauce

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 12:20 PM

The main advantage of quark is that it gives you H-alpha for ~$1200 that can be used with large aperture.

Is there a specific scope you'd recommend? I've been looking at cheap doublets or cheaper triplets ranging from f5.9 to f7



#4 wxcloud

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 12:56 PM

Think the quark is designed for f/7 and a bit higher focal ratios. I've heard the ar102 might be good but might also need an external erf? One of the pros here would give a better answer on that however.

#5 Tom M

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 02:03 PM

I use a Quark chromosphere with my ST80 on a regular basis for visual and it works fine for full disk views using a 24mm eyepiece. When I want more contrast I stop it down to 60mm, which changes it from f/5 to f/6.7. I can also use the 40mm stop built into the cover and push it to f/10 but it's a pretty dark image at that point.


Edited by Tom M, 05 August 2021 - 02:03 PM.


#6 briansalomon1

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 02:26 PM

wxcloud is right, if you're wanting to know which refractor there are a lot of variables and you'd best read up and familiarize yourself with the main variables before you buy anything.  Searching this forum for "best refractor for quark" is a good start.

 

For instance: You might not have decided if you're going to be purely visual, or may want to image. If you will be using a binoviewer (you probably will eventually) you'll want plenty of in-travel. If you're imaging you will want to make that part of the decision making process for choosing the scope because the camera performance is affected by the telescope.

 

Here's a link https://www.cloudyni...arch_app=forums

 

This is a cluster of telescopes one of the old-timers here uses to capture different image scales and it should give you an idea of how much there is to learn before you can make a good choice for an imaging telescope.


Edited by briansalomon1, 05 August 2021 - 02:54 PM.


#7 betacygni

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 05:11 PM

I would start with what you already have. I’m visual only, so these results might not necessarily apply if you plan to do primarily imaging, but I’ve found fast scopes actually work better than the longer focal ratios often recommended on this forum. So far my most consistent best performers are 60mm F6, and 80mm F5.

#8 hopskipson

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 10:20 PM

The Quark likes high focal ratio to narrow the bandpass and give more contrast.  I started off with a Quark and used it on my ST80 with and without masks and with a 102mm F/7 scope.  It's a great place to start into Ha solar observing and imaging. Most people will point you in the direction of a dedicated scope, but for an 80 or 100mm scope you'll pay thousands. Will it be the same? No, but it will get you some awesome chromosphere views for a reasonable price. If your seeing permits you can use it with a refractor up to 150 mm and get some amazing hi-resolution views. You will only need a UV/IR cut filter before the Quark for 80-150mm.


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#9 BinoGuy

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Posted 12 August 2021 - 10:30 AM

I'll just add one point for anyone who finds this thread in the future.  The light coming out of the Quark is a single, VERY narrow wavelength.  OP mentioned doublets and triplets but they really aren't needed here.  The purpose of those corrective lenses is to align the RGB wavelengths at the point of focus, as out-of-sync colors results in fringing.  Special glass likewise is partially to control unwanted light.

 

I have seen very nice images coming out of Quarks mounted on entry level 80mm scopes.  Both the the long tubes don't have fancy FPL glass or anything and I like the pictures I get.  If you have an old scope sitting around (the longer focal length the better for a Quark) give it a try, you might be surprised.  And please share with us so we can all learn.

 

 

Clear skies, BG  °¿°


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