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Are Taks available in UK?

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#1 Steve Napier

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Posted 15 May 2004 - 04:06 AM

I would be grateful if anyone could let me know if Takahashi 22*60s are available to buy in the uk? I contacted my local shop,Bonser"s in Newcastle and they said they cant supply that make.
I really dont want to buy them mail order.
Thankyou
Steve.

#2 sftonkin

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Posted 15 May 2004 - 06:38 AM

Yes. True Technology http://www.trutek-uk...hi/takbins.html are the UK supplier. the proprietor, Nick Hudson, is a pleasure to deal with. He's offering them with the BC&F Star-raker paralleogram -- its attraction for us is that it is UK-built -- in every other respect the UA mounts are more attractive, and Larry Patriarca of UA is also a pleasure to deal with (just got a T-mount from him.

#3 Steve Napier

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Posted 15 May 2004 - 09:20 AM

Thankyou Sftonkin. Thats good to know,it will take me a while to save up but,nice to know they can be bought in UK.
Nick"s review is very interesting saying that they EASILY beat the 20*100 Flourites! WOW! Is this true or mearly advertising hype? Thanks for your information.
Steve.

#4 sftonkin

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Posted 15 May 2004 - 10:40 AM

Nothaving had the pleasure of using the Taks (although I did give them a good inspection at Astrofest a few years ago) or the Miyauchi Apos (I have the non-apo version), I cannot say about the "beat". I imagine the "easily" is hype, but have no trouble accepting that they beat the Miya for false colour and for contrast. In his March 2001 S&T test report, Dennis di Cicco stated that, althought the image in his Fujinon 16x70 was brighter, he could see fainter stars in the Tak. It's also important to remember, when comparing light grasp, that the Tak has no vignetting (di Cicco stated this, and Craig has confirmed it) and that the entire FoV of the Miya is vignetted (i.e. it's not really a x100 -- I'll get around to evaluating this some day).

#5 777Guy

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Posted 15 May 2004 - 04:08 PM

Steve,
A few weeks ago I posted a brief report of my impressions of the Takahashi 22x60. I am very impressed with the little Taks. The image is absolutely tack-sharp and there was zero false color looking at Venus, a quarter Moon and Jupiter. I even had the chance to view them in bright daylight and again was amazed at how sharp and bright the images were.
To test the false color I focused on a metal barn a few miles away that had a very bright reflection, I could not get any false color on axis, off axis or to the extreme edge. If it weren't for the price of $1100 US I would have bought them on the spot with no hesitation. But I have heard that the Miyauchi Saturns produce similar views for a little less money and slightly more objective.
Cheers,

#6 Steve Napier

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Posted 16 May 2004 - 04:32 AM

Thanks guys. Im not really surprised you can see fainter stars in the Taks as opposed to the Fujinons as the higher magnification would allow this.
When people compare binoculars I get Very frustrated because they get too technical!
Instead of talking about all the various things I can"t spell!
Why dont the reviews concentrate on just what can be seen on a particular object,eg the Moon.
If you have 2 binoculars of 20 magnification and they are both pointed at the a given object on the lunar surface surely this would give a better recommendation to the buyer to decided.
I would get very frustrated when the big Astronomy magazines would do their test reports as they would be too technical.
Not enough straight head to head comparison.
Anyway thanks for your help,If I do decided to buy the Taks I will make sure to let you know how I find them.
Thankyou.
Steve.

#7 Silvio

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Posted 16 May 2004 - 07:12 PM

Steve,
I was out observing last night with my 22x60 Taks, and my observing buddy had his 20x100 Miyauchi Fluorites. I did some head to head comparisons. My findings:

- The Miyauchi's had a 45 degree eyepiece assembly compared to the Tak straight thru. This made it awkward viewing anything above 75 degrees with the Taks while the Miyauchi's handled high elevation viewing with ease.

- The Miyauchi's had a wider exit pupil and longer eye relief, both of which further contributed to a easier viewing experience. Views of bright extended objects such as Jupiter tended to twist and bend a little in the Tak if the eye placement was not exactly dead on, presumably due to the small exit pupil of the Tak's (2.7mm versus 5mm for the Miyauchi's). Both binoculars could not detect banding on Jupiter (images too bright?) but they both could resolve Saturn's rings; the Saturn views in the Tak's were sharper than in Miyauchi's.

- I got the impression that the Miyauchi's had a more depth of field for terrestial viewing, meaning that re-focussing was much less frequent. This is not relevant for astronomical use.

- The Tak's are much lighter and require a less sturdy mount than the Miyauchi's. This makes the Tak set up more transportable for 'grab-and-go' use. In fact, I keep my Tak's/tripod fully set up in my living room and I simply carry the entire assembly out to my back yard in one easy journey.

- The Miyauchi's gave slightly brighter views on deep sky targets, not surprising given the 3 times light grasp compared to the Tak's, but I must state that the difference in light grasp was not that greatly noticed. The Tak's won out easily on contrast - the background sky was much more darker in the Tak's versus the Miyauchi's, and this might explain why the Tak views SEEMED to be almost as bright as the Miyauchi's. In terms of what could be seen, I honestly did not find the Miyauchi's to be that much better than the Tak's. M81/M82 were easy in both, with the Miyauchi views being SLIGHTLY brighter. M57 was a difficult object in both. The comet and the Beehive looked IMPRESSIVE in both, with the Miyauchi's slightly edging out the Tak's in the brightness of the comet.

- Double stars were better resolved in the Tak's than in the Miyauchi's. In fact, I have split doubles of less than 7 arc seconds with the Tak's (although eye placement is critical to be able to do so). The Miyauchi's tended to show more flaring on the brighter stars, making tight double stars tougher to split. The Miyauchi's are f/5, I beleive, while the Tak's are closer to f/7 - this would give a sharpness edge to the Tak's, all other things being equal.

- The Moon can probably be streched to a tie (both give incredible lunar views), although I am sorely tempted to give the edge to the Tak's based on a sharper image and on better contrast - just Ta©k sharp!!

- The Tak's run around $1100, while the Miyauchi's run around $4,000, I think. I may be off on the pricing.


I am a double star fan, and I do most of my observing from my backyard. I find that the tightness of the star images and the 15 second set-up time to be exactly what I am looking for. Given my very specialised interests, I would choose the Tak over the Miyauchi's without any hesitation. The cost differential is an added (and not insignificant) bonus.

I also own a pair of Canon 15x50 IS binoculars. These were by far the best binoculars I have ever looked through until I looked through the Tak's and the Miyauchi's!!!! Both of these are way, way ahead of the Canon's. In fact, I had to relegate the Canon's to 4th place last night after looking through my friend's 8x40 (I think) Swarvorski $1100 roof prisms! Incredibly light binoculars with VERY SHARP views of the comet and the Beehive framed very easily in the same FOV!!

I just love binoculars!!!!!!!

Silvio.

#8 Steve Napier

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Posted 17 May 2004 - 03:20 AM

Silvio,thanks very much for that,I appreciate it. I was out myself last night too with my Oracle 3 which is an old televue refractor I was watching one of Jupiters moons shadow cross the disk,I pushed it up to 230 which is pushing it a bit for a 3" scope.
I love binoculars too,I mainly use my CZJ Deltritem 8*30s for everyday use,I use them a lot for hand held astronomical use too.
Those Taks are calling me more and more with each review I read.
Thanks very much.
Steve.


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