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If us oldies were just starting now as kids? Would light pollution stop us

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#26 unleaded55

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 06:01 PM

Sixty years is a long time in the modern world. Aside from basic human stuff, no one growing up today is experiencing a similar environment as someone growing up in 1961. 

 

Of course, any kid in 1961 was experiencing a wildly different world from that of someone growing up in 1901. I suspect kids in 2081 will not have much in common with kids of today, either. 

 

 

Again, the human condition is the same in all those times. But the external stimuli are very, very different.

You might think a world changed from 1961, but mine started in 1941; January 6th, in the Kopolanni Hospital, Oahu, Hawaii. I never new normalcy over the decade and found more pain in 1968-1973 in Vietnam Nam.  Then NYC 9-11-2001 happened. Everything and everyone was affected, world wide.  No peace for twenty years with our sons and daughters (brave souls) willing to risk it all.  So, I am hopeful that the next generations can view the celestial wonders in peace;  that leaves a legacy for their generations to follow.


Edited by unleaded55, 15 September 2021 - 06:02 PM.

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#27 starblue

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 02:37 AM

In rural Kansas in the 1950's my sister took me out into the inky blackness of night and showed me the constellations and, more importantly, the beauty, wonder, and mystery of the stars. I can't imagine that happening for 95% of the US population now. I see a very dim future for that part of hobby astronomy where you actually go outside to observe. If there are few to no stars to see, how will people get introduced to them? I can't see growing to love the stars through a computer screen. I don't think the hobby will disappear, but it will take forms that are unrecognizable to anyone living today--it will go virtual.



#28 bunyon

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 09:32 AM

You might think a world changed from 1961, but mine started in 1941; January 6th, in the Kopolanni Hospital, Oahu, Hawaii. I never new normalcy over the decade and found more pain in 1968-1973 in Vietnam Nam.  Then NYC 9-11-2001 happened. Everything and everyone was affected, world wide.  No peace for twenty years with our sons and daughters (brave souls) willing to risk it all.  So, I am hopeful that the next generations can view the celestial wonders in peace;  that leaves a legacy for their generations to follow.

I hope that, as well. 




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