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New Zeiss 20x60 Review......

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#26 MT4

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Posted 18 September 2021 - 04:11 PM

My wife and some of our neighbors plant milkweed so Monarch Butterfly caterpillars have something to eat so there will eventually be more Monarch butterflies!

 

Every optical instrument has it applications where it excels and I'm sure those that have the 20x60 quickly learn where it excels and enjoy it for those applications.  Its lack of really close-focus, narrow FOV, and weight would not make it a great all-purpose take-it-with you nature trail/hike binoculars.  But for more stationary observations of things nice to see at 20x and at least 35 feet away, I could see it as being nice.  I often tripod mount a refractor with binoviewer for insect and spider watching and with appropriate extension tubes can focus as close as 7 or 8 feet away.  I actually keep my refractor/binoviewer/extension-tube set-up and ready to use in my home office pointed at a spiderweb in my office corner for little "nature breaks" while I'm at work at my computer.  I just pivot my chair 90 degrees from my computer and peak through my binoviewers to see what my 8-foot away "office spider" is up to at 50x.  Sometimes I get quite a treat with watching it eat something! I also "cheat" with a bright LED spot-light which I turn on pointing at the spider.  Just because this set-up excels at this particular application, will all birders run out and buy refractors/tripods/binoviewers (and battery operated LED spot-lights)?  Probably not.   But I enjoy my set-up and I'm sure those that have the 20x60 enjoy theirs as well for how they use it.

 

That's a very interesting application of a 50x instrument at close range.   I'll need to figure out how to entice a spider to spin its web on my balcony so that I can pivot my home-office chair 90-120 degs to look at it through my Canon 15x50 IS during my little "nature breaks".  Sounds like it might be a lot of fun smile.gif


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#27 jprideaux

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Posted 18 September 2021 - 08:38 PM

That's a very interesting application of a 50x instrument at close range.   I'll need to figure out how to entice a spider to spin its web on my balcony so that I can pivot my home-office chair 90-120 degs to look at it through my Canon 15x50 IS during my little "nature breaks".  Sounds like it might be a lot of fun smile.gif

Note that as the object of study gets closer,  the focal point is pushed out farther.   The way I was able to focus really close with my refractor was to add a couple extension tubes (and also use a binoviewer that itself added another 100mm of light-path).  You can see how close you can focus with your binoculars.  To get any closer, you will need some way to move the eyepieces out farther.  It may or may not be possible depending on what you have.

The focus distance between infinity and close-up will be longer for higher-focal-length instruments.  That is why most binoculars with good close-focus are low power with short focal-lengths so the amount of focus travel between infinity and close up is manageable for standard focusers.  


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#28 MT4

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Posted 18 September 2021 - 11:07 PM

Note that as the object of study gets closer,  the focal point is pushed out farther.   The way I was able to focus really close with my refractor was to add a couple extension tubes (and also use a binoviewer that itself added another 100mm of light-path).  You can see how close you can focus with your binoculars.  To get any closer, you will need some way to move the eyepieces out farther.  It may or may not be possible depending on what you have.

The focus distance between infinity and close-up will be longer for higher-focal-length instruments.  That is why most binoculars with good close-focus are low power with short focal-lengths so the amount of focus travel between infinity and close up is manageable for standard focusers.  

 

I've read somewhere that the Canon 15x50 IS's close focus is about 13 feet.  The Maven B5 15x56's close focus is 10 feet according to the specs.   Between these two 15x instruments, I think I should be able to focus on any spider that decides to spin a web on my balcony smile.gif.  (My Nikon 18x70 and 82mm Kowa are way out of the game here.)

 

With the weather having been so bad in this part of the world lately, I've decided to branch out into bird watching and insect watching.   Spent some time this morning watching some birds in the park across from my balcony and it was quite an enjoyable experience.   Who knows, insect watching might be fun too smile.gif


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#29 Stevenkelby

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Posted 18 September 2021 - 11:43 PM

Do you have a papilio? They're mandatory ☺

 

They're the only binoculars I've ever used that show me terrestrial things that I can't see with my eyes.

 

For example, all my other binoculars show me the same things as my eyes can see, just closer.

 

The papilio for example shows me the actual pixels on my phone screen. 

 

They are basically long range microscope! 


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#30 MT4

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Posted 18 September 2021 - 11:51 PM

Do you have a papilio? They're mandatory ☺

 

They're the only binoculars I've ever used that show me terrestrial things that I can't see with my eyes.

 

For example, all my other binoculars show me the same things as my eyes can see, just closer.

 

The papilio for example shows me the actual pixels on my phone screen. 

 

They are basically long range microscope! 

 

Sounds like there's a real gap in my binocular arsenal.   It should be coming soon smile.gif


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#31 jprideaux

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Posted 19 September 2021 - 06:19 AM

Do you have a papilio? They're mandatory ☺

They're the only binoculars I've ever used that show me terrestrial things that I can't see with my eyes.

For example, all my other binoculars show me the same things as my eyes can see, just closer.

The papilio for example shows me the actual pixels on my phone screen.

They are basically long range microscope!


I also have the papilio and highly recommend them. They are very small, light, and inexpensive. To get the good close-focus effect with them, you need to get just a foot or two away from the subject. Some people even work out micro-tripods to hold them steady while they look at things close-up. Some things, though, might get scared off if you get that close or you may not want to get that close to. Or you may find a more relaxed viewing experience if you are sitting in a chair looking through some more higher power optics that can focus close rather than crouching down holding the papilio at an awkward angle. But, yes, get them if you are interested in watching bugs!
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#32 ECP M42

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Posted 20 September 2021 - 02:17 AM

Do you have a papilio? They're mandatory ☺

 

They're the only binoculars I've ever used that show me terrestrial things that I can't see with my eyes.

 

For example, all my other binoculars show me the same things as my eyes can see, just closer.

 

The papilio for example shows me the actual pixels on my phone screen. 

 

They are basically long range microscope! 

If you have the 8.5x model, you are transported to a virtual distance of only 6cm or 2.35" to the objects that the binoculars focus at 50cm or 20".

 

All binoculars that carry the user to virtual distances of less than 25cm or 10" could be considered "micro binoculars".


Edited by ECP M42, 20 September 2021 - 02:18 AM.


#33 osbourne one-nil

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Posted 20 September 2021 - 03:41 AM

All excellent stuff, but I think we should mention the 20x60s now and then to keep this thread on topic!


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