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Help needed to identifty a spot on Jupiter's equatorial band

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#1 HarveyDeckAstro

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 08:29 PM

So I imaged Jupiter on UTC 2021-09-15 from 1h29m to 2h30m. After processing the images today, I noticed a spot on the deep brown equatorial band on the northern hemisphere, as shown with arrows in the image below. It rotates with the Jupiter, so I don't think it is an artifact. The thing is, there was no such a spot at a week ago, as shown also in the image for comparison. It looks like that the spot newly appeared. Imagines were done with Meade 8", 2X Barlow, ZWO ADC.

 

I have imaged Jupiter only for a couple of  nights since mid August, so my experience is very limited. I would like to ask more experienced planet imagers if this kind of appearance of a feature common for Jupiter. After all, we are looking at the atmosphere. If so, what would this spot be? Perhaps someone has a clearer image of Jupiter at roughly the same time?

 

Harvey

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#2 D_talley

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 08:52 PM

It is not the spot that was hit by a space rock on Monday.  



#3 HarveyDeckAstro

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 09:21 PM

It is not. Damian Peach posted a really clear photo of the impact spot the day after and there was no trace of the hit at the impact site. Here I am just curious about what the spot in my image is.

#4 KiwiRay

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 09:29 PM

I usually look at images taken with larger scopes to confirm or see more clearly features in my own. Here's one:

 

https://www.cloudyni.../#entry11365179

 

Looks like an outbreak of some sort.  Nothing unusual, but worth watching to see how it develops.


Edited by KiwiRay, 16 September 2021 - 10:34 PM.

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#5 Achernar

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 09:40 PM

The last time I imaged Jupiter was on Sept. 11, and though my images weren't very good, the feature you got was not there that night. I think you caught some sort of outbreak, not an impact scar given I have seen the ones created back in 2009 and 1994. They didn't look anything like this feature.

 

Taras



#6 HarveyDeckAstro

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 10:21 PM

Thanks for these suggestions! It is clearly there in the more clean image from C11. Jupiter is interesting that it’s very dynamic. I was quite surprised by the appearance of the spot. Hopefully I can observe it more in coming days.


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