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Artifact in images

Astrophotography Imaging
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#1 mattronaut

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Posted 21 September 2021 - 09:45 PM

Hi all,

 

I have noticed that their is an artifact in my images. I have a hard time removing it in processing but it seems to be in my flat frames and light frames. It may be anywhere along the imaging train. Has anyone seen this before or have suggestions to remove it?

 

Thanks.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Screen Shot 2021-09-21 at 10.39.47 PM.png
  • Screen Shot 2021-09-21 at 10.39.57 PM.png


#2 TxStars

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Posted 21 September 2021 - 10:11 PM

Looks like amp glow or a light leak.

What is your scope/image train combo?

Does it move if you rotate only the camera ?



#3 jdupton

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Posted 21 September 2021 - 10:32 PM

mattronaut,

 

Welcome to Cloudy Nights!  I see this is your first post here.

 

   It is hard to tell but to me, it looks like a combination of a reflection from something in the image train and an off-axis aberration possibly due to collimation.

 

   It would help to know more about the telescope and optics in the path. If I had to guess, I would think this may be a refractor telescope with a compression adapter holding the camera and that you are using a filter of some sort. It may be a moderately aggressive LP filter or possibly a wider narrow band filter. If this is a refractor, the most likely cause of the off-axis nature of the flat would be a slip-in compression adapter flexing or a drooping focuser due to camera weight. That causes the appearance of miscollimation.

 

   Reflections between a filter and the camera window are common with some filters. You could try a few test shots without any filters (if you are using one) just to see if the concentric rings are less obvious in the flat. Drooping focusers using a compression adapter can be helped by finding way to use only threaded adapters for the camera rather than an eyepiece type of compression adapter.

 

 

John


Edited by jdupton, 21 September 2021 - 10:36 PM.


#4 andysea

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 12:44 AM

what camera?



#5 Tapio

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 01:20 AM

Not amp glow.

I vote for reflection.

Any flattener/reducer or filter which could be the reason.

Take them out one by one to find out.

And look for shiny parts in them.


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#6 mattronaut

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 05:20 PM

Thanks everyone for the comments.

 

I am using a 61mm Radian raptor refractor with built in 0.8x reducer flattener, (similar to sharpstar edph II), with the ZWO 533mc pro and the Optolong L-Extreme (2 inch) on a ZWO magnetic filter drawer.

 

I was reviewing flats taken with a UV/IR cut filter and do not see the same artifact.

 

Screen Shot 2021-09-22 at 6.11.44 PM.png


Edited by mattronaut, 22 September 2021 - 05:21 PM.



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