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The "Solar Explorer" project (Sol'Ex)

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#1 C. Buil

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 10:37 AM

Hi all,

 

The "Solar Explorer" is a self-made instrument from 3D printing. The aim of which is to make solar observation accessible to many amateurs and at low cost. You can observe the Sun surface by using light of hydrogen red line, calcium ultraviolet lines, helium D3 line... Doppler measure are possible and you can detect magnetic field (Zeeman) or trace of the solar corona out of a solar eclipse (advanced functions). Basically Sol'Ex is a compact spectroheliograph (it weighs less than 500 grams!).

 

Sol'Ex has already been produced to a large number of people all over the world, a small sample:

 

annonce_solex_1.jpg

 

You can use it with a simple photographic telephoto lens, a small 2-inch refractor or larger instruments ... Here the solar limbs observed by using a one- meter focal length refractor (5-inch AstroPhysics):

 

annonce_solex_2.jpg

 

The construction and use are described on the website: http://www.astrosurf...ntation-en.html

I am pleased to announce that a new version of the improved specific optics kit is just available today, and can be ordered from Shelyak Instruments: http://www.astrosurf...ontacts-en.html

 

Sol'Ex can be transformed into a powerfullstellar spectrograph (Star'Ex), can be used to measure your filters transmission and many more. It is a simple, flexible and efficient instrument (0.30 A band pass at H-alpha, give high contrasted images of sun surface).

 

It is also an educational project and a great experience to live concerning a large community of amateurs astronomer!

 

Christian Buil


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#2 MalVeauX

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 10:47 AM

Fantastic, I've been wanting to build my own D-SHG, the idea of being able to 3D print it is really great. Will be watching this.

 

And this is absolutely an awesome educational tool; the ability to study our star in virtually any significant wavelength with a single instrument is a big deal and opens so many doors.

 

waytogo.gifbow.gif

 

Very best,



#3 BinoGuy

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 11:44 AM

Hullo,

 

I have been performing a lot of solar outreach lately with the club, including several hours last Friday for 232 campers*.  Since we aren't sharing eyepieces right now everything is via camera anyway.  I think the solar explorer would be a nice addition to our options.  

 

I have never built my own optical system.  Can either of you provide some insight on how much work the construction & assembly of the might entail?  I'm guessing less than 10 hours, excluding printing.  Is this optical-level assembly or can anyone with intermediate skills (we have a couple of machinists in the club) do this?  

 

 

*about an hour after we switched over to look at the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn we were treated to an ISS transit above all three, and with all panels shining brightly.

 

 

Cheers and clear skies!  BinoGuy   °¿°



#4 MalVeauX

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 12:31 PM

Hullo,

 

I have been performing a lot of solar outreach lately with the club, including several hours last Friday for 232 campers*.  Since we aren't sharing eyepieces right now everything is via camera anyway.  I think the solar explorer would be a nice addition to our options.  

 

I have never built my own optical system.  Can either of you provide some insight on how much work the construction & assembly of the might entail?  I'm guessing less than 10 hours, excluding printing.  Is this optical-level assembly or can anyone with intermediate skills (we have a couple of machinists in the club) do this?  

 

 

*about an hour after we switched over to look at the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn we were treated to an ISS transit above all three, and with all panels shining brightly.

 

 

Cheers and clear skies!  BinoGuy   °¿°

It's actually pretty simple, it's mostly just getting the parts and measuring some distances and angles. Lots of these are put together with glue and cardboard.

 

I started with a book to learn about the principles and construction from basic parts that can be mostly harvested commonly, by Ken Harrison:

 

https://www.amazon.c...3319248723/ref=

 

Very best,
 


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