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Taking care of binoculars

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#1 MT4

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 08:21 PM

I think I am doing a reasonable job taking care of my binoculars.  That said, I'd like to tap into the vast body of knowledge and experience of this forum's members, so I am sharing what I am doing and would like to hear your feedback and suggestions.

 

1.  Storage:

My binoculars, when not in use, are stored away in moisture-proof boxes.  One of the boxes already has a built-in dehumidifier but I've put some desiccant packs in there anyway for extra protection against moisture.

 

When stored away, my binos are never in their original cases.  In fact, I don't use any of the original cases other than when taking some of my binoculars with me on short trips.  When walking around town, I simply put my binos in a small shoulder bag.  (It's a Manfrotto camera bag that doesn't look like a camera bag, and that holds a special appeal for me.)

 

My Canon 15x50 IS is always stored horizontally.  (I've read a tip on CN that storing Canon IS binos horizontally can help keep the IS artifacts at bay.   I am sure there's at the very least some truth to this as the tip comes from a very experienced CN member whose opinions and tips I highly respect and have greatly benefitted from.   In any case, with the moisture-proof boxes that I have, it's way easier to store my Canon horizontally than to do so vertically, so there's no room for any debate here smile.gif)

 

To prevent battery leakage in my Canon IS bino, I take the batteries out of the Canon every few days to recharge them using a Panasonic battery charger.  (I have a 4-pack Panasonic Eneloop Pro and these Eneloop batteries work great with my Canon IS.)

 

2.  UV-C sterilization:

My used Canon 15x50 IS arrived a couple of months ago in very good condition other than a small mold somewhere inside one of the eyepieces.  This doesn't seem to impact the view in any way, but I've bought a UV-C sterilizer and put the Canon in there for a 20-30 min UV-C treatment every week to make sure that the mold does not spread.  In addition, I've given the Canon the sunlight treatment multiple times to be doubly-sure that the mold is well and truly dead.

 

I've also given my other binos the same UV-C treatment for good measure.

 

3. Cooling down binoculars before use:

I've noticed that with my low-powered binos, which are in the 30mm and 40mm aperture classes, there's hardly any need to cool them down before use.  Just take them out of their moisture-proof boxes and they seem to be instantly ready for action.

 

The same appears to hold true for my 50mm aperture class binos, though I've learned to give them some 5 minutes to acclimatize first, for best results.

 

I give my Nikon 18x70 some 10 mins before first use.  The cool down period for my 82mm Kowa is a bit longer, at 30 mins or so.

 

I've heard that when cooling down binos, it's not necessary to take the objective/eyepiece covers off.  The optics are better protected that way.

 

What I typically do in an observing session is to use my lower-powered, smaller-objective binos first to get macro views of the night sky.  By the time I am ready for close-up studies, the bigger binos are about ready.

 

4.  Packing up after use:

I never keep my optics outside over night, leaving them exposed to the elements.  They always go back in their respective moisture-proof boxes after use each night.

 

5.  Optics cleaning:

I've made some costly mistakes when cleaning my optics.  I used to clean my optics obsessively after pretty much each session, introducing cleaning marks to some of my prized optics.

 

The optics cleaning procedure that I go by nowadays is the one nicely written up at:

https://www.cloudyni.../#entry11264829

 

What I haven't yet figured out is when and how often to do the cleaning.  Should that be once a week, e.g. every Sun morning?

 

Do you do any cleaning at all after using your binoculars before packing them up for the night?

 

Would love to hear from you all.  Thank you.


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#2 PKDfan

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 08:49 PM

Hi MT4! I only clean my optics when they absolutely need it, which is practically never.

For any dust accumulation I use a blower to remove them then wrapped in plastic bags.

I live in a dry climate so user beware if yours include high humidity.

My 10×42 & 12×40 require zero cooldown.

I have used these for 10 years and they look like new especially my ZOMZ2 Russian bins which are from 1977.



Clear skies & Good seeing
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#3 Stevenkelby

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:20 PM

I inspect objectives and oculars after most uses but very rarely clean. Generally blowing with air is enough for me. 

 

If the oculars are too greasy I'll clean with a lens pen.

 

I've never felt like I need to clean objectives unless they got rained on or something. 


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#4 KaterinBortle9

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:21 PM

Agree with PKDfan, I only clean them when there is a noticeable large smear or fingerprint mainly using RO/distilled water with cotton buds (use lens cleaning fluid if too oily). Customary blowing of dust of with blower when back at home, cool down and into the dry box when cleaning not required. Since I only have a pair of bino and a little scope, hopefully my weekly uses keeps the fungus and mold away. 


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#5 TOMDEY

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:22 PM

I have many premium binos, use them a lot, and on average never touch or clean the optics.  It's not that I'm afraid to --- it's just that they rarely, if ever --- need it! If I notice that an outer surface needs cleaning, I just do it and know how... very easy. Some (many) beginners obsessively clean their lenses as if they are eyeglasses or something --- not a good idea and more likely to lead to premature failure.    Tom


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#6 MT4

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:32 PM

I have many premium binos, use them a lot, and on average never touch or clean the optics.  It's not that I'm afraid to --- it's just that they rarely, if ever --- need it! If I notice that an outer surface needs cleaning, I just do it and know how... very easy. Some (many) beginners obsessively clean their lenses as if they are eyeglasses or something --- not a good idea and more likely to lead to premature failure.    Tom

 

You described me as of a few months ago to a T.   I was obsessively cleaning my optics as if they were my eyeglasses until I made some costly mistakes and learned a valuable lesson.

 

Now I only use an air blower for the most part.



#7 MT4

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:34 PM

Agree with PKDfan, I only clean them when there is a noticeable large smear or fingerprint mainly using RO/distilled water with cotton buds (use lens cleaning fluid if too oily). Customary blowing of dust of with blower when back at home, cool down and into the dry box when cleaning not required. Since I only have a pair of bino and a little scope, hopefully my weekly uses keeps the fungus and mold away. 

 

Is cooling down needed before putting binos into a dry box?   I've never done this step.  Just pack up and immediately put my binos back into their respective dry boxes.



#8 MT4

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:40 PM

Hi MT4! I only clean my optics when they absolutely need it, which is practically never.

For any dust accumulation I use a blower to remove them then wrapped in plastic bags.

I live in a dry climate so user beware if yours include high humidity.

My 10×42 & 12×40 require zero cooldown.

I have used these for 10 years and they look like new especially my ZOMZ2 Russian bins which are from 1977.



Clear skies & Good seeing

 

This is the second time in two days that I've heard of the idea of wrapping binos in plastic bags.  What is the purpose of doing so?   Thank you.



#9 KaterinBortle9

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:42 PM

Is cooling down needed before putting binos into a dry box?   I've never done this step.  Just pack up and immediately put my binos back into their respective dry boxes.

By cooling down I meant taking them out of the camera bag and let them have a little R&R on the table/bed after a hot day in the sun. lol.gif


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#10 MT4

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 09:45 PM

I inspect objectives and oculars after most uses but very rarely clean. Generally blowing with air is enough for me. 

 

If the oculars are too greasy I'll clean with a lens pen.

 

I've never felt like I need to clean objectives unless they got rained on or something. 

 

I have a lens pen and it was with this pen that I made some cost mistakes early this year.  I managed to introduce some small scratches to the ocular lenses of some of my binos.  Since then, my optics cleaning note has had this to say about lens pens:   "Stay away from lens pens as it's way too easy to scratch the optics."

 

I've read that with a lens pen, one should only use the fine brush to gently brush off any dust.


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#11 ihf

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Posted 22 September 2021 - 10:27 PM

I have put short spacers (lens shields) on the objectives of my Canon binos. This protects a little from stray light, but mostly from touching the lenses by accident. I do not clean binos, basically ever. If I need to a Zeiss wipe or Isopro for the lenses.

 

Most binos have a dedicated case. I take them out for observing and put them back after. My climate is fairly dry. Also outside it is usually cooler then inside. So I close the case before entering the house. That avoids dew. Also it lowers relative humidity. I recently got silica gel just in case. I am sure in a tropical climate drying/storing when entering a house may need a different approach.

 

The cases are a bit obsessive. But this allows me to put them into my car mixed with camping/backpacking stuff and heavy gallons of water and not worry. In general I get tight fitting cases. They have to protect against water, dust, deformation by heavy items - not throwing across the room.

 

Experience with desert dust made me order a fancier smaller telescope cover. But simple trash bags do work to protect binos on a tripod until it gets dark.


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#12 PKDfan

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 01:08 AM

This is the second time in two days that I've heard of the idea of wrapping binos in plastic bags. What is the purpose of doing so? Thank you.


Hi MT4, I am actually as obsessive/compulsive a person as the person who obsessively cleans, I just transmute that into preventative measures.

This includes placing ALL my glass, eyepieces, or objectives of my refractor and binoculars in tbeir caps immediately after use with them placed in tightly wrapped plastic bags with a blower clean after they acclimate, so before next use.

Usually I have to do nothing but the rocket air blaster to keep them in like new condition.

Having them in tightly wrapped plastic bags helps reduce any migration of unwanted particles onto the surfaces of the glass while also mitigating any potential moisture entry, or other unwanted things like bugs.

In many years of use my bins are in like new condition, exactly like my two year old 4" apo and its oculars.

I notice a few dust particles on my most used eyepieces only after several uses so a quick blast of air keeps the view as pure as possible.

I Iike to always maximize contrast in my observing so having clean optics utilizes everything my optics are capable of.
After all I've only got four inches of aperture to play with!

Hope that clarifies things for you if not please keep asking questions!

Clear skies & Good seeing
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#13 MT4

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 01:27 AM

Tokyo is technically outside of the tro

 

Hi MT4, I am actually as obsessive/compulsive a person as the person who obsessively cleans, I just transmute that into preventative measures.

This includes placing ALL my glass, eyepieces, or objectives of my refractor and binoculars in tbeir caps immediately after use with them placed in tightly wrapped plastic bags with a blower clean after they acclimate, so before next use.

Usually I have to do nothing but the rocket air blaster to keep them in like new condition.

Having them in tightly wrapped plastic bags helps reduce any migration of unwanted particles onto the surfaces of the glass while also mitigating any potential moisture entry, or other unwanted things like bugs.

In many years of use my bins are in like new condition, exactly like my two year old 4" apo and its oculars.

I notice a few dust particles on my most used eyepieces only after several uses so a quick blast of air keeps the view as pure as possible.

I Iike to always maximize contrast in my observing so having clean optics utilizes everything my optics are capable of.
After all I've only got four inches of aperture to play with!

Hope that clarifies things for you if not please keep asking questions!

Clear skies & Good seeing

 

That's perfectly clear.   Thank you very much for the clarification.

 

I am hearing loud and clear in this thread that obsessively cleaning optics is a bad idea.  Using an air blower is a good approach for keeping dust particles at bay since it doesn't directly touch any glass surfaces.

 

I have OCD too by the way.  I've just learned to dial back on cleaning my optics after making a few costly mistakes.  It took me a few days to get over the fact that some of my otherwise-pristine binos had some small scratches on the ocular lenses and some cleaning marks on the objective lenses.  Fortunately, there's no perceivable impact to the views.


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#14 MT4

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 01:39 AM

I have put short spacers (lens shields) on the objectives of my Canon binos. This protects a little from stray light, but mostly from touching the lenses by accident. I do not clean binos, basically ever. If I need to a Zeiss wipe or Isopro for the lenses.

 

Most binos have a dedicated case. I take them out for observing and put them back after. My climate is fairly dry. Also outside it is usually cooler then inside. So I close the case before entering the house. That avoids dew. Also it lowers relative humidity. I recently got silica gel just in case. I am sure in a tropical climate drying/storing when entering a house may need a different approach.

 

The cases are a bit obsessive. But this allows me to put them into my car mixed with camping/backpacking stuff and heavy gallons of water and not worry. In general I get tight fitting cases. They have to protect against water, dust, deformation by heavy items - not throwing across the room.

 

Experience with desert dust made me order a fancier smaller telescope cover. But simple trash bags do work to protect binos on a tripod until it gets dark.

 

Tokyo is technically speaking not in the tropical zone but humidity (and heat too) is awfully bad from mid spring right through summer and then some.  I got a good chuckle seeing how AccuWeather.com labels Tokyo's humidity level most days this summer as "dangerously high", as if could it kill.   AccuWeather isn't wrong as the combination of heat and humidity does kill a number of people here every summer.  Speaking of which, it's now over and fall is much much nicer here.


Edited by MT4, 23 September 2021 - 01:40 AM.

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#15 ihf

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 03:35 AM

It took me a few days to get over the fact that some of my otherwise-pristine binos had some small scratches on the ocular lenses and some cleaning marks on the objective lenses.  Fortunately, there's no perceivable impact to the views.

If it helps. One of my hobbies is sharpening knives. That makes me appreciative of different material hardnesses, of which I have collected different samples. Hardness is when one mineral leaves a groove in another. Glass is somewhere around Mohs 5.5-6. Sand tends to be just a little more. So sand blown over glass will scratch it. Not sure where coatings stand. But yes, I have had little accidents with abrasive transfers. I do like diamonds. I think diamonds are a boys best friends too. But boy, do they leave deep scratches against anything (semi-)hard. And yes, putting a small diamond plate into the the same pocket as an Iphone is not smart. The existence of hard particles in my home makes me think twice before trying to "clean" optics. Catching even a single hard grain and rolling it around a lens would be a recipe for unhappiness. So it is very important to always use fresh medium for cleaning. (There are really good tips on cleaning in the eyepiece forum.) The good news though is that all the inside surfaces of your binos are still pristine. Also a few scratches on a surface don't really matter. Now the fun connecting part between the hobbies is that some folks grind their own mirrors or lenses. Instead of sharpening/polishing knives they create perfect spheres. Sounds difficult, but is just math - rub two rocks together and they want to become perfectly(!) spherical. (For a flat one needs to alternate three rocks.) The light needs a perfect sphere to focus. A small deviation of the surface shape is a big problem. But! Scratches are not, as long as they are just a few. A tiny bit of the light will scatter randomly and hopefully never reach the eye.


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#16 MT4

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 05:33 AM

If it helps. One of my hobbies is sharpening knives. That makes me appreciative of different material hardnesses,

That’s a pretty impressive hobby.  Is it not safe where you are?  smile.gif



#17 ayadai

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 06:02 AM

To prevent battery leakage in my Canon IS bino, I take the batteries out of the Canon every few days to recharge them using a Panasonic battery charger.  (I have a 4-pack Panasonic Eneloop Pro and these Eneloop batteries work great with my Canon IS.)

FWIW, I've used eneloops exclusively for many, many years, including in outdoor devices, like sensors for weather stations. The other day, I found a decommissioned anemometer that had been sitting outside for 2-3 years. When I opened the case, I found the 2 eneloop AA batteries installed when it was last used. There were a bit rusty on the ends, but no leakage. I've never had an eneloop battery leak.

 

You're on the right track with the boxes and dehumdifiers. For astro gear, I use heavy duty plastic crates with weatherstripping on the lid interface, and an EvaDry E-333 inside of each one.


Edited by ayadai, 23 September 2021 - 06:03 AM.

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#18 tmichaelbanks

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:23 AM

When I use binoculars for more than 5-10 minutes in the colder weather, I place them in large "Ziploc" freezer bags before I bring them into the house.  Once inside, I usually let them sit until the next morning.  I've found that this prevents condensation on the glass from the abrupt temperature and humidity changes from coming inside.  I do the same for telescope eyepieces.

 

Regarding cleaning binocular optics, I rarely have a need to clean objective lenses but I do occasionally.  Daytime use in rainy conditions or use while kayaking typically spots up all the lenses, sometimes leaving salt residue.  I do wind up cleaning the eyepieces periodically due to eyelash grease and occasional fingerprints (having to wear eyeglasses while observing means the eye cups are always in the down position).  Spots on the eyepiece lenses do interfere with the view noticeably, but it doesn't seem to make much differences on the objective lenses.  I don't like leaving salty residue on lens surfaces for fear of damaging the lens coatings.

 

To clean any lenses, I use a blower to remove dust and a Lenspen brush to sweep away particles that are not stuck but won't blow away.  I then apply isopropyl alcohol with a Q-tip and finish off by blowing my breath on the lens and cleaning up with a fresh Q-tip.  This seems to work consistently for me.  I don't use the charcoal impregnated Lenspen tips, as I've noticed they do leave a residue.


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#19 ivansky

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:50 AM

I always put bags of desiccant in my binoculars storage cases.
If dessicant is not available, I use small bags of rice instead which work wonderfully.


Edited by ivansky, 23 September 2021 - 09:51 AM.

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#20 MT4

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 10:36 AM

When I use binoculars for more than 5-10 minutes in the colder weather, I place them in large "Ziploc" freezer bags before I bring them into the house.  Once inside, I usually let them sit until the next morning.  I've found that this prevents condensation on the glass from the abrupt temperature and humidity changes from coming inside.  I do the same for telescope eyepieces.

Thank you very much for this tip.

 

I did notice the condensation issue on a couple of occasions last winter.  I had no idea what to do with it at the time. Fortunately it went away quickly and didn’t seem to cause any lasting damage.  
 

Will buy ziploc bags.  

 

 

P.S.  My large-sized ziploc bags are coming soon.  When taking my binos on walks around town or on short trips, I'll put them in a ziploc bag and then put the bag in my shoulder bag.   Extra protection against the elements and especially the high humidity level here.   Thanks again for the tip!


Edited by MT4, 24 September 2021 - 03:05 AM.


#21 MT4

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 10:41 AM

I always put bags of desiccant in my binoculars storage cases.
If dessicant is not available, I use small bags of rice instead which work wonderfully.

I am doing the same.  Lots of desiccant packs in my dry boxes and binocular cases.



#22 ihf

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 11:51 AM

That’s a pretty impressive hobby.  Is it not safe where you are?  smile.gif

Ah, it took me a while. In the western USA knives are considered tools, not weapons. I understand Japanese laws are very much different. No wonder as their knives - short or long - can kill with their beauty! Not just the more modern industry. There are many small traditional makers kept very much alive. But it is easy to deeply walk into stereotypes. It is just an interesting mix of history, art and technology.


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#23 Sketcher

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 03:18 PM

Appropriate care routines can vary tremendously depending on how many people handle the binoculars, how the binoculars are used, who's using them, where one uses the binoculars, one's environment (air pollution, pollen, dew, frost, hot and humid, cold and dry, etc.).  There's just a lot of variables that are going to vary for different people.  So all the care routines that one person does or does not do in the way of binocular care is highly unlikely to be necessary (or sufficient) for different people who's situations, etc. are different.

 

I have three pair of binoculars that I've owned for 20 to 40, years, depending on which pair we're talking about,. I would rate the current condition of all three (including their cases) as being excellent, "like new".

 

Alan (he know's who he is), and probably several others, will "cringe" at this; but I've never cleaned any of my binocular objectives.  Simply put, it's never been necessary.  And yes, they look just like they did when I first took them out of their cases, so it's not like I'm avoiding cleaning something that would benefit from a cleaning.  I clean the eye lenses on an "as needed" basis -- puffs from a bulb-blower followed by gentle wiping with pre-moistened lens-cleaning wipes.

 

Most of the time, after each use, I'll use a bulb-blower to give a few puffs of air on all exposed glass surfaces.  I've never had any pollen (stuck) on the objectives, never had any fingerprints on them, etc.  The objectives have never, since coming into my possession, been touched by anything except air and all the various particles of dust, etc. (that get blown off).

 

In my climate, with the way I use my binoculars, etc. I can (and do) avoid condensation (dew as well as frost) on all of my optical surfaces.  So I never have any of those nasty deposits that get left on an optic after moisture has evaporated -- a prime factor in  my ability to get away with never cleaning my objectives.  For others, this may not be possible or practical.  Yet, I still make good use of my binoculars.  My record cold night for an astronomical observation with my 20x80s was a minus 50 degree F. night -- yes, that's really, really, seriously cold!  I even made a sketch of the comet that I had gone out to observe on that night.

 

I always cap the optics and put the binoculars in their case(s) prior to coming inside.  If I have any doubt whatsoever concerning (unseen) moisture, once the cased binoculars have approached room temperature they're uncased (and uncapped) to allow for any trace amounts of moisture to evaporate.  After that, they're capped and returned to their cases where they stay until the next observing session.  If one were to add up the individual ages of each of my three binoculars, I could say that "my way" has worked flawlessly (for me) for somewhere in the neighborhood of 90 years.

 

I've never had any mold -- not anywhere on nor in my 40+ year old 20x80s, nor on (nor in) either of my other binoculars.   The three cases are each made of different materials.  For me and the way I do things, the case material has been irrelevant.  My binoculars (with lens caps on) stay in their cases when not being used -- without any problems.

 

I take a pair of binoculars outside only when I intend on using them.  They don't lie around outside while I'm looking through a telescope.  But like I said, not everyone will be able to, or want to, do things the same as I do nor will the same things work for everyone.  In the end, each person will have to find out what works with their ways, their climates,  etc.

 

One other factor that can be of some relevance is that I do all my observing from home -- no need for any traveling.  This gives me options that can be impractical or even non-existent for those who travel to their observing sites.  My binoculars don't spend any of their time bouncing around in a motorized vehicle.  I can bring my binoculars inside and outside repeatedly during the course of an observing session (as long as I keep "inside" dark -- which I can do).  If done in an intelligent manner, one can observe indefinitely without any dew or frosting concerns -- at least from my climate region.

 

Looking back at some of the other posts, I don't use desiccants.  I've never noticed any need for "cool down" time.  I've never used any sterilization procedures (I'm the only one who uses my binoculars).  I never use moisture-proof containers nor plastic bags (They don't just keep moisture out.  They'll also keep moisture in -- if any happens to make it in before sealing.)

 

My ways work for me.  Other ways might very well work out better for you!


Edited by Sketcher, 24 September 2021 - 03:31 PM.

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#24 MT4

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 06:54 PM

Appropriate care routines can vary tremendously depending on how many people handle the binoculars, how the binoculars are used, who's using them, where one uses the binoculars, one's environment (air pollution, pollen, dew, frost, hot and humid, cold and dry, etc.).  There's just a lot of variables that are going to vary for different people.  So all the care routines that one person does or does not do in the way of binocular care is highly unlikely to be necessary (or sufficient) for different people who's situations, etc. are different.

 

I have three pair of binoculars that I've owned for 20 to 40, years, depending on which pair we're talking about,. I would rate the current condition of all three (including their cases) as being excellent, "like new".

 

Alan (he know's who he is), and probably several others, will "cringe" at this; but I've never cleaned any of my binocular objectives.  Simply put, it's never been necessary.  And yes, they look just like they did when I first took them out of their cases, so it's not like I'm avoiding cleaning something that would benefit from a cleaning.  I clean the eye lenses on an "as needed" basis -- puffs from a bulb-blower followed by gentle wiping with pre-moistened lens-cleaning wipes.

 

Most of the time, after each use, I'll use a bulb-blower to give a few puffs of air on all exposed glass surfaces.  I've never had any pollen (stuck) on the objectives, never had any fingerprints on them, etc.  The objectives have never, since coming into my possession, been touched by anything except air and all the various particles of dust, etc. (that get blown off).

 

In my climate, with the way I use my binoculars, etc. I can (and do) avoid condensation (dew as well as frost) on all of my optical surfaces.  So I never have any of those nasty deposits that get left on an optic after moisture has evaporated -- a prime factor in  my ability to get away with never cleaning my objectives.  For others, this may not be possible or practical.  Yet, I still make good use of my binoculars.  My record cold night for an astronomical observation with my 20x80s was a minus 50 degree F. night -- yes, that's really, really, seriously cold!  I even made a sketch of the comet that I had gone out to observe on that night.

 

I always cap the optics and put the binoculars in their case(s) prior to coming inside.  If I have any doubt whatsoever concerning (unseen) moisture, once the cased binoculars have approached room temperature they're uncased (and uncapped) to allow for any trace amounts of moisture to evaporate.  After that, they're capped and returned to their cases where they stay until the next observing session.  If one were to add up the individual ages of each of my three binoculars, I could say that "my way" has worked flawlessly (for me) for somewhere in the neighborhood of 90 years.

 

I've never had any mold -- not anywhere on nor in my 40+ year old 20x80s, nor on (nor in) either of my other binoculars.   The three cases are each made of different materials.  For me and the way I do things, the case material has been irrelevant.  My binoculars (with lens caps on) stay in their cases when not being used -- without any problems.

 

I take a pair of binoculars outside only when I intend on using them.  They don't lie around outside while I'm looking through a telescope.  But like I said, not everyone will be able to, or want to, do things the same as I do nor will the same things work for everyone.  In the end, each person will have to find out what works with their ways, their climates,  etc.

 

One other factor that can be of some relevance is that I do all my observing from home -- no need for any traveling.  This gives me options that can be impractical or even non-existent for those who travel to their observing sites.  My binoculars don't spend any of their time bouncing around in a motorized vehicle.  I can bring my binoculars inside and outside repeatedly during the course of an observing session (as long as I keep "inside" dark -- which I can do).  If done in an intelligent manner, one can observe indefinitely without any dew or frosting concerns -- at least from my climate region.

 

Looking back at some of the other posts, I don't use desiccants.  I've never noticed any need for "cool down" time.  I've never used any sterilization procedures (I'm the only one who uses my binoculars).  I never use moisture-proof containers nor plastic bags (They don't just keep moisture out.  They'll also keep moisture in -- if any happens to make it in before sealing.)

 

My ways work for me.  Other ways might very well work out better for you!

 

Thank you very much for sharing your routine.

 

You're lucky to not have to deal with humidity, and hence have had no need for any desiccants or moisture-proof boxes.  In summer where I am, humidity is so high that the air feels sticky on your skin, and it's hot at the same time.   I can't afford to let my optics be exposed to such dangerously high (AccuWeather.com's term) levels of humidity.  As for the ziploc bags, I understand that the main point is to prevent condensation issues from sudden changes in temperature.


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#25 Spikey131

Spikey131

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 06:39 PM

One of the great things about the Fuji FMTR-SX binoculars is that they are virtually indestructible. It matters little how you care for them, they always perform. After a night of observing, I usually throw them in a vat of boiling acid before storing them in the sandbox ;-).
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