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choosing an astro camera for a Celestron 1400 edge hd

Astrophotography
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#1 stargazrfarmboy

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 05:02 PM

 I have a Celestron 1400 edge hd on a cgxl mount and I am looking for a good all around camera for that platform. I have been looking at ZWO cameras and would like to know your opinions on what would work best for both planetary and deep sky imaging. I would also like it to be able to be used as a guiding camera. I am looking at the ZWO ASI294MC Will this work on a long focal length system (f11) ?



#2 MikiSJ

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 05:12 PM

I currently use an ASI294MC-Pro with a Celestron OAG and ASI174MM-Mini on my C11EdgeHD/CGX combo. This is a very nice combo for what I want to do.

 

With the bigger image available to you with the C14, I would offer that you look at the newer ASI full-frame sensors.

 

Also, when I imaged with a CCD camera in aughts, I shot LRGB+Hα. If I had it to do over, I would get the ASI294MM-Pro and add a 1.25" filter wheel.

 

If you go with a full-frame camera, you will need 2" filters.

 

Good luck!



#3 idclimber

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 06:28 PM

I have been very happy with the ASI2600mm on my 12" SCT. I would suggest the OSC version if you don't want mono. It is a big step above either the 294 and not quite the jump to the 6200. The best would be the 6200 series but not all reducers can support that large of a sensor. My LF Starizona reducer can do this but is designed for the Edge.

 

f/11 is really not a good idea. Way to slow and you will well beyond oversampled. Get it down to f/7 with the reducer. Even then you will likely want to bin 2x2 as I am doing. 

 

Planetary is a completely different beast. I have used my guide camera (ASI174mm) but Jupiter was simply too low for my latitude to get good images last year. I may try again next season. 


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#4 WadeH237

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 06:32 PM

Hi stargazrfarmboy, and welcome to Cloudy Nights!

 

The C14 has a super long focal length.  It's just over 3900mm at the native F/11.  A good candidate camera would have really large pixels.  Even something like a 16803 sensor, with 9mm pixels, is going to give you an image scale of 0.47 arc seconds per pixel, which probably exceeds your seeing by a good margin.  If you want a CMOS camera, instead of CCD, then something with an IMX455 sensor would be good.  You would want a mono version with 50mm square filters, and you would bin it 2x2.

 

I hate to open this can of worms, but I should ask how much experience you have with deep sky imaging.  The reason that I ask is that the C14 is a wicked unforgiving telescope for deep sky work, and has kicked the butt of many imagers, even experienced ones.  Also, you are significantly under mounted with a CGX-L (at least for deep sky imaging).  I, personally, would want a much better mount for that scope.

 

Finally, I would add that I actually have a C14, and I have a very good mount that can carry it (it has a 220 lb capacity).  Even with all that in my favor, I really never use the C14 for imaging.  It's a whole lot of work, and I can get 90% of the result with a C8 and a bit longer exposure times.

 

If you are new to deep sky imaging, then even that C8 should be considered an advanced scope, and not really a good scope for learning how to do deep sky work.

 

I don't say any of this to discourage you.  On the contrary, I love to help people to be successful with this hobby.  I am saying it because I would hate to see you spend $10K to $15K on a well matched camera with filters, and then find out that your results are poor.

 

If you already have the scope and the mount, I would encourage you to try it with a DSLR before spending a bunch more money.  DSLR's are very capable cameras, and they will give you some idea of the challenges that you'll face with the C14, without the expense.

 

Also, as Dave mentioned above, my response all assumes deep sky imaging (ie. nebulae, galaxies, etc.)  If you want to image the planets and moon, then that's a whole different thing, and your scope and mount will work fine.  In that case, you would want a one shot color camera that supports high speed video.  Most of the modern CMOS cameras would be reasonable candidates.  You would probably want one with at least a 4/3 size sensor.



#5 DuncanM

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 06:52 PM

I have been very happy with the ASI2600mm on my 12" SCT. I would suggest the OSC version if you don't want mono. It is a big step above either the 294 and not quite the jump to the 6200. The best would be the 6200 series but not all reducers can support that large of a sensor. My LF Starizona reducer can do this but is designed for the Edge.

 

f/11 is really not a good idea. Way to slow and you will well beyond oversampled. Get it down to f/7 with the reducer. Even then you will likely want to bin 2x2 as I am doing. 

 

Planetary is a completely different beast. I have used my guide camera (ASI174mm) but Jupiter was simply too low for my latitude to get good images last year. I may try again next season. 

I'm guessing you meant to state that the Starizona LF '...is not designed for the Edge.'

 

Celestron makes a large format camera capable, .7x reducer for the Edge 14, and Optec makes one for smaller cameras.

 

Starizona has come out with the Hyperstar 4 to convert the Edge 14 into an F2 astrograph, capable of providing corrected images over a 43mm diagonal:

https://starizona.co...=37405606150306


Edited by DuncanM, 24 September 2021 - 06:54 PM.

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#6 idclimber

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Posted 24 September 2021 - 07:03 PM

Wade makes an excellent point. I would not have been successful without first learning on my 4" refractor. And like him I have a high end mount. It is also seriously expensive considering the reducer, external focuser and motor, OAG that needed to be added to image well. 




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