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Doubles of the Arrow's Shaft

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#1 VanJan

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 12:17 AM

I generated the following list of doubles from 19h 44.0m to 19h 56.0m in Sagitta, suitable for my 20cm reflector. By scrolling through the WDS, I believe the list is comprehensive for the shaft of the arrow for my aperture.

 

STF 2569 - 19h 44.8m +16° 49'     8.44, 9.07   2.2"   357°   (2020)   A0     Reddish, slate. 200X

 

J 1185 - 19h 45.0m +19° 02'     9.79, 11.20   5.2"   100°   (2015)   A2     Reddish, violet. NE star of a small group. 200X

 

OL 72 - 19h 46.8m +18° 39'     10.5, 10.6   7.1"   9°   (2016)     This double np Delta SGE. Both reddish. Bluish 10thmv companion p. 200X

 

HU 345 - 19h 46.8m +17° 33'     8.98, 9.98   3.8"   104°   (2018)   K     Orange, blue. Lovely colors. 200X

 

HU 347 - 19h 47.6m +19° 17'     8.32, 11.3   1.5"   324°   (2015)   F5     Pale orange, lilac. 250X

 

J 3011 - 19h 48.6m +18° 44'     9.4, 11.3   10.0"   305°   (2015)   B8     Reddish-white, purple. 200X

 

GWP 2896 - 19h 48.7m +17° 35'     10.5, 10.7   290.6"   223°   (2015)     This listing seemed odd to me as soon as I came across it. Why would the WDS include a pair of relatively faint stars almost 300" apart? The primary is plotted in my Millennium Star Atlas, so I had no trouble locating it. But at 143X, there is no 10th magnitude secondary star at the position indicated. However, there is a 10th magnitude star at approximately the P.A. listing if you lop off the "2" of the 290.6" and make it 90.6". Even so, the position of this putative secondary star did not seem exactly right to me. I'll leave it up to the data mining experts to solve this mystery, if they are so inclined to do so. The stars I saw were hint of red, hint of blue, with a 12thmv companion sf making a triangle with the double.

 

GRV 281 - 19h 48.7m +16° 34'     8.78, 9.03   35.5"   222°   (2015)   F2     Yellow, orange. Violet 11.5 magnitude companion sf makes triangle with double. 143X

 

Zeta SGE - 19h 49.0m +19° 09'     AB-C = 5.04, 9.01   8.3"   311°   (2016)   A1V     AB-D = 5.04, 11.0   76.0"   246°   (2005)     This is the showpiece of the list. Yellow, ochre, lavender. 200X

 

BRT 1328 - 19h 49.0m +17° 11'     10.2, 10.6   4.6"   130°   (2016)     Both white. 200X

 

HU 346 - 19h 49.6m +17° 07'     9.28, 9.98   0.7"   190°   (2016)   A     Not resolved at powers up to 313X. Primary is hint of red.

 

J 3014 - 19h 49.8m +18° 44'     10.43, 10.86   6.4"   347°   (2016)   B8     Reddish, bluish. Violet 11.5 magnitude companion sp. 200X

 

H 4 99 - 19h 50.0m +17° 57'     7.99, 11.07   25.6"   83°   (2018)   B7Vp, B9V   C = 9.10, 68.8", 256°   D = 13.23, 44.1", 340°   E = 13.42, 71.0", 143°     White, bluish, reddish, no color, no color. 200X

 

J 141 - 19h 50.5m +17° 26'     10.91, 11.18   4.4"   45°   (2015)   A3     Both white. 200X

 

BAZ 12 - 19h 50.8m +19° 17'     10.2, 10.8   2.5"   288°   (2015)     Both white. 313X

 

HEI 9013 - 19h 52.3m +17° 37'     10.9, 11.1   4.2"   330°   (2015)     Both white. 10thmv companion sf. 200X

 

J 151 - 19h 52.7m +18° 48'     9.5, 11.0   4.2"   196°   (2018)     White, no color. 200X

 

J 830 - 19h 54.2m +17° 44'     10.1, 10.5   3.5"   194°   (2018)   F8     Both white. 13thmv companion np. 250X

 

J 1145 - 19h 54.9m +19° 09'     10.32, 12.02   1.6"   313°   (2002)   A2     Very difficult. Reddish-white, no color. 13thmv companion nf. 313X

 

HO 116 - 19h 56.0m +17° 53'     8.33, 11.71   3.9"   20°   (2000)   B9   C = 13.3, 18.0", 12°     White, no color, no color. Coarse triple of two 12th and one 13th magnitude star sf. 313X

 

Whew! gottahurt.gif I think the next project I set for myself is going to be easier in compilation and more leisurely in observing. After all, sometimes aiming high with an arrow will have it coming straight back down. scared.gif

 

 


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#2 flt158

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 06:02 AM

Sublime report, Van Jan!

Can you give us a rough estimate how long it took to observe all these systems?

Could it have over the course of 2 or 3 nights?

 

I sometimes get bogged down with huge lists on Stelle Doppie. 

 

Great marathon!

 

Aubrey. 


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#3 VanJan

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 06:41 AM

Sublime report, Van Jan!

Can you give us a rough estimate how long it took to observe all these systems?

Could it have over the course of 2 or 3 nights?

 

I sometimes get bogged down with huge lists on Stelle Doppie. 

 

Great marathon!

 

Aubrey. 

 

Since I knew it was going to be clear last night, I spent a couple of hours yesterday afternoon compiling and checking the list. Then about two and a half hours observing them yesterday evening. (Instant gratification snoopy2.gif) The observing time was cut down by the targets being relatively near one another - so less effort star-hopping, more effort eye-straining because most of the doubles were dim and close.

 

I know what you mean by getting bogged down by target availability. Sometimes judgement filters are more valuable than eyepiece filters. lol.gif  


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