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Celestron 8" Evolution- Eyepieces

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#1 Etudes

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 02:51 PM

As I mentioned we're just getting started with the new 8" Evolution. I'd appreciate any suggestions for broadening our eyepiece collection beyond what came with it. 


Edited by Etudes, 25 September 2021 - 03:19 PM.


#2 photomagica

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 03:08 PM

I have an Evolution C8 and have spent many, many fascinating hours with it. Good quality, modern design, wide field eyepieces truly transform the experience with the telescope and make it much more enjoyable to use. The Nagler T4 12 mm pretty much lives on the telescope.  Any of the 11 to 13mm Nagler eyepieces will be great on the C8. I like a Nagler 7mm for higher powers and you will want something quite wide as well. I'd suggest an 82 degree eyepiece in the 20 to 30mm range. The Explore scientific 82 deg. 24mm is excellent. I find with the wider field 82 degree eyepieces, I need fewer eyepieces to do the job. I also have a Baader 8-24mm Zoom. It is very good, but I tend to use it only in indifferent to poor seeing where I need to tune the power to the conditions. Otherwise I far prefer the wider field of the Naglers.

For 2" eyepieces you will want a good 2" diagonal. I bought the Celestron one and like it. 

Enjoy your Evo 8!

Bill

 

PS. I buy most of my eyepieces used on CN.


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#3 whizbang

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 04:03 PM

Another vote for Naglers or ES 82 degree eyepieces.

 

Your EVO 8 is a hi mag, lo FOV instrument.  What you need is large field two inch eyepieces.  For my EVO 8, I use:

 

Explore Scientific 40mm 68 deg and a Explore Scientific 24mm 82 deg, and 82 degree, TV Naglers in 17mm, 13mm, 9mm and 7mm.

 

Seeing has to be very good and the scope needs to be cooled before the 7 and 9 come out and play.  I experimented for almost two years with lower end, "affordable" eyepieces.  I found the views unsatisfactory.  Don't be like me and waste a year and a half of your life goofing off with cheap eyepieces.  Just start saving now so you can buy good glass.


Edited by whizbang, 25 September 2021 - 04:05 PM.

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#4 GazingOli

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 04:34 PM

I never had the chance to try Naglers but I own a CPC 800 and I am very happy with various Erfle-design eyepieces around 70 degree and also with Skywatcher Nirvana with 82 degree. The the best bet on galaxies is a 2" / 25 mm Erfle from Explore Scientific for me. For more power I am using a 15 mm noname Erfle with surprinsingly good quality. For The Moon and the planets I am using a 7 mm SW Nirvana or a 10 mm Baader Classic Ortho, if the seeing is not so well.

 

The choice of eye pieces is a question of personal taste and also of the size of your wallet. But especially with a C8 you can use simple Erfle or Ortho design eyepieces.

 

CS.Oli


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#5 rboe

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 05:12 PM

F/10 SCT are very eye piece agnostic. All but the most crappy will serve you well. So all these newer fancy (and very pricey) wide apparent field of view eye pieces - I'm not that big of a fan. If something does fit in the field of view that I'm keen on I switch to a fast refractor (which does NOT like cheap eye pieces so I throw my Pentax XL's at it).

 

That said, I was rather fond of the 19mm Panoptic. Never have warmed up to Naglers but they do have a strong fan base.

 

So I'll advise you to get to some star parties and test drive some to see what floats your boat. In the mean time, I have a full set of the Paradigms and Titans (mainly used in public settings, but I'm not adverse to using them in the backyard); for the money you'll be very hard pressed to find something better. For slow scopes.

 

I did buy a 10mm ortho for collimation purposes, otherwise, not a real big fan or ortho's because of the very short eye relief.

 

TeleVue Plossl's made TeleVue what they are today - very well made eye pieces and excellent performers. I have developed a tasted for the older Celestron orange label Utima's and have a few of those.

 

Unless you get sucked into the really wide field view eye pieces (and that sucking noise will be $$ leaving your wallet) you can pick up a decent set of good eye pieces; new or used, that will last you a long time. Or at least until you get a fast refractor - then some premium glass will be called for. Since good refractors typically bring a premium price the shock value should be over by then. :D


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#6 Etudes

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 08:59 PM

Hi Bill,

 

Sounds intriguing!  Really appreciate your thoughts on what to try and why.  I'll keep you posted. 

 

Tim  

I have an Evolution C8 and have spent many, many fascinating hours with it. Good quality, modern design, wide field eyepieces truly transform the experience with the telescope and make it much more enjoyable to use. The Nagler T4 12 mm pretty much lives on the telescope.  Any of the 11 to 13mm Nagler eyepieces will be great on the C8. I like a Nagler 7mm for higher powers and you will want something quite wide as well. I'd suggest an 82 degree eyepiece in the 20 to 30mm range. The Explore scientific 82 deg. 24mm is excellent. I find with the wider field 82 degree eyepieces, I need fewer eyepieces to do the job. I also have a Baader 8-24mm Zoom. It is very good, but I tend to use it only in indifferent to poor seeing where I need to tune the power to the conditions. Otherwise I far prefer the wider field of the Naglers.

For 2" eyepieces you will want a good 2" diagonal. I bought the Celestron one and like it. 

Enjoy your Evo 8!

Bill

 

PS. I buy most of my eyepieces used on CN.



#7 rboe

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Posted 25 September 2021 - 09:14 PM

If you add your general location to bio; someone may be near enough to offer a test drive on some eye pieces or recommend a local club or star party that help you decide.

 

And Welcome to Cloudy Nights!



#8 Etudes

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Posted 26 September 2021 - 01:01 AM

If you add your general location to bio; someone may be near enough to offer a test drive on some eye pieces or recommend a local club or star party that help you decide.

 

And Welcome to Cloudy Nights!

Will do- great idea ! 

 

Tim 



#9 Etudes

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Posted 26 September 2021 - 01:16 AM

Thank you all for the input and sharing your experience!  I will be no doubt be referring back to your posts as we move forward.  

 

Tim


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#10 12Bass

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Posted 26 September 2021 - 03:55 AM

With my NexStar GPS 8 (same basic SCT optical design), my most used eyepiece is an Explore Scientific 68° 24mm, which gives the widest possible true field of view (TFOV is roughly 0.7°) with the stock 1.25" diagonal*; the full Moon fits quite comfortably within this field.  I also have an ES11mm 82° which is used for higher magnification, including star clusters, the Moon, and planets.  In addition to that is a Celestron lens and filter kit with a variety of roughly 50° apparent field of view (AFOV) eyepieces. 

 

Generally, I use the ES24mm and 11mm, sometimes switching to a Celestron 6mm or 9mm for higher magnification if seeing is good.  The Celestron 32mm eyepiece has roughly the same TFOV as the ES24mm 68° at a lower magnification; I have yet to find an application when I have found it better than the ES24mm, though perhaps it might gather a little more light when looking at nebulae (the Orion Nebula looks pretty similar in both, just smaller and farther away in the 32mm).  The included Celestron 40mm also offers about the same TFOV as the ES24mm, but at an even lower magnification, and it feels like looking through a tunnel.  The ES24mm 68° just provides a much more luxurious experience than the Celestron 32mm and 40mm, IMO.  The 4mm eyepiece included in the kit is useful for fine collimation adjustment and maybe for looking at the Moon, but not much else.  So, overall, I would suggest passing on the Celestron eyepiece kit and just buy a few specific higher quality eyepieces of your preference.

 

While some really like having an extremely wide AFOV, I've found that a 68° field is more than enough for me.  With the 11mm 82°, I find my eye has to really search around the field for objects of interest, as it isn't possible to take everything at once (e.g. if you're looking at a star cluster, not a planet or double star); Nagler calls this "spacewalking" from what I gather, and it is an interesting experience, but not a huge advantage over 68° for my taste, so personally, I'd spare the extra expense of 82° eyepieces, while 68° gives a worthwhile advantage over regular 50° eyepieces, though subjective preference obviously comes into play here.

 

*It is possible to get an even wider, roughly 1.2°, TFOV by adding a 0.63x reducer/corrector to the 1.25" diagonal, or you can add a 2" diagonal along with wider and more expensive 2" eyepieces, though there isn't much more TFOV to be had with an 8" SCT.



#11 Etudes

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Posted 26 September 2021 - 10:59 PM

F/10 SCT are very eye piece agnostic. All but the most crappy will serve you well. So all these newer fancy (and very pricey) wide apparent field of view eye pieces - I'm not that big of a fan. If something does fit in the field of view that I'm keen on I switch to a fast refractor (which does NOT like cheap eye pieces so I throw my Pentax XL's at it).

 

That said, I was rather fond of the 19mm Panoptic. Never have warmed up to Naglers but they do have a strong fan base.

 

So I'll advise you to get to some star parties and test drive some to see what floats your boat. In the mean time, I have a full set of the Paradigms and Titans (mainly used in public settings, but I'm not adverse to using them in the backyard); for the money you'll be very hard pressed to find something better. For slow scopes.

 

I did buy a 10mm ortho for collimation purposes, otherwise, not a real big fan or ortho's because of the very short eye relief.

 

TeleVue Plossl's made TeleVue what they are today - very well made eye pieces and excellent performers. I have developed a tasted for the older Celestron orange label Utima's and have a few of those.

 

Unless you get sucked into the really wide field view eye pieces (and that sucking noise will be $$ leaving your wallet) you can pick up a decent set of good eye pieces; new or used, that will last you a long time. Or at least until you get a fast refractor - then some premium glass will be called for. Since good refractors typically bring a premium price the shock value should be over by then. laugh.gif

Thanks Ron. Great to hear another perspective of options for my scope. You guys are all helping me flatten the learning curve a little bit :) 



#12 Noah4x4

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 12:19 AM

Happy Valley Oregon sounds like the sort of location where access to dark sky sites is realistic. If so, the advice in this thread is excellent. However, I have a caution for those in (say) the light polluted South East of the UK or similarly blighted areas elsewhere.

To get the best from visual astronomy you need dark skies. I invested £2,000 in superior eyepieces, improved diagonal etc and still only saw faint fuzzies. I then invested another £2,000 on travel and accommodation before discovering that even if you find dark skies, they are often cloudy. My point is don't become obsessed with buying a complete set of Televue, Nagler or other expensive quality eyepieces. If you have a 12mm Plossl you probably won't benefit from an 8mm as under poor skies extra magnification can make mushy views of planets even worse. If skies are not great, I would suggest buy merely a Televue 12mm Delos and something like a 38mm Televue Plossl is all you might need. If they don't float your boat, you then might need to pursue Electronically Assisted Astronomy/Observing (EAA) usung a camera to boost your views. I now have a large collection of redundant eyepieces having fallen into the EAA rabbit hole, but that is another expensive story. Best advice, take your time when purchasing any accessories. You probably need far less than you perceive. Take your time until you find your best destiny, be that visual, EAA or even both.

Edited by Noah4x4, 27 September 2021 - 12:22 AM.

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#13 rboe

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 08:28 PM

My first scope was a TeleVue Pronto (70mm), then got a NexStar11GPS. From my backyard the 11" did NOT give me much more that what the Pronto gave me. Then I got to a dark sky and it was like I got a new scope.

 

In an attempt to eek out the most of that little Pronto I got some 2X and 5X barlows and some higher power eye pieces. An expensive lesson that mimics Noah's post above - seeing often trumped any money I tried to through at it. So then I tried bigger aparture and met some success but found that dark skies AND excellent seeing can't be beat. This summer, from the back yard, seeing has been pretty good - but I also keep the magnification down and didn't use anything larger than 8". Typically just 100mm.

 

Come winter, I use the Trap in Orion to judge seeing. With good seeing I can see 6 stars. As it degrades it will go down to 3ish. On really bad days it's mush. I use Jupiter in the summer months (well, this year anyway). Too often in the past I could make out two dark bands and that was it. This year hints of detail. One night I was catching the shadow of a transit then got to see the small bump of the moon as it came out of the planet. Pretty cool!

 

So this is why I really push star parties and testing things out there - before buying. Because the temptation to add to your kit is great (no judgement if you do because as you  read these posts it's a common thread among all of us! lol.gif ). But hope springs eternal so we try to steer you away from that pitfall so you can discover new ones on your own. Like EAA -wait, that was already covered. :wron:

 

Enjoy!


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#14 mlord

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 09:06 PM

The problem with star parties has been.. the last year and a half really.

Better times ahead though!


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#15 rboe

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 10:14 PM

Yes. frown.gif And eyes can make very good access points for infections. Caution is encouraged.

 

Sometimes, you can have a party of two......


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