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My first binoculars

Binoculars
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#1 antoniodimaio

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 03:02 PM

Hi wanted to buy a telescope to start it astronomy along with some nice books but I found out out that the best way to start
is to buy couple of binoculars to learn the sky. I don't want to buy an expensive one but at the same time I would like t
be able to "see" at least moon surface and main planets , not only stars. I selected those option which are 10x50 above after reading several blogs.

Which one you recommend :

 

- Orion UltraView 10x50
- Olympus 10x50
- Nikon 7245 Action 10x50
- Celetron SkyMaster 10x60
- Nikon 10x50 Aculon a2111
- Celetron 9x63 DX SkyMaster
- Celestron 71009 SkyMaster 15 x 70
- SkyGenius 10x50
- Opticon Oregon NA 10x50

 

 

Thank you so much. ;)

 


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#2 spaceoddity

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 03:14 PM

Oberwerk 11X70 and a monopod.



#3 hallelujah

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 03:27 PM

Nikon makes very good 10x50 binoculars plus they have an excellent warranty.

 

https://imaging.niko..._a211/index.htm

 

Do you wear eyeglasses?

 

Hand held binoculars of 10x aren't that exciting for planets.

 

Stan


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#4 ECP M42

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 04:03 PM

If you reside in Italy or nearby, you may want to try these brand new IBIS binoculars. They highly recommended them to me 

 

https://www.teleskop...0-tecnosky.html

 

Same invoices as the Nikon AE but half the price. It doesn't get any better at that price. 

 

Henry 



#5 sevenofnine

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Posted 27 September 2021 - 09:41 PM

If you really want to see lunar and planetary detail, you need a telescope. The binoculars that you are considering are more for locating objects in the night sky. Think barely visible but that's where you point the scope. If your budget is limited, I suggest you look at a 6" manual Dobsonian reflector. The Sky-Watcher Classic 150P is an example. This is a proper telescope that you will enjoy for many years. Best of luck to you! waytogo.gif


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#6 peta62

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 10:30 AM

It is a wise decision in my opinion, I have seen even the most experienced observers to take binos and enjoy the wide field in the sky, especially through the Milky Way, but not only. The binos accompany you even later, when you have great scope.

In order to make it easy on you, I would not go much over 10x50. First it because the higher the magnification, the narrower field and so it is more difficult to find the object you are looking at in the binos. Second it becomes heavier, so while holding it up your hands start to get tired, start to shake, scope magnifies the shakes as anything else and it becomes inconvenient.



#7 Binojunky

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 11:22 AM

Bushnell Legacy 10x50, ( not on the list I know) often on sale or with a mail in rebate, of the OP,s list several of those have been defective when they arrived at my door, just make sure that the retailer has a good return policy, Dave


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#8 antoniodimaio

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 05:09 PM

thanks so much guys i will go for 10x50 then a telescope maybe later on. yep i red good review of Nikon i will also give

a look at Bushnell and oberwerk 10x50? 



#9 antoniodimaio

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 01:48 PM

hi all. Yesterday i took a photo of the moon with my gf mobile which can zoom x30. i was able to get to see the surface and distingush the darker and brighter area . Now I am thinking about the binocular zoom which in my case will be X10.

Is the mobile better than the a couple of 10x50 binoculars? i am confused...

thanks a lot



#10 peta62

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 02:06 PM

No it is not. A/ You will see surfaces on the Moon with binoculars too. B/ Your eyes cannot zoom. You can try to take picture of anything with your phone, extremely zoom it and compare with what you see with naked eye. The ratio will be the same.



#11 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 02:28 PM

I also recommend a 10x50 binocular.

There's a section on binocular astronomy towards the bottom of my Cloudy Nights post at https://www.cloudyni...mers/?p=5184287 that you may find useful, antoniodimaio.



#12 Neoma

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 03:48 PM

hi all. Yesterday i took a photo of the moon with my gf mobile which can zoom x30. i was able to get to see the surface and distingush the darker and brighter area . Now I am thinking about the binocular zoom which in my case will be X10.

Is the mobile better than the a couple of 10x50 binoculars? i am confused...

thanks a lot

https://imgur.com/a/nGcs9EW this is pretty much how you would see the Moon with 10x50.

 

And I recommend 10x50 binoculars for Astronomy purposes, too. Maybe even 12x50. Not more unless you want to use a tripod which imho is not as enjoyable. In that case I would go for a telescope.


Edited by Neoma, 29 September 2021 - 03:50 PM.


#13 antoniodimaio

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 04:28 PM

thank you when i open the link i got image not found

#14 ECP M42

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 08:45 AM

hi all. Yesterday i took a photo of the moon with my gf mobile which can zoom x30. i was able to get to see the surface and distingush the darker and brighter area . Now I am thinking about the binocular zoom which in my case will be X10.

Is the mobile better than the a couple of 10x50 binoculars? i am confused...

thanks a lot

In theory, if you photograph the Moon by placing the 10x binoculars on the tripod and the telephone on the eyepiece, the two magnifications multiply up to 300x (10x * 30x).
But it all depends on what optical magnification the 30x zoom starts at and how much of that 30x is an optical magnification or just a digital magnification.
If your phone basically uses a pushed wide-angle fixed lens (no optical zoom), such as a 21mm equivalent (on 24x36 format), the 30x zoom will be fully digital and the base magnification is 0.5x.
The naked eye has a magnification of 1x.



#15 KennyJ

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 03:43 PM

I remember posting many years ago to either this or the Cloudy Days forum with a query surrounding my estimation from personal observations that even the optical zoom on my Panosonic camera needing to set to between 3x and 4x or thereabouts to present images equivalent to (1x) naked eye, and even higher "nominal enlargements" for the digital zooms.

 

I also remember other members following up my post informing me about the matter being "more complex than that", but if I understood at the time what the reasons given were, I've forgotten now.

 

I have a vague recollection of no - one else seeming to agree with me, but only a few weeks ago I arrived at the same conclusion when viewing and photographing the moon.

 

Through the camera's view finder, and looking at a photo taken without any zoom application at all, a full moon appears as a tiny sphere, around three or four times smaller than it does through my naked eyes.

 

Maybe it's just my eyes?!! -- smile.gif

 

Kenny



#16 normjackson

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 05:33 PM

Just as with different computer monitor sizes, the EVF in a digital camera can effectively present a larger or smaller "screen". Hence even at the same "400mm equivalent" setting a more modern bridge camera might show a "bigger picture" in the viewfinder than an earlier one and still be apparently sharp thanks to the extra pixels in that more modern larger display.

 

Over on Birdforum there are threads of folks discussing using their bridge cameras with image stabilisation to acquire images they can review and zoom in on on the camera display (or later on a full size monitor) to aid in identification. I don't get the impression that these cameras are considered as superior to either binoculars or scopes for real time viewing yet. I guess the list price and reception of the Sony digital binoculars suggests there's still a bit more work to do?



#17 MT4

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 07:42 PM

thank you when i open the link i got image not found

 

Maybe that's what the moon looks like at 10x smile.gif smile.gif

 

All kidding aside, the moon does look very nice in a quality 10x.  (I should know because I have 5 pairs of high-quality 10x binos.   Just don't ask me why I need 5 pairs smile.gif)

 

That being said, since you seem to want to see surface details of the moon and enjoy looking at the planets too, aside from the stars, 10x is too low a power for that.   Sure you can easily see the dark shadows on the moon but to be able to really recognize them for what they are, I am afraid you'll need much higher mags than 10x.  Even my Fujinon FMT-SX 10x50, one of the most if not the 2nd most highly-acclaimed 10x50 aside from the astronomically-priced Nikon WX 10x50, doesn't give me satisfying details on the moon or Jupiter or Saturn.  These heavenly objects look far better starting 15x/18x and up, and they deserve the higher mags.

 

That's one reason why I have multiple binos at different mag levels.   The different mags give you different views of the same object, with lower mags giving more context and higher mags giving bigger image scales and better resolution.



#18 ECP M42

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 10:40 PM

Maybe it's just my eyes?!! -- smile.gif

No Kenny, it's not your eyes! smirk.gif  

 

The main causes are the lens, most likely a wide-angle that zooming out instead of zooming in, and the camera viewfinder that generally has a magnification less than 1x, between 0.50x and 0.72x (with another "shrink" factor). 

 

Henry



#19 ECP M42

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 10:58 PM

Just as with different computer monitor sizes, the EVF in a digital camera can effectively present a larger or smaller "screen". Hence even at the same "400mm equivalent" setting a more modern bridge camera might show a "bigger picture" in the viewfinder than an earlier one and still be apparently sharp thanks to the extra pixels in that more modern larger display.

In reality, a more modern EVF with more image points (or pixels), would present the same smaller photo (when viewed at 100%).

What you have noticed is caused by the increase of the pixels of the sensor, of the more modern bridge. And in that case the 100% zoomed image shows more detail and therefore appears larger.
Imagine the increase of pixels in the sensor (with the same size), as the decrease of the focal length of the eyepiece on the same telescope.



#20 normjackson

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 03:48 AM

What you have noticed is caused by the increase of the pixels of the sensor, of the more modern bridge. And in that case the 100% zoomed image shows more detail and therefore appears larger.

The pixel size and count on the EVF is totally independent of the camera sensor (except that the pixel count in the EVF is  invariably less).  Then there is an optical system in place to view the mini monitor which will influence how "big" the view is. There is no 100%. Yet more BS playing with numbers. Time to utilise the forum "ignore" facility methinks...



#21 spaceoddity

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 05:33 PM

There's a thread on this forum about the svbony ED binoculars. They now have a 10X50 model and the initial review is extremely positive, great deal at around $170. Just thought I'd throw that into the mix. I might order a pair myself. I will say that I have the oberwerk 11X70's and they rock, sharp optics! However they are a little hard to hold steady by hand even though they are very light for the aperture. It's possible if you have something to rest your elbows on. Oberwerk also sells a very nice monopod for binoculars, holds them steady with less hassle than a tripod. 



#22 colt45sa

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 07:21 PM

I started at the ripe old age of 16.  I'd saved my money from cutting lawns and bought a new pair of 7x50 IF binoculars by Yoshida.  I was happy with them for years. 



#23 antoniodimaio

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 05:50 AM

I got an Nikon Aculon A211 12x50, nice moon watching but when I pointed to jupiter (I had the feeling I could see the moons) I could not take the binoculars stable enough and the spot was actualy going around :((. 

How I can take a photo of the moon using the binoculars ? I have a nice Nikon camera...

Thanks.



#24 MartinPond

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 09:43 AM

I got an Nikon Aculon A211 12x50, nice moon watching but when I pointed to jupiter (I had the feeling I could see the moons) I could not take the binoculars stable enough and the spot was actualy going around frown.gif(. 

How I can take a photo of the moon using the binoculars ? I have a nice Nikon camera...

Thanks.

At 12x50, you would definitely see an improvement 

     with a monopod or a tripod.  For photos...a tripod is best.

 

Without a fancier setup, an adaptor for the camera in your phone would

    be easier to use.   The entrance pupil of a smartphone camera

    is easier to feed.


Edited by MartinPond, 14 October 2021 - 09:44 AM.



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