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Constellation of the month- Aquarius

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#1 brida1709a

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Posted 04 October 2021 - 08:22 PM

What interesting stars and DSOs can anyone talk about that they find interesting?



#2 brida1709a

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Posted 05 October 2021 - 10:57 AM

M 73 is a 4-star asterism mislabeled as an open cluster. The stars are not physically related, and is one of several catalog anomalies that exist within the Messier Objects.

#3 Gridley

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Posted 05 October 2021 - 01:05 PM

I awaiting delivery of a 10" dob and just getting back into the hobby.  I just added M2 to my first observe list.  Looking it up in my old copy of Burnham's, it describes it as "partially resolvable" in 8-10" scopes.  I'd be interested to hear some experiences with M2.



#4 Ihtegla Sar

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Posted 05 October 2021 - 03:00 PM

I enjoy both the Saturn Nebula (NGC 7009) and the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293).  The first time I went looking for them I found the Saturn nebula first. It is fairly small (41″ × 35″) and very beautiful blue, but since its so small and seeing is usually not great at my dark site, I rarely can use enough magnification to see the "rings." 

 

So, after looking at the Saturn Nebula for the first time, I went searching for the Helix, which in my notes I had written down it was mag 7.4 and 25" in size, so I was looking for something slightly smaller than the Saturn nebula and just a little brighter.  Well, I was surprised to find something large and relatively dim in the same general area, but I was undeterred and passed it over while scanning around for the Helix.  

 

It took me several minutes to realize my mistake.  Not 25".  The Helix is 25', or almost the size of the full moon.  Once I realized my mistake, I went back to the large dim object I had seen earlier and enjoyed looking at the Helix for a good long while.



#5 Redbetter

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Posted 06 October 2021 - 05:25 AM

There are a lot of objects in Aquarius worth taking a look at, depending on what aperture you have and how dark your skies are.  The Helix and Saturn planetary nebulae have already been mentioned.  There are three globular clusters, including M2 which is visible naked eye in dark sky.  The other globulars are M72 and NGC 7492.  There are several Herschel 400 galaxies and many NGC and IC galaxies.  And then there is the Aquarius dwarf, a dim, but moderate sized, low surface brightness member of the Local Group of galaxies.



#6 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 06 October 2021 - 12:40 PM

Some of the DSOs in Aquarius worthy of observation are discussed in the article at https://www.astronom...ts-in-aquarius/

Here are the DSOs in Aquarius from my October Celestial Calendar: NGC 7180, NGC 7183, NGC 7184, NGC 7293, NGC 7392, NGC 7585, NGC 7606, NGC 7721, NGC 7723, NGC 7727 (Aquarius)

https://www.cloudyni.../#entry11399432



#7 brida1709a

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Posted 06 October 2021 - 07:53 PM

The variable star R Aqr has a nebula (Ced 211) surrounding it. Located near the stars Omega1, 2 Aqr.

#8 j.gardavsky

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 12:24 PM

As you like the oddities of the observable universal continuity,

 

the constellation of Aquarius is a home of some molecular clouds and HII clouds, visible through the binoculars:

- The Lama Head Nebula LBN 117 between Nu and Beta Aquarii, total extent 360'x120',

(the angled lama head SW off Beta Aquarii is well recognizable)

- The molecular clouds brightening MBM 46, 47, 48 around 21h10m -10°00'

- The stream 12 Aquarii - Theta Aquilae - 41 Aquilae with the Lynds' LBN condensations

 

Clear dark skies are the prerequisite,

JG


Edited by j.gardavsky, 13 October 2021 - 12:25 PM.


#9 brida1709a

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 12:54 AM

As you like the oddities of the observable universal continuity,

 

the constellation of Aquarius is a home of some molecular clouds and HII clouds, visible through the binoculars:

- The Lama Head Nebula LBN 117 between Nu and Beta Aquarii, total extent 360'x120',

(the angled lama head SW off Beta Aquarii is well recognizable)

- The molecular clouds brightening MBM 46, 47, 48 around 21h10m -10°00'

- The stream 12 Aquarii - Theta Aquilae - 41 Aquilae with the Lynds' LBN condensations

 

Clear dark skies are the prerequisite,

JG

Thank you so much for this! This surely helps me discover newer objects I have never seen before. Who knew their would "Llamas" within the boundaries of Water Carrier :)


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#10 brida1709a

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 12:57 AM

"The stars that form the Water Jar are not physically related to each other, but merely appear in the same line of sight when seen from Earth. Zeta Aquarii, the oldest, brightest, and nearest of the four at 92 light years, lies at the center of the asterism. Pi Aquarii, the faintest and most distant, lies 780 light years away and is by far the most luminous of the four, as well as the only supernova candidate in the group. All four stars are younger than the Sun, but since they are also more massive, they will not live as long as our star."- Water Jar (Constellation Guide)- https://www.constellation-guide.com/



#11 brida1709a

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 12:59 AM

The Aquarius Dwarf is an irregular dwarf galaxy and a member of the Local Group of galaxies. It is approximately 3.1 million light years distant and has an apparent magnitude of 14.0.

 

The Aquarius Dwarf is one of the rare galaxies that display a blueshift; it is moving toward the Milky Way Galaxy at 137 km/s.



#12 brida1709a

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 01:04 AM

NGC 7727 is a peculiar spiral galaxy (SAB(s)a pec) located at a distance of 76 million light years from Earth. It has an apparent magnitude of 11.5 and occupies an area 4.7′ by 3.5′ in size.

 

The galaxy’s disturbed appearance, which is likely the result of a merger of two spiral galaxies about 1 billion years ago, has led to its inclusion in Halton Arp’s Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as Arp 222. NGC 7727 will likely become an elliptical galaxy in the future.



#13 brida1709a

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 01:05 AM

Other notable deep sky objects in Aquarius include the peculiar galaxy NGC 7257, lenticular galaxy NGC 7759, elliptical galaxy NGC 7600, the galaxy cluster Abell 2597, located about 1 billion light years from Earth, and SSA22-HCM1, an exceptionally luminous galaxy located at a distance of 12.66 billion light years, with an apparent magnitude of 26.6.



#14 KidOrion

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 09:01 AM

Thank you so much for this! This surely helps me discover newer objects I have never seen before. Who knew their would "Llamas" within the boundaries of Water Carrier smile.gif

"Look out! There are Llamas!"



#15 j.gardavsky

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 02:51 PM

Thank you so much for this! This surely helps me discover newer objects I have never seen before. Who knew their would "Llamas" within the boundaries of Water Carrier smile.gif

Sorry for my writing Lama (in German), in Englih they are llamas.

 

The Llama Head Nebula is really big, the best way to see it offer the binoculars.

 

(My present observing program are the molecular clouds, the large scale compression flows - streams in plain language, the Planck galactic cold clumps, the Lynds bright nebulae not included in other catalogs, the IFN.)

 

Enjoy Aquarius,

JG


Edited by j.gardavsky, 19 October 2021 - 02:51 PM.


#16 brida1709a

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 03:01 PM

Sorry for my writing Lama (in German), in Englih they are llamas.

 

The Llama Head Nebula is really big, the best way to see it offer the binoculars.

 

(My present observing program are the molecular clouds, the large scale compression flows - streams in plain language, the Planck galactic cold clumps, the Lynds bright nebulae not included in other catalogs, the IFN.)

 

Enjoy Aquarius,

JG

I'm wondering how large it is in degrees? Is this nebulous object easy to photograph?



#17 j.gardavsky

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 04:06 PM

I'm wondering how large it is in degrees? Is this nebulous object easy to photograph?

A very nice astrophoto of the Llama Head Nebula (MBM 47) is here

http://www.werbeagen...xi/gallery.html

and click on the annotation to see its position and extent.

 

Accordimg to the Lynds catalog, this LBN 117 is 360'x120' large.

According to my understanding, this nebula does not belong to the high galactic lattitude IFNs, but is it a part of a large scale compression flow of molecular clouds extending into Aquila. It also embraces a few Planck Galactic Cold Clumps.

 

The nebula has been best seen through the 10.5x70 binoculars, and also traced through the 15x85 binoculars.

 

It is a nice DSO off the beaten path,

JG


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