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Deep Space Objects that are very easy to find

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#26 AstroVPK

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Posted 13 October 2021 - 06:32 PM

Bortle 3-4


Most Messier objects are bright enough that you don't need charts to find them subsequently one you've found them the first time. For example, M74 is right next to Eta Piscium and is ready to find and see from Bortle 3/4 skies.

#27 Corcaroli78

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 01:17 AM

  I recommend Deep Sky Rieisatlas, even if you don't speak German.

 

Hello everyone, 

 

I am searching for Deep Space objects that you can find within seconds and without using a sky atlas. For example the Ring Nebula is located between two bright stars and it takes me less than 10 seconds to aim my telescope at it. I have 14 inches of aperture so I should be able to see some fainter objects too.

A good point to start is with a binocular observing list. They are usually defined for 50-70 mm binoculars. In most of my observations with telescope, my companion is a binocular astronomy book.

 

+1 Deep Sky Reiseatlas. is so intuitive! and the Deep Sky Reisefuhrer (the companion book) has sketches of the most relevant objects with different magnifications (10x - 120x) and apertures from binoculars to 120 mm.

 

Carlos


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#28 CRAZYeye29325

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 03:09 PM

Excel spreadsheet attached of Messier sorted by constellation. Stolen from a lot of other folks.

 

https://www.iau.org/...constellations/

 

Pdf links to constellations, starhopping maps and telrad maps.

 

Hopefully this works...

Attached Files


Edited by CRAZYeye29325, 14 October 2021 - 03:10 PM.


#29 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 09:37 PM

NGC 2024 (the Flame Nebula) lies just to the northeast of the second-magnitude star Alnitak.

 

https://www.constell...m/flame-nebula/

 

NGC 2024 “FLAME NEBULA” (diffuse emission/reflection nebula in Orion)

 

(10 inch f/5.6, 52x)

 

DEEP-SKY: (3) Noticeably improves the contrast with the dark lane-like detail visible.

 

UHC: (3) Darker than in Deep-sky but with only a slight increase in contrast.

 

OIII: (2) Darker than in UHC, with less detail than in UHC.

 

H-BETA: (1) Darkest of all three filters, but the nebula remains visible with detail similar to that of OIII.

 

RECOMMENDATION FOR NGC 2024: DEEP-SKY/UHC (near tie).

https://www.prairiea...common-nebulae/



#30 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 02:49 PM

M1 lies about one degree to the northwest of the third-magnitude star Zeta Tauri.

https://www.messier-...-1-crab-nebula/

 

M1 CRAB NEBULA (SNR in Taurus)

 

(10 inch f/5.6, 52x, 71x, 141x.)

 

DEEP-SKY: (3) Improves the contrast and brings out the wispy arc-like cusp on the eastern end.

 

UHC: (4) Darkens the background and reveals little hints of tattered detail on the edges with the eastern “cusp” now more visible.

 

OIII: (3) Much darker than in UHC, and appears slightly smaller and somewhat rounder, but with hints of filamentary detail on the edges and across the nebula at 141x.

 

H-BETA: (0) barely visible.

 

RECOMMENDATION FOR M1: UHC/DEEP-SKY (H-beta *not* recommended).

https://www.prairiea...common-nebulae/



#31 j.gardavsky

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 04:27 PM

Some point-and-shoot objects:

 

NGC 4236 GLX, Kappa Draconis

Sh2-132 Wolf-Rayet Nebula (OIII, H-Beta filters), Epsilon Cephei

Sh2-131 (IC 1396) Elephant Trunk Nebula, Mu Cephei, also with unaided eyes

IC 59, IC 63, nebulae (H-Beta filter), Gamma Cas

IC 1747 PN, Epsilon Cas

Me 2-2 PN, 5 Lacertae

NGC 7662 PN Blue Snawball, 13 Andromedae

NGC 7026 PN, 63 Cygni

NGC 6826 PN Blinking Planetary, 16 Cygni

NGC 4490 Cocoon Galaxy, Beta CVn

NGC 1499 California Nebula (H-Beta filter), also with unaided eyes

PGCC G111.32 -11.86 Planck Galactic Cold Clump if you can find Aveni Hunter 1, or move 3° north of Lambda And, should you be looking for something off the beaten path

Sh2-101 Tulip Nebula (H-Beta filter), E off Eta Cygni

Sh2-91 filaments crossing on the G65.3 +5.7 SNR (OIII filter), Phi Cygni

IC 443 and IC 444 SNR (OIII filter), Mu-Nu Geminorum

IC 405 (H-Beta filetr) and IC 410 (OIII filter) nebulae around Mel 31 in Auriga,

and lots more, see also the posts above,

 

JG


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#32 Voyager 3

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 04:57 AM

An excellent article by Bob King and a must read .

https://skyandtelesc...g-the-easy-way/


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#33 Tony Flanders

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 05:52 AM

Most Messier objects are bright enough that you don't need charts to find them subsequently one you've found them the first time. For example, M74 is right next to Eta Piscium and is ready to find and see from Bortle 3/4 skies.


I don't really agree with that statement. M74 is by some standards the faintest of the Messier objects, and even in a fairly big scope I have been known to sweep right over it at low power without noticing it under Bortle-4 skies. And it's pretty tricky to spot in a small scope (or binoculars) even under pristine skies.


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#34 Voyager 3

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 08:40 AM

Ok you've *found* the position of M74 . Now ask where is M74 lol.gif  . 


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#35 brentknight

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 09:32 AM

Ok you've *found* the position of M74 . Now ask where is M74 lol.gif  . 

Messier saw it, so why can't I!!!


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#36 rowdy388

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 11:16 AM

Messier saw it, so why can't I!!!

Interesting that he did spot M74 but missed others that were far easier. It is a big sky and conditions (even alertness) are constantly changing.

Messier did good regardless. It's good to have a few than are more challenging and leave a few of the goodies for the other catalogues.


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#37 DSOGabe

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 04:15 PM

I am mainly interested in fainter objects close to brighter stars. 

There are a lot of nice clusters near the main stars of Cassiopeia. 


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#38 Keith Rivich

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 09:04 PM

Hello everyone, 

 

I am searching for Deep Space objects that you can find within seconds and without using a sky atlas. For example the Ring Nebula is located between two bright stars and it takes me less than 10 seconds to aim my telescope at it. I have 14 inches of aperture so I should be able to see some fainter objects too.

I'm going to be the bad guy here...

 

Are you serious with this post? 

 

That's all. 

 

Back to the Astro's getting their tails kicked.


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#39 HotRod217

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Posted Yesterday, 10:28 AM

I'm going to be the bad guy here...

 

Are you serious with this post? 

 

That's all. 

 

Back to the Astro's getting their tails kicked.

What do you mean?



#40 Dave Mitsky

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Posted Yesterday, 02:08 PM

I don't really agree with that statement. M74 is by some standards the faintest of the Messier objects, and even in a fairly big scope I have been known to sweep right over it at low power without noticing it under Bortle-4 skies. And it's pretty tricky to spot in a small scope (or binoculars) even under pristine skies.

M74 was the most difficult Messier object for me to spot when I was working through the catalog.  However, from a good dark site it's not all that difficult to see with a small telescope.  I've also logged it with binoculars from such locations.



#41 Dave Mitsky

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Posted Yesterday, 02:15 PM

There are a lot of nice clusters near the main stars of Cassiopeia. 

M103 lies a degree east of the third-magnitude star Ruchbah (Delta Cassiopeiae).  



#42 Starman1

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Posted Yesterday, 03:19 PM

Hello everyone, 

 

I am searching for Deep Space objects that you can find within seconds and without using a sky atlas. For example the Ring Nebula is located between two bright stars and it takes me less than 10 seconds to aim my telescope at it. I have 14 inches of aperture so I should be able to see some fainter objects too.

M1, M2, M4, M5, M6, M7, M8, M11, M13, M15, M20, M21, M22, M24, M27, M28, M30, M31, M32, M35, M39, M41, M42, M43, M44, M45, M46, M47, M55, M57, M71, M74, M81, M82, M97, M108, M110

are all near naked eye stars where you can just move to the object from the star (almost all the above are visible to the naked eye in a dark sky).

Also:

NGC253, 7293, 869/884, 246, 7000, 1499, The Veil nebula (several NGC#s), 404, 2392, 7789, 457, 2024, and I could go on for a couple hundred others.

All are either right next to bright stars, or an easy interpolation between two naked eye stars (like M13 and M57)  or merely a 1-direction move from a bright star.

If you have a Telrad, that's all you need.  With a 50mm finder, the list would be in the hundreds.

 

Look at a star atlas, and look for objects within a couple degrees of a naked eye star.

Figure out the field size of your low power eyepiece and how many jumps it will take to get there.  Keep it to 2 or 3 max.

There will literally be hundreds of objects you can find.  Yes, hundreds.  In a 14", maybe thousands.

 

You will have to memorize the locations for the list you want to show others, but the star atlas is the starting point.

How else would you have known M57 is in between two naked eye stars?

So, the first time you look, use the atlas.  The next time, try it without an atlas.

You have a GoTo scope, though.  How long does it take you to punch in a number?

 

The first step is to memorize the constellations.  The 2nd step is to use an atlas to see what's there.  The 3rd step is to practice finding the objects.

After a few times, your "find in seconds" list will be growing by leaps and bounds.  I have an acquaintance whose "find in seconds" list is in the thousands.

He puts me to shame and I've been observing for 58 years.



#43 Keith Rivich

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Posted Yesterday, 05:50 PM

What do you mean?

You have a go-to 14" scope. 10's of thousands of DSO's are at your fingertips. Maybe its the way you framed the question. To me it sounds like "I want to look at DSO's but I do not want to put in the effort".

 

If I am mistaken I apologize. 




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