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What slammed the Sun?

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#1 Baatar

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 09:52 AM

I was observing the Sun in white light, and saw this!  A black spot with one concentric circle, like a whole Saturn slammed into the Sun.  

 

What is this?  Doesn't seem like a regular sun spot.  Sorry, could only take a mobile photo at the eyepiece.

 

20211014_164441.jpg


Edited by Baatar, 15 October 2021 - 03:59 AM.


#2 John Fitzgerald

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 09:55 AM

Looks like a sunspot near the limb, maybe a bit raised above the perceived surface. 


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#3 csrlice12

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:00 AM

That's the Sun's collimation spot.


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#4 Baatar

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:01 AM

Hi John,

It is not at or close to the limb. Am still observing it. Unfortunateky, mobile photo is not too clear.

It is a perfect round spot in the middle with a perfect concentric circle. Like a star test, or an airy disk.

Edited by Baatar, 14 October 2021 - 10:07 AM.


#5 csa/montana

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:04 AM

Moved to Solar Observing for better fit.



#6 Grounddweller

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:08 AM

I saw it as well, no more than an hour ago, sitting in the top 20% of the disc. My initial thought was the same as yours, that Saturn had been pushed onto the surface and the impression was still able to be seen.



#7 Gasplan1

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:14 AM

is that how big Saturn would be on Sun's surface? I thought Saturn would be bigger
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#8 james7ca

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:16 AM

If you are talking about the object that is near to the center, left-side limb of the sun (in your image) then that is just a sun spot (they can be almost any shape, circular, square looking, irregular).


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#9 Grounddweller

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:18 AM

That's the Sun's collimation spot.

lol.gif



#10 Tapio

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:18 AM

Sunspot 2882?
https://www.spacewea...t21/hmi1898.gif
Sunspot and penumbra.
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#11 havasman

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:24 AM

Sunspot 2882?
https://www.spacewea...t21/hmi1898.gif
Sunspot and penumbra.

That. It has crossed the face of the sun in plain sight and is leaving to look out the back side a while.

But who of us hasn't thought for just the flash of a split second that we've seen something exceptional and unique in the sky only to have it turn out to be business as usual for some object?


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#12 Baatar

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:26 AM

Am not sure it is a regular sun spot. The edges are very well defined and very sharp. At this angle, it is a well defined oval, face on, woul3cd be a perfect airy disk.

Am just seeing this for the first time in the last two years of observing sun. May be I am not knowledgeable about this phenomenon, just was curious to know what it was/is.

Anyway, appreciate for educating me.

.

Edited by Baatar, 14 October 2021 - 10:37 AM.


#13 csrlice12

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:30 AM

The yet to be determined if it's a planet called Vulcan?



#14 randcpoll

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:37 AM

That's the Sun's collimation spot.

Ha Ha! Love it!



#15 sc285

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:45 AM

pareidolia


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#16 Great Attractor

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:46 AM

Am not sure it is a regular sun spot. The edges are very well defined and very sharp.


Sunspots come in all shapes and sizes, that's the beauty of it. Also as nice circles like here. I have an image of a similar specimen, at a somewhat bigger image scale:

 

sunspot.jpg


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#17 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:54 AM

Am not sure it is a regular sun spot. The edges are very well defined and very sharp. At this angle, it is a well defined oval, face on, woul3cd be a perfect airy disk.

Am just seeing this for the first time in the last two years of observing sun. May be I am not knowledgeable about this phenomenon, just was curious to know what it was/is.

Anyway, appreciate for educating me.

.

 

The sunspot activity has been minimal for the past few years. Here's some incidental photos of sunspots taken with a hand held camera.

 

Partial Solar Eclipse Nexus 5.jpg
4163164-eclipse C-5.jpg
 
Jon

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#18 B 26354

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 11:06 AM

It's sunspot 2882. It's been crossing the face of the Sun for days.


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#19 Grounddweller

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 11:13 AM

Haven’t had the sun visible for days here…



#20 Tailspin45

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 11:37 AM

SOHO, the Solar & Heliospheric Observatory, is a spacecraft operated by ESA and NASA to study the Sun.

 

You can see realtime and historical images captured by the spacecraft at https://sohowww.nasc...ime-images.html

 

Images from space clearly show a umbra, penumnra, and plage characteristic of a uni-polar sunspot.

 

The sunspot is identified as AR2882. Visit spaceweather.com for more details.

 

Observers of any phenomenon do well to assume the most prosaic explanation. Only with extraordinary evidence can an extraordinary origin be postulated.

 

 

latest.jpg


Edited by Tailspin45, 15 October 2021 - 10:18 AM.

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#21 Tailspin45

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 11:46 AM

Looks like a sunspot near the limb, maybe a bit raised above the perceived surface. 

Sunspots are actually depressions. See https://ephemeris.sjaa.net/1209/b.html



#22 BFaucett

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 06:53 PM

skov-10-11-2021.jpg
 
Video: https://www.youtube....h?v=y3iR4o9R3eY
 
Space Weather News 10.11.2021
"A lot of exciting things are happening this week. We have a solar storm on its way to Earth now! It should hit later today and bring with it a good chance for aurora at mid-latitudes. It all started with region 2882 firing an M1.6-flare back on October 9, during which it launched a gorgeous full-halo eruption.  This solar storm has been driving a shockwave and a weak solar radiation storm that may impact amateur radio propagation and GPS reception over the next few days."
posted to YouTube on Oct 11, 2021
YouTube channel: TamithaSkov (link)

 

About Tamitha Skov:

https://en.wikipedia...ki/Tamitha_Skov

https://www.spacewea...m/meet-tamitha/

 
Cheers! Bob F.


Edited by BFaucett, 14 October 2021 - 07:09 PM.

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#23 David Knisely

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 11:21 PM

Sunspot 2882?
https://www.spacewea...t21/hmi1898.gif
Sunspot and penumbra.

Well, no, it is NOAA Active Region 12882 (sometimes abbreviated AR 2882).  Individual sunspots are not usually given NOAA active region (AR) numbers, as most contain more than one sunspot (in this case, AR 2882 contains three as of today). It is a simple Beta class active region that has a dominant leading spot showing a bit of the Wilson effect (looks like a depression in the photosphere).  Unfortunately, I am sitting under clouds until tomorrow afternoon at the earliest, and this group is heading over the limb, probably leaving us with a fairly blank solar disk.  Clear skies to you.


Edited by David Knisely, 14 October 2021 - 11:26 PM.


#24 ziggeman

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 03:53 AM

I watched the sun the other day. The 12th november I think.October I mean. (timemachine broken..) The ar2882 looked huge smile.gif projected the image from one of my old scopes , a newt 4.5" with a 20mm HM eyepiece 0.965 inch, on a piece of white cardboard. The 40 some year old japanese COCO- scope still works. collimated and cleaned. I'm Happy smile.gif


Edited by ziggeman, 15 October 2021 - 03:55 AM.


#25 Baatar

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 03:58 AM

Thanks to all.  Sunspots always looked having an irregular shape to me, and I never realized they could also be of such "un"-naturally regular shape or so I thought (ironically very natural now).

 

Always new to learn on this amazing forum!

 

.


Edited by Baatar, 15 October 2021 - 04:09 AM.

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