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Halos in 8mm Paradigm eye piece

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16 replies to this topic

#1 the Elf

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 07:04 AM

Hello all,

 

last night I tried observing Jupiter and Saturn using my GSO RC8 (instead of my TS ED 102mm F7 which is my observing scope) hoping for a better resolution than with the small scope. As the focal length is much longer I used a relatively long eye piece, the TS ED 8mm 60° aka Paradigm. There was an annoyingly bright large halo always concentric to Jupiter no matter where in the field I moved it. Is this eyepiece know for this kind of trouble? Or is the RC8 just a bad pairing to this eyepiece? The ES 82° 6.7mm did not show any halos so it is probably not the scope.

 

CS

the Elf



#2 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 07:12 AM

I have the 8mm Paradigm and have used it in quite a variety of scopes.  I have never noticed ghosting or haloing when viewing the planets. Last night I was using it with a 2X Barlow in my 120mm ED for 225x on Jupiter it was fine.

 

Jon


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#3 davidgmd

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 07:46 AM

I’ve seen that kind of halo around Jupiter a couple of times recently and it seemed to correlate with a high concentration of particulates in the atmosphere from the western US wildfires. It was visible to some degree with all eyepieces (more with higher magnification), so maybe not applicable to your situation.


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#4 droid

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 08:20 AM

id agree, its probably the atmosphere, my paradigm 8mm has never done that



#5 the Elf

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 10:33 AM

Thank you. This time of year there is always a small and sometimes a large amount of fog creeping down the hills. Any street light or car headlight comes with a light cone. Plus there had been thin high clouds which is also virtually a constant encounter in fill. I wonder why the halo was not there in the ES eyepiece. Maybe due to the larger magnification it was just dimmer and thus not so prominent. Hopefully conditions are better next time and I'll try it again.


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#6 russell23

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 10:45 AM

Another possible cause of that is fogging of the eyepiece.  If the evening is warm and humid enough the proximity of your eye to the eye lens can cause fogging of the eye lens. 


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#7 RandyRoast

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 06:17 PM

Oddly enough, in my 102mm mak I had this same issue ok Jupiter with my 12mm paradigm eyepiece (and didn’t have it with the 8mm paradigm eyepiece on the same evenings, so maybe you are right about the higher magnification). I thought I messed up the eyepiece in some way during cleaning or something else, but sure enough a couple weeks later the problem went away. So like others have said it sounds like the problem is with something other than the eyepiece. For my own situation, I always view with an annoyingly bright streetlight nearby but I’m thinking it had something to do with the particular angle on those nights.
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#8 RichA

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 12:38 AM

Years ago, there was an observing problem where this kind of thing showed up around bright stars and planets.  It was stratospheric volcanic dust.  Sunsets looked amazing through.


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#9 lylver

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 03:54 AM

I don't believe this is fogging in this eyepiece design that have each lens multi-layer coated.

BST-StarGuider.jpg

I saw fogging for objectives that have close radii and thin air-space.

Cause could be baffling of the eyepiece, for a 60° EP this is possible for a full positive design : so rare for this one. The diameter of the integrated barlow act as a first baffle with a long space between barlow and eye group : easier to control.

But this is not definitive, I saw reflection in a SPLER 5mm design (55°).

 

It is more probable that the halo comes from the instrument.

Baffling correctly a ritchey chretien astrophotographic design for planetary is a gageure



#10 the Elf

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 04:43 AM

There was a volcano eruption in Spain on Sept. 19. The initial ash cloud was 1500m high. They may well be some dust in the air. I did not come to my mind that this might affect my observing.

I posted another thread with a more general question and now I wonder if I should use the refractor for planetary. So I put a bunch of questions here:

https://www.cloudyni...umb/?p=11434794

Recommendations are welcome!


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#11 iseegeorgesstar

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 08:55 AM

Did you try using the eyepiece giving you trouble in another scope to see if the optical issue persisted? A few nights ago I had a halo around Jupiter for a short time in my 6mm bst planetary. It eventually disappeaed. There was haze in the sky that night and sometimes when you looked at Jupiter that night there was a glow around it visible to the naked eye. Perhaps the halo was an atmospheric artifact? 


Edited by iseegeorgesstar, 17 October 2021 - 08:56 AM.


#12 the Elf

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 12:38 PM

No, the clouds did not allow for anything at all. I think it was atmospheric given the recent volcano eruption in Spain. It is only now that I made that link. While I was observing I had forgotten about the eruption. If something is no longer on the news it is sort of "over". Might not be true.


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#13 davidgmd

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 11:35 PM

I found these maps helpful when trying to correlate the effect with atmospheric particulates because we are on the other side of the country where the smoke effect from our fires can vary significantly over time. The first is US only, the second is global:

https://fire.airnow.gov/#

https://www.windy.co...801,4,m:e38agrb

 

Dew can do this too, as noted by russell23. When that has happened to me it quickly went from bad to worse and wiped out the view - much more than a flare of white around the planet. I could see the dew on the eyepiece with a red light. Prompted me to get an eyepiece dew heater strip.



#14 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 03:27 AM

This evening it was clear, the seeing pretty decent. I had my 10 inch F/5 Dob out and I was using a Paracorr.  

 

Viewing Jupiter and Saturn, I specifically looked for signs of haloing or ghosting in the 8mm Paradigm, I saw none and it was nice and sharp across the field. 

 

One data point.

 

Jon


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#15 astrophile

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 08:59 PM

I'm not familiar with the eyepiece in question but if it has tighter eye relief than the ES 6.7, I'm going with russell23's theory.  Especially in the atmospheric conditions you describe.  Whenever I start noticing such a halo with my Nagler Zoom, it's due to the eye lens starting to fog from my eyeball's close proximity.


Edited by astrophile, 19 October 2021 - 08:59 PM.

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#16 vtornado

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Posted 20 October 2021 - 12:01 PM

Did you cup your hands round the eyepiece? 

 

I sometimes have external light sneaking in the side and bouncing off the eyelens.

 

eyelash oil on the eyelens can also cause a halo around small bright objects.



#17 the Elf

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Posted 20 October 2021 - 05:03 PM

No, I have the Alpine spot bandit that block out light very efficiently. I really think it is related to the volcano eruption but I just did see the link when I put the question. Maybe I should be happy about all the rain because it might clean the air for a better observation one fine day when the rain stops in March or so. As soon as I have an opportunity to observe again I will report.

Thank you all for your replies!




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