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One of America's oldest photos is of Henry Fitz (scope maker)

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#1 RichA

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 06:16 PM

https://www.dpreview...hop-in-new-york

 

 


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#2 DSOs4Me

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 06:37 PM

Very Cool waytogo.gif



#3 JamesMStephens

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 07:46 PM

He looks vaguely like Charlton Heston in the image with his eyes closed, and his wife is quite lovely.

 

Jim



#4 petert913

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 07:59 PM

He has a very modern face and haircut.



#5 RichA

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 12:17 AM

You don't see many Fitz refractors as some other antique brands.  Probably he didn't make as many small ones as Clark and they predate them.

 

https://www.lyonandt...lot=181770&sd=1


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#6 Terra Nova

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 09:50 AM

Possibly the very first selfie! ;)


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#7 steve t

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 02:47 PM

funnypost.gif


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#8 Ken Launie

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 09:00 PM

Many claim that the Henry Fitz self-portrait is the first image taken of a person ever. It's very possible, but I think it's hard to prove. He ran a portrait studio in Baltimore after his collaboration with Wolcott and Johnson, for a time, at the dawn of photography. In fact their camera was essentially an astrograph, with a very short focus parabolic mirror and the photographic plate at prime focus. Often Fitz studio portraits have his name punched in tiny block letters on the copper frame surrounding the image. Not many survive. Also, I suspect that the reason they stopped using the mirror system is the aberrations you'd see in such a fast system. No coma correctors back then!

 

Daguerreotype plates have extraordinarily low speed, with an ISO of something like 0.05 (Tri-X back in the day was 400). The novelty was that the fast reflecting optical system allowed for shorter exposures than typical slower lenses of the time. What's less well understood is that, unlike "typical" Daguerreotypes, the image formed was not left-right reversed.

 

Later Daguerreotypes that show say, building signs or advertisements need to be viewed in a mirror to read correctly. The light hits the coated copper/silver plate, and after processing the image is viewed from the same side, causing the reversal. The later Polaroid cameras like the SX-70 (with integral, non peel-apart film) have an internal mirror to perform the reversal internally to get a correct-reading picture.

 

Digital cameras perform the reversal electronically so you get a correct image, and negative and slide film expose from one side and the image is printed from the other to counteract the reversal.

 

--Ken


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