Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Noob's First Polar Allignment

  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 David I

David I

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 144
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2020
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 18 October 2021 - 09:02 PM

Total noob here.Yesterday I was practicing polar allignment for the first time according to all the instructions with my EQ6-R and so I first found polaris on my phone’s Stellarium but nothing in the polar scope.  All I could see through the polar scope were  very faint stars,  I gave up and I’m planning  on getting the ‘Polar Aligner Pro’ for my android.

 
So tonight I took things into my own hands and used the polar scope like a spotting scope and voila ! I saw the moon ,jupiter and polaris very bright clear and in focus through the polar scope. Nothing wrong with the polarscope.  I think it’s a good idea to get the  Polar Alligner Pro to get a pretty good polar allignment and then easily I could check the polar scope an adjust  to get it even better .  Also the front yard has no polaris view so  I will need to use this App.  I will report as things develop , like getting my first scope in a few days. Thanks for reading.
David

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • EQ6-R.jpg

  • jerahian likes this

#2 DJL

DJL

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 979
  • Joined: 15 Aug 2020

Posted 18 October 2021 - 09:22 PM

Walk around until you can see Polaris. Then make sure you can see it at your viewing position. I find Sun Surveyor app good for showing the position of the Pole. Kudos for using the EQ6-R mount head as a kettlebell:-)


Edited by DJL, 18 October 2021 - 09:38 PM.

  • David I likes this

#3 Paul Sweeney

Paul Sweeney

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 701
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Heidelberg, Germany

Posted 22 October 2021 - 02:31 AM

Polar alignment is only concerns your mount and Polaris. The App adds an extra variable to the equation that only complicates things right now. Apps rely on your device's internal compass and level, which may not be all that accurate. You should learn how to do it manually. Once you've done it a few times you'll have it down pat.

When you have Polaris nicely dialed in, you can see if the App is giving you the same readings. If not, then either the polar scope is out of alignment, or the App is wrong.

When I view from home, I cannot see Polaris. I've found that I can estimate it close enough that it works well for both manual and GoTo operations, but not for photography.

If you are viewing from a driveway, you can mark the position of the tripod's legs after getting a good setup (assuming you can't see Polaris). This makes future setups much easier.
  • SeaBee1 and David I like this

#4 TheUser

TheUser

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 286
  • Joined: 15 Nov 2020

Posted 22 October 2021 - 02:59 AM

Also the front yard has no polaris view so  I will need to use this App.

am I see you right, your observation site has no access to the part of sky where Polaris is?
 



#5 Kon Dealer

Kon Dealer

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,026
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2011
  • Loc: Cambridge UK

Posted 23 October 2021 - 01:49 PM

I gave up long ago.
Polar alignment and EQ mounts are a sure-fire recipe for frustration and insanity.


  • David I likes this

#6 David I

David I

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 144
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2020
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 23 October 2021 - 03:25 PM

am I see you right, your observation site has no access to the part of sky where Polaris is?
 

Yes I can't get polaris in the front yard because the house is in the way , only in the backyard.


  • TheUser likes this

#7 JG-42N

JG-42N

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 57
  • Joined: 14 Oct 2018
  • Loc: Iowa

Posted 23 October 2021 - 03:50 PM

I don't know that particular mount, but mine is the Orion version of the EQ5 and I believe they work in a similar fashion using the SynScan hand control.  The hand control has an option do polar alignment without being able to see Polaris.  You level the mount, set the elevation to your latitude, and point it as close to North as you can estimate.  Then do a two-star alignment.  Then you can use the Polar Alignment option to guide you in setting the azimuth and elevation settings on the mount.  There are more advanced/accurate methods to try, but this works pretty well to start with.  I do recommend a reticle eyepiece to accurately center the alignment stars, but a zoom eyepiece or switching to a higher power to fine tune centering works ok too.


  • SeaBee1 likes this

#8 Paul Sweeney

Paul Sweeney

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 701
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Heidelberg, Germany

Posted 23 October 2021 - 11:25 PM

If you have a high power eyepiece with a 50° field of view (a standard Plossl eyepiece), then you can defocus the star until it a large disc. Then center the disc in the eyepiece. If you can get the disk close to the total field of view, then it is quite obvious if it is not centered.

When you set up any EQ mount, there is always the chance that the mount is not pointing exactly North, and that the scope is not exactly parallel to the mount. The GoTo software compensates for this, so a super alignment is not really necessary as long as your star alignment is well done. They have done tests in Sky and Telescope, I believe it was, where they pointed the mount East, did a 3 star alignment, and the GoTo worked good enough for visual.

Edited by Paul Sweeney, 23 October 2021 - 11:33 PM.


#9 TheUser

TheUser

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 286
  • Joined: 15 Nov 2020

Posted 24 October 2021 - 03:15 AM

altitude of the Polaris is the same as your place' latitude; it's azimuth is almost same as North direction.

 

so using the compass you can align the azimuth. for the altitude alignment use the gradation on the mount (or make it).

 

magnetic North not quite the same is astronomical "North" but the difference is not so big (you even can add correction to compass data).



#10 kathyastro

kathyastro

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,838
  • Joined: 23 Dec 2016
  • Loc: Nova Scotia

Posted 24 October 2021 - 06:23 AM

magnetic North not quite the same is astronomical "North" but the difference is not so big (you even can add correction to compass data).

While that may be true where you live, and is, I believe, true where the OP lives, it is a poor generalization.  There are places in North America where the difference between magnetic north and true north is more than 20 degrees.  That is enough to interfere with even visual observing.  If you use a compass for finding north, always apply a correction to find true north.


  • CeeKay likes this

#11 David I

David I

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 144
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2020
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 24 October 2021 - 08:58 AM

Thank you all for your responses , last night I tried polar alignment, mostly with the Polar Alligner Pro on my phone to get a rough alignment. Controlling the Synscan  on the mount is 'work in progress' , I only understood how to  to use the controls for manual slewing. I only had time to set up and manually slew to Jupiter and Saturn  at 150X and 375X with the SW Evostar 120mm.

After more experience I should do a first light review on the scope and equipment . In a nutshell scope and focuser is great, I was surprised at the jitteriness of the view at 150X , overall I did not have any wow moments and somewhat disappointed , I have to lower my expectations. I was very happy that my 25 year old daughter had wow moments and tried to take pics with her phone of the planets. 

     

David



#12 TheUser

TheUser

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 286
  • Joined: 15 Nov 2020

Posted 24 October 2021 - 09:21 AM

While that may be true where you live, and is, I believe, true where the OP lives, it is a poor generalization.  There are places in North America where the difference between magnetic north and true north is more than 20 degrees.  That is enough to interfere with even visual observing.  If you use a compass for finding north, always apply a correction to find true north.

it looks like exception and not so common



#13 scopewizard

scopewizard

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 645
  • Joined: 04 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Alberta, Canada

Posted 24 October 2021 - 09:36 AM

it looks like exception and not so common

Wrong, I am a retired pilot. It is everywhere.

 

read this,

https://www.geomag.n...d/magdec-en.php


  • kathyastro likes this

#14 TheUser

TheUser

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 286
  • Joined: 15 Nov 2020

Posted 24 October 2021 - 12:16 PM

Wrong, I am a retired pilot. It is everywhere.

 

read this,

https://www.geomag.n...d/magdec-en.php

the talk is about huge deviation (about 20 degrees and more) which makes EQ-mount alignment problematic. and no need to compare aircraft navigation with amateur astronomy. through time topic starter can make alignment more precise but even rough setting is enough to go for the first time of visual observations.

 

so your attempt of mocking me is not successful.


Edited by TheUser, 24 October 2021 - 01:20 PM.


#15 bytesbull

bytesbull

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 65
  • Joined: 13 Jul 2021
  • Loc: Arkansas, USA

Posted 24 October 2021 - 12:22 PM

google is the answer.... I got my sea level and RA just using my zip code online and was able to get my EQ at 46.7 and now just put it in the general direction of north when I view and one knob keeps things fine... just turn that one knob a little every couple of minutes when deep sky or lots more when x225 magnify.

 

If you have an EQ mount take the time to learn how to use it and you will love it.


  • Peter_D likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics