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Got a new MyT...what to do for the next two weeks?

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#1 scottdevine

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 10:55 AM

Hi Everyone,

 

I just got myself a new Paramount MyT. 

 

Unfortunately the weather forecast is terrible for the next couple of weeks and I don't expect to have any clear skies.  Other than the obvious reading of the manual, software installation and basic equipment set up, is there anything those that have experience with the mount recommend I do inside with the mount before I get it outside?  I would love to get anything done that I can to make my first clear nights as productive as possible.

 

Thanks in advance!

Scott



#2 photoracer18

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 11:03 AM

That's normal when you buy a nice mount. I would spend time practicing with it indoors.


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#3 jmarin

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 11:32 AM

Scott,

 

First of all, congrats on the new mount!. I've had one for a bit over a year, and it's great. I would emphasize reading the manual, which you've mentioned. This mount leverages TheSkyX software, which is a complicated beast (both in a good and bad way). Make sure you get the hang of it, practice indoors as suggested.

 

I would make sure you configure TheSkyX to work with all of your devices: mount, camera, focuser, rotator (if you have one), etc. You might end up using TheSkyX as a "mount driver" but it's also useful to have everything configured for running TPoint models or training PEC. Make sure that you can slew the mount, take a picture, move the focuser, etc.

 

And then for your first light, I would practice the following and expect to spend the first night(s) doing this (this will become routine). I assume you already have decent focused stars for this

 

1. TPoint modelling. Do a rough polar alignment (eyeball it if necessary) and run a TPoint model. Besides reading the manual, this video is useful --> https://www.youtube....h?v=4pbgJ24_01I. Start with a medium sized model for now (~40-50 points) to give you a nice result without taking too much time to complete.

2. Once you have that, perform an accurate polar alignment with the assistant in TheSkyX. You may end up not doing this (i.e. use Polemaster or other PA technique) but I think it's good to learn how to do this, and the results are great

3. Train the PEC in your mount. This is a bit involved but will transform your mount from pretty decent to awesome if you get it right, and you only need to do it once (well, maybe once a year after maintenance). Besides the manual, there is this video (https://www.youtube....bjIOWWO0&t=394s) which explains the overall process quite well, but uses the "old" method (it's worth watching though). The new method for training your PEC is described here --> https://www.bisque.com/train-pec/

 

Overall I would say take your time with the mount, Paramounts are not as easy to use as others (but they are more powerful than many, thanks to the software integration). I also have a CEM70 that I use successfully and I never read the manual. With the MyT that was not the case and I'm still learning new things

 

Enjoy!


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#4 ChrisMoses

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 11:54 AM

#1 read Ken Sturrock's guides at https://github.com/k...New_User_Guides

 

#2 Simulate your workflow as much as possible indoors.  The new ascom sky  simulator can help a lot.

 

#3 decide if you want to use Voyager.  Many people, including myself use it to control tsx.  It has a few advantages:

   A.  Multi-target shooting.

   B. really, really precise control over what is and is going to happen.

   C.  Great error handling

   D.  Easy scripting

   E.  Some people, like myself, think its autofocus routines are better - they are definitely faster

   F.  Search CN for info on Voyager.  There is a lot of good stuff here.

 

#4 Set your slew limits so you don't have any mount strikes

 

#5.  Take the time to really read the MyT section on the Bisque forum.  There is a wealth of knowledge there.

 

#6.  I've been working on some flowcharts for common activities.  Let me know if you want them.

 

#7 - Most Important - Don't stress out!! TSX and the MyT are big systems!  They are great, but the learning curve can look large at first.  It really isn't that bad

 

Keep us posted about your progress, and feel free to ask questions.  I've only had mine a few months - so I know what you are going through. 

 

Thanks,

Chris



#5 scottdevine

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 12:06 PM

Scott,

 

First of all, congrats on the new mount!. I've had one for a bit over a year, and it's great. I would emphasize reading the manual, which you've mentioned. This mount leverages TheSkyX software, which is a complicated beast (both in a good and bad way). Make sure you get the hang of it, practice indoors as suggested.

 

I would make sure you configure TheSkyX to work with all of your devices: mount, camera, focuser, rotator (if you have one), etc. You might end up using TheSkyX as a "mount driver" but it's also useful to have everything configured for running TPoint models or training PEC. Make sure that you can slew the mount, take a picture, move the focuser, etc.

 

And then for your first light, I would practice the following and expect to spend the first night(s) doing this (this will become routine). I assume you already have decent focused stars for this

 

1. TPoint modelling. Do a rough polar alignment (eyeball it if necessary) and run a TPoint model. Besides reading the manual, this video is useful --> https://www.youtube....h?v=4pbgJ24_01I. Start with a medium sized model for now (~40-50 points) to give you a nice result without taking too much time to complete.

2. Once you have that, perform an accurate polar alignment with the assistant in TheSkyX. You may end up not doing this (i.e. use Polemaster or other PA technique) but I think it's good to learn how to do this, and the results are great

3. Train the PEC in your mount. This is a bit involved but will transform your mount from pretty decent to awesome if you get it right, and you only need to do it once (well, maybe once a year after maintenance). Besides the manual, there is this video (https://www.youtube....bjIOWWO0&t=394s) which explains the overall process quite well, but uses the "old" method (it's worth watching though). The new method for training your PEC is described here --> https://www.bisque.com/train-pec/

 

Overall I would say take your time with the mount, Paramounts are not as easy to use as others (but they are more powerful than many, thanks to the software integration). I also have a CEM70 that I use successfully and I never read the manual. With the MyT that was not the case and I'm still learning new things

 

Enjoy!

Thanks so much for this excellent advice.

 

I've never worked with TSX before but based upon experience with other astrophotography software, I don't expect it to be simple.  Sounds like that will be the best use of indoor time.



#6 ChrisMoses

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 12:11 PM

How do you do polar alignment right now, with your current set-up?

 

Personally, for night one outdoors I would probably:

1. Set-up

2. Do PA however you are used to doing it

3. shoot some images and get used to things.

 

Night 2:

Add doing a t-point after a very good PA.  No need to do a giant one.  Maybe just 45-60

 

Night 3:

MAYBE add tracking - depends on your FL. I shoot at FL=530, so I don't need it

 

If you let us know the scope and other equipment, we can offer a bit better advise.  People usually just add it to there signature.


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#7 scottdevine

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 12:14 PM

#1 read Ken Sturrock's guides at https://github.com/k...New_User_Guides

 

#2 Simulate your workflow as much as possible indoors.  The new ascom sky  simulator can help a lot.

 

#3 decide if you want to use Voyager.  Many people, including myself use it to control tsx.  It has a few advantages:

   A.  Multi-target shooting.

   B. really, really precise control over what is and is going to happen.

   C.  Great error handling

   D.  Easy scripting

   E.  Some people, like myself, think its autofocus routines are better - they are definitely faster

   F.  Search CN for info on Voyager.  There is a lot of good stuff here.

 

#4 Set your slew limits so you don't have any mount strikes

 

#5.  Take the time to really read the MyT section on the Bisque forum.  There is a wealth of knowledge there.

 

#6.  I've been working on some flowcharts for common activities.  Let me know if you want them.

 

#7 - Most Important - Don't stress out!! TSX and the MyT are big systems!  They are great, but the learning curve can look large at first.  It really isn't that bad

 

Keep us posted about your progress, and feel free to ask questions.  I've only had mine a few months - so I know what you are going through. 

 

Thanks,

Chris

Wow!  Super helpful!

 

#1 looks great.  I'll get after reading that right away.

 

#3 - I am a NINA user.  I love the advanced sequencer.  Just makes more sense to me.  Found this to help with the set up - https://rockchucksum...-with-theskyx/ 

 

#4 - This one has me nervous and I definitely plan on figuring this out inside.  I have can set up the pier in my basement and will make sure I get these limits nailed down before it ever gets used in the dark!

 

#6 - I would really appreciate your flowcharts.  That is very in line with my way of processing info. :)

 

#7 - Most important advice of all.  This hobby is full of false starts and learning opportunities.  Also a lot of fun gear and exciting outputs when it all works.  Patience is definitely required! 

 

Thanks again!

Scott



#8 scottdevine

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 12:22 PM

How do you do polar alignment right now, with your current set-up?

 

Personally, for night one outdoors I would probably:

1. Set-up

2. Do PA however you are used to doing it

3. shoot some images and get used to things.

 

Night 2:

Add doing a t-point after a very good PA.  No need to do a giant one.  Maybe just 45-60

 

Night 3:

MAYBE add tracking - depends on your FL. I shoot at FL=530, so I don't need it

 

If you let us know the scope and other equipment, we can offer a bit better advise.  People usually just add it to there signature.

Really good advice.   Baby steps.

 

I now am the proud owner of a Paramount MyT.  I have a SW Esprit80D with a Pegasus Astro FocusCubev2.  I am using a ZWO ASI183MM camera, ZWO filter wheel and OAG with a ASI290MM Mini.  My new "travel" mount is the SW HEQ5.

 

Currently I polar align the HEQ5 with an iPolar.  Super easy and seems to give me good results.   Unfortunately I don't think there is any way to attach the iPolar to the MyT.  If you know how please let me know. 

 

I was planning on trying the "Accurate Polar Alignment" function in TSX to do the polar alignment.  I'm sure it's not as easy as the manual says, but I don't think I have other options unless I want to by a Polemaster. 

 

p.s. I will add a signature moving forward


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#9 ChrisMoses

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Posted 22 October 2021 - 12:33 PM

The only problem with using TPoint to do an accurate PA is, at least the first few times you do it, is you really have to re-run the tpoint to make sure you turned the knobs the correct direction.  Personally, I just use SharpCap's PA routine.  I have a wide enough main scope that it work fine.  Your 80 should be great for it. It is fast and gives you feedback as you move the knobs/wheels.  For $29you can't beat it.

 

I'll probably switch to using tpoint PA at some point, but there is no hurry. Actually, no I won't - I see no reason to switch right now, lol. 

 

When I do a really good PA in SharpCap, and then run a tpoint model, it always says my PA is very good.

 

Also, you will love the way the MyT adjusts and holds PA.  It it just a quality piece of equipment.

 

At some point you will need to do a PEC.  It does make a big difference, so don't judge the mount until you get one done.  Having said that.  A night or two of getting use to things without having done one isn't the worst thing.

 

Keep in mind that with the latest daily build of TSX, doing PEC is easier.  It takes care of more of the process automatically.  I'm stuck out of town right now so I haven't had a chance to try it, but based on the Bisque forum it sounds like a nice improvement.




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