Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

10” Newt with goto?

  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 RazorbackWatcher

RazorbackWatcher

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 40
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2020
  • Loc: NWA

Posted 23 October 2021 - 08:39 AM

I have an ES 10” DOB.
Don’t like the fact that I have to squat or get down on the ground to view.
Star hopping requires a contortionist.
Too sensitive to touch.

Primarily a visual observer but I’d love to try some simple AP (lunar, planet Messier objects).

Is there such a thing as 10” Newt on EQ mount with goto?

#2 MrRoberts

MrRoberts

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,110
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Green Valley, AZ

Posted 23 October 2021 - 08:47 AM

I have seen it done, but requires a hefty mount (CEM70 class mount or better)



#3 matt_astro_tx

matt_astro_tx

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,008
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2021
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 23 October 2021 - 08:56 AM

For strictly visual, the ATM mount linked in my signature is the solution I went with.  It is strictly a manually operated mount, although I do use it to shoot planetary images with.  Adding RA tracking to it has proven to be an undertaking that I haven't yet had the time for.  But again, for visual use it's wonderful.



#4 iantaylor2uk

iantaylor2uk

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 120
  • Joined: 19 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Chester, UK

Posted 23 October 2021 - 09:20 AM

You can buy an EQ mount with Goto (EQ6R, losmandy G11, etc.) and then put a 10" Newtonian on it, yes.

#5 TelescopeGreg

TelescopeGreg

    Soyuz

  • -----
  • Posts: 3,726
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2018
  • Loc: Auburn, California, USA

Posted 23 October 2021 - 01:30 PM

I've felt your pain.  8" f/5 Newtonian was my first scope.  AVX mount.  They never tell you that required accessories include a yoga mat, knee pads, and a step ladder.

 

One thing I've seen done is to attach an extra mounting ring to your OTA just above and flush with one of the two main support rings.  Leave it otherwise unattached.  It becomes a "stop" that allows you to loosen the support rings so you can spin the OTA around to a more comfortable viewing angle, without having it slide backward. 

 

When imaging, don't forget to spin it back to where the focuser / camera is positioned down and parallel to the counterweight shaft.  That's the orientation with the best balance and least inertia.


Edited by TelescopeGreg, 23 October 2021 - 01:32 PM.


#6 junomike

junomike

    ISS

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 21,899
  • Joined: 07 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Ontario

Posted 24 October 2021 - 05:30 AM

IME a Newt on a EQ/GEM requires rotating rings to better position the eyepiece location.



#7 luxo II

luxo II

    Aurora

  • ****-
  • Posts: 4,688
  • Joined: 13 Jan 2017
  • Loc: Sydney, Australia

Posted 24 October 2021 - 06:11 AM

Don’t like the fact that I have to squat or get down on the ground to view.

Hang on, there's something wrong here - a dob eyepiece is up the top, so why are you down on the ground ? To find stuff ? There are solutions for that.

 

As per above, imaging with a Newtonian on a GEM usually means the camera is in the worst possible place where you simply cannot look through it, which means another smaller scope is needed piggyback, or an EQ mount with quite accurate GOTO.

 

There are a lot of mechanical short-cuts that are fine on a dob OTA that don't work on an equatorial mount.

 

Your OTA must not flex around the dec axis, and most dobs are not stiff enough in this respect. And you probably ought to look at the primary mirror cell too and make sure the mirror won't flop in various orientations, or fall forwards.


Edited by luxo II, 24 October 2021 - 06:18 AM.

  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#8 RazorbackWatcher

RazorbackWatcher

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 40
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2020
  • Loc: NWA

Posted 24 October 2021 - 08:45 AM

Maybe i'm not being clear or asking the right questions.

Please see picture for reference:

gallery_353132_15568_24866.jpg

 

Anything lower than zenith and I have to hunch over, get down on my knees or sit on the ground to view the object.

If I want to star hop, then I have to perform my favorite cirque-de-soli routine in order to look through red-dot to find the next target. I do have a telrad (not mounted) but I don't think that solves that problem. I have thought about adding a RACI but I've been told that I don't want to do that (weight considerations maybe).

I wouldn't mind the sensitivity so much if I did have to feel like a contortionist to look through the eye piece.

 

Please excuse the mess, the room is a wreck.

 

I am contemplating going a different route all together for a second scope (SCT or reflector?) and looking to maybe build a 'platform' to get the DOB off the ground. I believe there are plenty of ideas out there for that. 

 



#9 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 96,053
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 24 October 2021 - 08:51 AM

I have an ES 10” DOB.
Don’t like the fact that I have to squat or get down on the ground to view.
Star hopping requires a contortionist.
Too sensitive to touch.

 

Anything lower than zenith and I have to hunch over, get down on my knees or sit on the ground to view the object.

 

 

Are you using a dedicated adjustable observing chair?  For just about any telescope and a 10 inch Dob in particular, an adjustable observing chair is part of the equation.

 

A Starbound chair is about $150 or so. I bought my first one about 20 years ago.  I have a lot of astro-gear.. it's the only piece of gear I use every night regardless of the telescope(s) I am using that night.  With an adjustable chair, the eyepiece, the finder, it is always at the right height, your upper body and head are steady. 

 

4964478-12.5 inch Dob at 45 deg sitting on the Starbound.jpg
 
You would want one with an SCT, with a 10 inch F/5 on a Gem.. This is an 8 inch F/5:
 
4238825-jon at that Konus on a starbound chair.jpg
 
A 10 inch Newtonians on a GEM are a poor fit.. a real hassle..  

 

Jon



#10 RazorbackWatcher

RazorbackWatcher

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 40
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2020
  • Loc: NWA

Posted 24 October 2021 - 09:20 AM

In the previous image, the eyepiece is 32" off the ground.

I literally have to sit on the ground to see the eye piece.

 

I am aware of the Starbound chair's and I agree that it would be a good addition......for something higher than 32"......



#11 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 96,053
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 24 October 2021 - 09:36 AM

In the previous image, the eyepiece is 32" off the ground.

I literally have to sit on the ground to see the eye piece.

 

I am aware of the Starbound chair's and I agree that it would be a good addition......for something higher than 32"......

 

:waytogo:

 

Looking at your photo, I see what I consider a major flaw, the focuser is horizontal, it points straight out the side.  This indeed does make viewing at lower elevations very awkward and uncomfortable. I don't know how difficult it would be to change that, rotating the upper cage 45 degrees would be a major improvement.  

 

I am 6 feet tall and view the entire sky rather easily seated on a Starbound chair. If you look at my photo, you will see I am looking down into the eyepiece rather than scrunched down and trying to look through it horizontally.  

 

The only Dob I have with a horizontal focuser is my 22 inch.  With a ladder scope, the horizontal focuser is a necessity, an angled focuser makes the distance to the eyepiece too great.  But at 10 degrees elevation, because of it's 8 ft focal length, it is usable with a Starbound chair, the eyepiece height is about 40 inches. 

 

Jon


  • PatrickVt likes this

#12 astrohamp

astrohamp

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 534
  • Joined: 01 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 24 October 2021 - 09:48 AM

Some folks have put long top and bottom dovetail plates on their Newt rings to add rigidity and avoid sag.  Also a third ring at the focuser to decrease flexure there.

I located and acquired a 10" aluminum tubed 8+" Newt to avoid flexure and to try some camera work with the design.  I had the "bigger boat" to drive it with already.  At about 35 pounds it is approaching my upper limit on portability, especially due to the 200+ foot walk required for nightly deployment.  I need a bigger Telegizmo 365.

It is set up for 'remote' EAA observing since I have become a bit of an insect paranoid, find that the local four footers passing by freak me out, and am less enjoying 'suiting up' for local conditions when no one else is around.



#13 RazorbackWatcher

RazorbackWatcher

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 40
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2020
  • Loc: NWA

Posted 24 October 2021 - 09:57 AM

...the focuser is horizontal...rotating the upper cage 45 degrees would be a major improvement.


The OTA in its current configuration would only accommodate 90* adjustments.
but I may be able to take take it apart and tap/drill new holes at 45*....my wife is going to kill me if I mess this up.


...I'm still getting the second scope...
  • Jon Isaacs likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics