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Update on the mount for my Jaegers 6-inch f/10

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#1 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:32 PM

I've finished the upgrades to the Meade 826 mount with a Mathis worm gear/clutch. The folks on the Classics Forum ID'd both the mount and the worm in this thread. And I posted about it a while ago here on the ATM/DIY Forum, too. I'm starting a new thread just to show the completed mount with the scope riding it.

 

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#2 Couder

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:40 PM

Nice setup.



#3 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:41 PM

That first image shows the whole kit, with the scope I made way back when in 2012. But here's a closer view of the mount itself, showing how I cut away some of the aluminum in order to view at up to about 45 degrees latitude (I live at 44). You can also see that I've added a Dec motor to the tangent arm. I got the 12vdc 2rpm motor for about $12 on eBay. I had some 45 degree gears and found that using them allowed for mounting the motor out of the way of anything vital.

 

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#4 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:41 PM

That first image shows the whole kit, with the scope I made way back when in 2012. But here's a closer view of the mount itself, showing how I cut away some of the aluminum in order to view at up to about 45 degrees latitude (I live at 44). You can also see that I've added a Dec motor to the tangent arm. I got the 12vdc 2rpm motor for about $12 on eBay. I had some 45 degree gears and found that using them allowed for mounting the motor out of the way of anything vital.

 

2.jpg


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#5 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:43 PM

Rats! Sorry for the double post!

 

Here's a closer view of the Dec motor setup. I knew it wouldn't mesh perfectly all the way around, so I made it to be spring loaded for a bit of give.

 

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#6 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:47 PM

One more view, showing how I used some flexible plastic, taken from the lid to an ice cream bucket, to connect the aluminum 'nut' on the 1/4 x 28 threaded rod to the tangent arm. There had been a thin piece of metal here originally, but it had broken, from the flexing it had gone through over time in this position. The plastic works fine, and like the spring, has some give to it.

 

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#7 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:52 PM

Both the AC synchronous motor for the RA and the 12vdc reversible motor for the Dec are controlled by this Meade drive corrector, given to me by a generous CN'er. Calling it a 'corrector' is accurate: this isn't meant for any kid of slewing, just for centering objects in the field of view. Which it does now very well, and very quietly. When I first tested the Dec motor, I thought it wasn't working,it was so silent!

 

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#8 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:54 PM

A very nice thing about the drive corrector is that it can run on 12 volts DC or 110 volts AC. The person who sent to me even included a case.

 

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#9 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:55 PM

Here's an image of the other side of the mount.

 

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#10 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:56 PM

And a close-up of the RA AC motor. Someone on one of the other threads said these round Bristol motors were often used by Cave.

 

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#11 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:58 PM

Another view of the worm/clutch end.

 

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#12 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:05 PM

I replaced all of the original rusting steel bits with stainless steel wherever I could, and the person I bought the mount from had already replaced both the 1-inch RA and Dec shafts with stainless. I tapped a hole into the end of the RA shaft for a 'toe-saver' bolt, which was about the most difficult thing I did. Stainless steel is hard! You can see in some of the photos that I also made counterweight supports out of 1-1/4 inch nuts. These, and the barbell counterweights themselves, are some of the only bits that are not now stainless steel or aluminum.

 

The mount seller had made oak legs for the tripod out of wood from trees in his yard. They worked, but had some flaws. I re-made four out of the six of them with store-bought oak.

 

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#13 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:09 PM

Here's a closer shot of the eyepiece holder/pressure plate that I also made out of oak. I make one of these for all of the tripods I acquire that don't already have them. Tightening the wing nut underneath the plate pushes out against the legs, which are held in check by the chain I added further down the legs. It makes for a very solid platform.

 

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#14 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:10 PM

It doesn't show in the other photos, so here's a close shot of the tripod feet. Solid steel, made by the guy who sold me the mount.

 

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#15 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:15 PM

To finish up, I'll include some photos of the scope. There are quite a few in the post I linked to above, but I assume not everyone will go there. That was also mostly about the build.

 

Here's one looking up the tube, showing the two 'handles'. I made them both out of aluminum tube. The thinner one was meant for a guide scope, and the thicker one is an actual handle, but it seconds as a poor man's Telrad, since you can sight through it square, open center to do a rough alignment.

 

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#16 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:20 PM

The scope is powder-coated a somewhat opalescent, metallic orange that I really like, but it come off more red in images than it actually is. This image of the focuser end shows up more yellowy-orange than it actually is!

 

The focuser and the collimatable cell were custom made by Crowmach machining, which was a single person in his shop who made these for a few years back at that time. The course focusing has always been a bit rough, but the fine tuning is silky.

 

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#17 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:26 PM

The scope has been kept in the case I made for it since I finished making it. Unfortunately, it tipped over once when I closed the roof of the observatory, thinking the scope had clearance when it didn't. I almost caught it in time, and did keep it from getting too damaged, but it got this little ding, which can hide under the cradle. The fall did nothing to the lens or the functioning of the scope. Note that the plywood of the cradle is 3/4-inch. It also cracked, and I re-enforced it with some steel plates.

 

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#18 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:28 PM

And, lastly, here's the scope in its open case, which has felt padding anywhere the scope touches.

 

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#19 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:40 PM

Unfortunately for me, using this scope has become difficult for me. I've had four back surgeries in the past eight years or so and, while I can set it up, I have other choices: smaller scopes on lighter mounts, and bigger scopes on permanent piers in our public, roll-off roof observatory, just a six minute drive away. This was the first scope that I put together where looks were taken into account, and it will be a bit sad to part with it, but selling it will be better than leaving it in its case, which is where it's mostly been for the past few years. When I did set it up to look through a few weeks ago, I was reminded of just how nice the views are through it. It has four baffles, and excellent contrast. False color is there on brighter objects, which is to be expected for an f/10 achromat of this diameter, but I'm someone who's never been bothered by it.

 

And, though this mount is not meant for long-exposure astrophotography, it holds the scope solidly and is a push-to: You don't need to loosen clutches in order to move it, as you do on so many newer mounts; just get it balanced, tighten the clutches enough for solidity, and then just push/pull it to where you want it. I really like that, and looked for an old-school mount that works this way. If my back allowed me to sit still at the eyepiece for a long time, I think I'd love to give sketching at the eyepiece a try with this set-up.



#20 deepwoods1

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 07:48 PM

Nice looking scope! Love the perceived color! I hope you can figure out how to live with it!



#21 PaulEK

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 08:11 PM

Unfortunately (for me), I've already decided that it's going up for sale. frown.gif



#22 Bob4BVM

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 10:36 PM

Unfortunately (for me), I've already decided that it's going up for sale. frown.gif

Too bad you have to part with it, you did a beautiful job restoring it !

Can't you leave it permanently mounted and find/build a comfy chair to observe from ? 



#23 PaulEK

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Posted 24 October 2021 - 02:09 PM

Bob4BVM: I might have considered doing that, but I don't have room anywhere to keep it set up, and I already have two permanently mounted scopes, both with larger apertures (a 12-inch SCT and a 14-inch reflector) within easy reach. And, I hope to use what I get for it to fund another project. I actually enjoy working on things more than then using them. It took me a while to learn that, but it's true. But I want someone to use this more than it's getting used now, so out it goes! 


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#24 ccaissie

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Posted 24 October 2021 - 05:12 PM

 Unfortunately, it tipped over once when I closed the roof of the observatory, thinking the scope had clearance when it didn't. I almost caught it in time, and did keep it from getting too damaged, but it got this little ding, which can hide under the cradle. The fall did nothing to the lens or the functioning of the scope.

 

Our club acquired a 6f10 Jaegers, that HAD hit the dirt.  Big lens chip.  I made a mask that handles the chip and masks it down to 5"f/12.

Being a Newtonian guy, i am biased against any chromatism, but this masking makes it work as good as a 5f12 D&G I owned.  

There is much to be said for unobstructed optics.  Nice scope!


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#25 PaulEK

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Posted 25 October 2021 - 11:35 AM

Yikes! I once had my G-11, which I had on casters tip over with a scope on it (not this scope) when it dropped into a little pothole in my driveway. I was amazed with my reaction: without time to think, I just leaped into the way of it smashing into the back end of my minivan. I saved the scope and mount from any impact with anything other than me, but my head and elbow put some nice dents into the minivan. And the minivan put some nice marks on me, too.




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