Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What you have NOT seen...(yet)?

Observing Observing Report Visual
  • Please log in to reply
62 replies to this topic

#1 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 988
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 23 November 2021 - 08:07 AM

Hi Forum,

 

We have read many threads focused on which objects or astronomical events we have seen recently, so I was reflecting on my own experience after ca.15 years observing actively from home and star parties and i realized that despite all these years, i have not witnessed MANY events or objects that are usually commented here in CN or astro-gatherings, and not necessarily obscure DSOs.

 

Admitting my short experience and location restrictions, these are the events / situations that i am still waiting to see:

  • a Total Solar eclipse
  • A glimpse of the southern sky (e.g. Carina nebula, the Jewel Box, 47 Tucanae....)
  • The Magellan Clouds
  • a REAL dark sky (like desert views)
  • A shadow transit of any Jupiter Moon
  • A planetary view with a big scope (> 12 inches)
  • A view through an observatory scope (always daytime visits)
  • the Northern Lights
  • the Eskimo nebula (yes...should be easy...but not to me..)

 Some of these events are now part of my astro bucket list and i hope to realize some of them. 

 

Which are yours?

 

Clear skies!!

Carlos


  • Jon Isaacs, Astrojensen, Javier1978 and 1 other like this

#2 sellsea

sellsea

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 62
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2018
  • Loc: South Bend, Indiana

Posted 23 November 2021 - 09:04 AM

Recently saw Neptune for the first time in my 61 year life, and will search for Uranus soon for the first time.

I saw very few/unspectacular Northern Lights:  even went to Iceland in 2013 and saw nothing.

 

There's a lot for an amateur astronomer to see if you know where to look.



#3 Avgvstvs

Avgvstvs

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 578
  • Joined: 10 Jun 2020
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 23 November 2021 - 09:14 AM

I'm still waiting to see anything circumpolar in the Northern hemisphere.

All my instrument astronomy has been from 30 to 40 degrees south.

Oh and I still haven't seen the M33 yet!


Edited by Avgvstvs, 23 November 2021 - 09:19 AM.

  • George N, ShaulaB, therealdmt and 1 other like this

#4 RalphMeisterTigerMan

RalphMeisterTigerMan

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,999
  • Joined: 01 Nov 2016

Posted 23 November 2021 - 09:20 AM

These are mine, I ashamed to admit:

 

- IC434 The Horsehead nebula

- A real total solar eclipse (only part and anular)

- Mercury or Venus transiting the Sun

- Pluto (I know, not a real planet anymore - reclassified as a dwarf planet)

- A U.F.O. ????? (Honestly, in all my years of observing under dark skies in far away places I have never seen anything that I was not able to explain using Astronomy)

- Santa Claus ??

- The complete Messier catalogue. I know, I should be ashamed of myself!

- A 60mm Refrector capable of 454X

 

Clear skies and keep looking up!

RalphMeisterTigerMan


  • therealdmt and David Mercury like this

#5 MP173

MP173

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,367
  • Joined: 30 Oct 2015

Posted 23 November 2021 - 09:21 AM

My list is quite long but the number one item on my list is M33.  It was viewed once with 7x35s in extreme dark skys in Colorado.

 

Still attempting to view it in Bortle 4.5 skys in my backyard with AT102ED.

 

ed


  • therealdmt likes this

#6 alphatripleplus

alphatripleplus

    World Controller

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 126,647
  • Joined: 09 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 23 November 2021 - 09:28 AM

I have a few items on the list, but number one is experiencing a total solar eclipse. I've come close, but totality is something I would like to see.


  • Corcaroli78 and mrsjeff like this

#7 ziggeman

ziggeman

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 193
  • Joined: 15 Oct 2020

Posted 23 November 2021 - 09:32 AM

A black hole? ;)

I miss a REAL comet! Like halebop. Comet West in the seventies was a real beauty :)


  • therealdmt likes this

#8 zakry3323

zakry3323

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,173
  • Joined: 11 Apr 2016
  • Loc: Fairfield, Westmoreland County, PA

Posted 23 November 2021 - 09:35 AM

I haven't seen anything in the Southern Hemisphere yet. 


  • esd726 likes this

#9 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 988
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 23 November 2021 - 10:10 AM

I have a few items on the list, but number one is experiencing a total solar eclipse. I've come close, but totality is something I would like to see.

The closest i have been to observe one was in Denmark years ago. It was 90% totality, but it was heavily clouded undecided.gif

 

I was in Mexico in 1991, but as a child, i was "not allowed" to observe it. I missed one of the longest eclipses in my lifetime  Totality is my number 1 priority.

 

Carlos



#10 Neptune

Neptune

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,556
  • Joined: 16 Apr 2007
  • Loc: Georgia, USA

Posted 23 November 2021 - 10:23 AM

The Horsehead nebula

Pluto

Cental star in M57


  • therealdmt and David Mercury like this

#11 southernharry

southernharry

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Woodstock, GA

Posted 23 November 2021 - 10:41 AM

2017 End Of Total
Northerm Lights
Comet Bennett

Still have few myself.  Here are some I have been blessed to have observed.


  • Dave Mitsky, therealdmt, sevenofnine and 3 others like this

#12 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 100,624
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 23 November 2021 - 10:47 AM

I’ve been fortunate enough to have observed or have done all the things mentioned so far. 
 

The one astronomical event on my bucket list that I haven’t experienced is a meteor storm.  I was clouded out on every occasion during the Leonids of the late 1990s/early 2000s.  The next Leonid storm may not occur until 2099.


  • Alan D. Whitman likes this

#13 southernharry

southernharry

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Woodstock, GA

Posted 23 November 2021 - 11:20 AM

Came across a couple more I was able to capture.  Been at hobby off and on since the late 50s.

Picture 27
Nov 11 Mercury Transit 2

  • sevenofnine likes this

#14 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 23 November 2021 - 12:58 PM

I'm still waiting to see anything circumpolar in the Northern hemisphere.

All my instrument astronomy has been from 30 to 40 degrees south.

Oh and I still haven't seen the M33 yet!

A few years back - I met a fellow from your country - in the USA to see a total solar eclipse - and came early to attend Stellafane and "see the Northern sky". He had not had a chance yet - and was standing with me and my Obsession 20 as a clear sky started to get dark. I pointed out Polaris with my GLP - his comment "It's not very bright, is it!!"  wink.gif  He was impressed when seeing it cleanly split in my big Dob - not sure he knew Polaris is a nice double star. He was also not very impressed with the Big Dipper!  M-31 in a 20-inch -- different story! wink.gif
~
Now I gotta get to see stuff South of Dec - 40 Degrees.

 

Oh -- also one night at Cherry Springs dark-sky Park in Pennsylvania one October - my fellow observers included a fellow from the UK, and another from Brazil - both amateur astronomers, both taking a brief break from business trips. The UK guy of course knew the Northern sky, and while impressed with the SQM = 21.7+ dark -- he was more impressed with the howling coyote packs in the not far distance!  wink.gif The Brazil guy was seeing Northern objects for the first time. It all got written up by someone in Amateur Astronomy Magazine -- great night it was!


Edited by George N, 23 November 2021 - 01:06 PM.

  • David Mercury likes this

#15 herschelobjects

herschelobjects

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 234
  • Joined: 12 Jan 2013

Posted 23 November 2021 - 01:02 PM

I’ve been fortunate enough to have observed or have done all the things mentioned so far. 
 

The one astronomical event on my bucket list that I haven’t experienced is a meteor storm.  I was clouded out on every occasion during the Leonids of the late 1990s/early 2000s.  The next Leonid storm may not occur until 2099.

Actually, I would think that substantial Leonid storms (at least as active as the ones around 2000) would be visible around 2032-2033 or 2065-2066. For those looking to observe a Venus transit, you can kiss that one goodbye... the next transit is December 10-11, 2117... virtually no one alive today will observe that event. BTW, I hold the world record (along with several tens of thousands of other people) for most Venus transits observed in a lifetime: 2.


  • Joe Bergeron likes this

#16 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 23 November 2021 - 01:19 PM

Actually, I would think that substantial Leonid storms (at least as active as the ones around 2000) would be visible around 2032-2033 or 2065-2066. For those looking to observe a Venus transit, you can kiss that one goodbye... the next transit is December 10-11, 2117... virtually no one alive today will observe that event. BTW, I hold the world record (along with several tens of thousands of other people) for most Venus transits observed in a lifetime: 2.

I was lucky enough to see both Venus transits right from my house - for the first one, my wife, a friend, and I had breakfast at a table on the lawn while observing - after it was over, we all went to work. It was mostly cloudy for the second transit - so I went to play golf. When I got home - a big sucker hole opened up and -- there was the sun! Got my 20x80 binoculars out (filters of course) and there was Venus on the disk - both my wife and I got about 15 minutes of viewing before the cloud hole closed back up.

 

I also saw all of the Leonid storm events - the big one was one of the most impressive things I've seen in the sky - right up there with massive auroral displays. I was at a public observatory with a large group - some guy had his auto windows and doors open with Wagner cranked up really loud -- 4, 5, 6 seen all the time, no matter where you looked - some with bright trains that lasted for minutes. You could still see many when the dawn twilight was so bright only 1st mag stars and planets were still visible! It was reported in the local press that there were lines of people pulled over along the local Interstate Highway - out of their cars, looking at the sky! Two other years the Leonids were fantastic -- but strangely - there was mostly nothing before 1 AM local and then 'boom' meteor every 30 seconds or so - still nothing like the 'storm' event.

 

My hope now is -- great solar eclipse in 2024 -- and another massive aurora!


  • Corcaroli78, herschelobjects and Alan D. Whitman like this

#17 ddegroot

ddegroot

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 155
  • Joined: 12 Jul 2015
  • Loc: Washington, DC

Posted 23 November 2021 - 10:53 PM

At the top of my bucket list: a trip to the southern sky and to a total eclipse. Yet that won't happen any time soon, so I'll limit my list to features I hope to observe in the coming year or two. And since there are so many DSOs, I'll limit it to the Solar System. 

 

 

I've never seen Mercury through a telescope, nor have I been sure that I've seen Neptune. 

I've only seen the most obvious surface details on Mars; I've never seen Olympus Mons, for example. 

I've never seen markings on Venus. 

I've never observed an asteroid. 

As I get deeper into this hobby I acquire more capable telescopes and become a more experienced observer, but as I do of course the objects I hope to see for the first time also become more difficult targets. There's always a frontier - and always a motivation to keep spending money I don't have....


  • George N, Corcaroli78 and therealdmt like this

#18 sevenofnine

sevenofnine

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,784
  • Joined: 16 Apr 2016
  • Loc: Santa Rosa, California

Posted 24 November 2021 - 12:14 AM

I've seen most of the objects mentioned so far that are observable with small amateur equipment. Nothing in the Southern Hemisphere though. One that I'm looking forward to is the whole Veil Nebula. Hopefully, my new AT80ED with a 2" 40mm eyepiece and Olll filter will get it fingerscrossed.gif  

 

M33 eluded me until I took another members advice and used 15x70 binoculars. It's easy but not impressive from a Bortle 4 sky. It looks like a very large cloud of mist. borg.gif


  • therealdmt likes this

#19 Binofrac

Binofrac

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 249
  • Joined: 11 Jul 2019
  • Loc: Kent, UK

Posted 24 November 2021 - 06:31 AM

What have I not seen?

-Most of it.


  • mrsjeff, DAG792 and ziggeman like this

#20 HellsKitchen

HellsKitchen

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,247
  • Joined: 05 Sep 2008
  • Loc: Renmark, Australia

Posted 24 November 2021 - 07:39 AM

Total or annular solar eclipse, Pluto, and an aurora. 

 

Pluto is well within my reach, the other two, not so much. 


  • George N likes this

#21 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,026
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 24 November 2021 - 10:01 AM

For me, most of the galaxies and most of the nebula.  My midwestern B9 skies simply don't allow it.  Dark site trips are rare and are often marred by moon and/or clouds.

 

I did finally get to see orion nebula from a bortle 3 sky.  At home, only the Huygenian region is visible.  My dark sky view was very brief though.  It was in a small opening in the trees and only stayed there a few minutes.

 

I still haven't seen M101 - often too low on the horizon (behind the trees) when I make it to a dark sky.  I did finally see M33.

 

I still haven't seen crab nebula.  So far, swan, eagle, lagoon, snowball, dumbell, and ring.  Nebulosity in pleaides has been elusive.


  • therealdmt likes this

#22 southernharry

southernharry

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Woodstock, GA

Posted 24 November 2021 - 11:22 AM

2021 11 23 2321 0 Jupiter Wave M PS
 
Was able to check one more off my list last night.  Saw moon shadow on Jupiter to long ago to remember.  I did not see it last night but to my surprise it showed up well in two of my captures. I had to used my Questar since trees blocked my Meade 8".  Even then, trees forced me to end before the spot and second shadow were there.
 
Starting to work more deep sky photo work and learn more there.  I have limited sky to view from home observatory so it is a challenge to view.  And with the suburban skies, it is not favorable for visual observation..  Supposed to be B6 skies but look more like B8 or 9 to me.  Clear skies are not a trademark of the Atlanta area.  Steady air is another rare item. 

 


  • George N likes this

#23 Alan D. Whitman

Alan D. Whitman

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 158
  • Joined: 14 Oct 2020

Posted 24 November 2021 - 12:00 PM

Total or annular solar eclipse, Pluto, and an aurora. 

 

Pluto is well within my reach, the other two, not so much. 

How can you say that? Your country of Australia is extremely favoured with total solar eclipses. They will occur on April 20, 2023 and July 22, 2028 and November 25, 2030 and July 13, 2037 and December 26, 2038. And you just had one on November 13, 2012. A total solar eclipse is worth traveling anywhere in the accessible world to see, and your home country is the most favoured country in the entire world in the next 17 years! Believe me, you should plan to see them all. I have seen ten total solar eclipses, but only three were from Canada and the United States; the rest required traveling to distant corners of the world.

 

Incidentally, I have seen an aurora from New South Wales.

 

Alan Whitman

British Columbia, Canada



#24 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 100,624
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 24 November 2021 - 01:14 PM

Actually, I would think that substantial Leonid storms (at least as active as the ones around 2000) would be visible around 2032-2033 or 2065-2066. For those looking to observe a Venus transit, you can kiss that one goodbye... the next transit is December 10-11, 2117... virtually no one alive today will observe that event. BTW, I hold the world record (along with several tens of thousands of other people) for most Venus transits observed in a lifetime: 2.

It's believed that Jupiter has gravitationally perturbed Comet Temple-Tuttle's orbit and/or the Leonid meteor streams.

The Leonids of mid-November (max: November 17-19) are quite unpredictable, with rich displays occuring roughly every 33 years. The last Leonid storm period occurred from 1998 through 2002. Studies have shown that no Leonid storms will occur in either 2033 or 2066. We will have to wait until 2099 for a return of the activity recently seen during the past few years.

https://amsmeteors.o...showers/page/3/

The Leonids are best known for producing meteor storms in the years of 1833, 1866, 1966, 1999, and 2001. These outbursts of meteor activity are best seen when the parent object, comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, is near perihelion (closest approach to the sun). Yet it is not the fresh material we see from the comet, but rather debris from earlier returns that also happen to be most dense at the same time. Unfortunately it appears that the earth will not encounter any dense clouds of debris until 2099

https://www.imo.net/...lendar/#Leonids

Every 33 years or so, we pass through the trail of debris left in the wake of Comet 55P/Temple-Tuttle, and meteors fill the sky like hordes of marauding mayflies. Earth samples a different trail during each storm. For instance, in 1833, our planet slammed directly into a dusty train from 1800. The 1966 storm originated from material boiled off the comet by the sun in 1899. Some of you probably recall the last big storm in 2001 and 2002. I watched that one with my family, and while it didn't rise to the 1833 event, we saw many thrilling fireballs. Unfortunately, Earth won't encounter any more dense clouds until 2099. Hang in there.

https://www.inforum....lite-dumbfounds

 

Perhaps 1999 will furnish a more memorable show. If so, it will be the last good opportunity in a century, because the placement of the stream will not be favourable again until 2098, and after that 2131 and 2164 are not as promising. “Those are the Leonids’ last gasp,” Littmann writes, for the orientation of the orbit will slowly drift away from the Earth. There were no great Leonid storms before the ninth century, and there will be no more beyond 2164.

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/16183


  • herschelobjects likes this

#25 Alan D. Whitman

Alan D. Whitman

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 158
  • Joined: 14 Oct 2020

Posted 24 November 2021 - 01:27 PM

Hi Forum,

 

We have read many threads focused on which objects or astronomical events we have seen recently, so I was reflecting on my own experience after ca.15 years observing actively from home and star parties and i realized that despite all these years, i have not witnessed MANY events or objects that are usually commented here in CN or astro-gatherings, and not necessarily obscure DSOs.

 

Admitting my short experience and location restrictions, these are the events / situations that i am still waiting to see:

  •  
  • A glimpse of the southern sky (e.g. Carina nebula, the Jewel Box, 47 Tucanae....
  • A shadow transit of any Jupiter Moon

When Jupiter is well-placed you can see a shadow transit on Jupiter every few nights, and a mere 60 mm refractor suffices if the seeing is excellent. I realize that Jupiter is too far south for a steady view from Denmark this year. Occasionally you can see two shadows in transit simultaneously; very, very rarely you can see three at once (three total solar eclipses occurring simultaneously on Jupiter!).

 

The Jewel Box is the most over-hyped deep-sky object in the entire sky, just because it has a great name. There are eight far-southern open clusters that are superior to the Jewel Box, in my opinion. If you observe with a large telescope, as John Herschel was when he made the description that gave the cluster its name, then the Jewel Box is, well, a pretty nice cluster. But if you take a small travel scope to the southern hemisphere, you will be disappointed by the Jewel Box. I would rate the top open clusters in the far southern sky as NGC 3532 in Carina (beats out M11 and the Pleiades for finest open cluster in the sky, in my opinion), NGC 2477 in Puppis, NGC 2516 in Carina, NGC 3293 in Carina, NGC 3766 in Centaurus, NGC 6025 in TrA, NGC 6231 in southern Scorpius, and IC 4651 in Ara. The five underlined clusters are true splendours; the Jewel Box (NGC 4755) is not in their league, but it is attractive with a big scope.

 

Alan Whitman

British Columbia, Canada
(seven southern observing runs)


  • DAG792 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Observing, Observing Report, Visual



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics