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What you have NOT seen...(yet)?

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#51 nof

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 11:17 PM

I was fortunate to see both of those very impressive meteor showers from the porch of the observatory in Mitzpeh Ramon. There were just a few of us on that porch - and my mother was there, too. The two of us were jumping up and down with excitement- there were thousands of meteor streaks and many bright fireballs. I was making composite wide field photographs. Next to me was a US Air Force general who had come to israel for the occasion. He had a couple assistants and lots of devices. I asked him what he was doing and he said, “son, I’m from the fiftieth Space Wing and we’ve got 20 billion dollars worth of hardware up there and we want to know what’s going on!” He wasn’t jumping up and down and shouting at fireballs. What a spectacle!

I’ve been fortunate enough to have observed or have done all the things mentioned so far.

The one astronomical event on my bucket list that I haven’t experienced is a meteor storm. I was clouded out on every occasion during the Leonids of the late 1990s/early 2000s. The next Leonid storm may not occur until 2099.


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#52 Look at the sky 101

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 11:23 PM

waytogo.gif

 

Of the things I would like to see, the one I've not seen is the Sirius pup. I've come to the conclusion, there's too much scattered light from the cataract in my observing eye to see it.

 

If I ever get cataract surgery, there's hope...

 

Jon 

I had the operation, more fear than harm.

It makes all the difference in the world.

It's like having children's eyes for a second time.


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#53 nof

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 11:34 PM

I traveled to the Faroe Islands for a total solar eclipse but it was cloudy. Though I had a great time hiking there in the mist and rain. What a beautiful North Atlantic coast!
Still hope to see a solar eclipse from beginning to end, though I’ve seen part of one.
Pluto: never bothered to even look until one night in the desert with my wife she asked, can we see Pluto? It was fairly isolated near a distinctive arrangement of stars according to sky safari. We looked and there it was!
The Southern skies would be nice. Maybe in the next couple years…
Dark clear skies are always desirable!

Edited by nof, 25 November 2021 - 11:35 PM.


#54 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 01:02 AM

Thanks for this Dave! I’m heading out next week to dark skies. I’m going to hunt some of these down among my other targets.

Here are some finder charts for 3C 273.  Unfortunately, some of the other ones that were online are no longer available.

 

https://astronomynow...the-spring-sky/
 

https://astronomynow...field_chart.pdf
 

https://www.cs.cmu.e...uasar3c273.html
 

https://www.lsw.uni-...3c273_small.png



#55 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 01:04 AM

There's another list of "bright" quasars posted at http://spider.seds.o...r/Misc/qso.html



#56 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 01:44 AM

I had the operation, more fear than harm.

It makes all the difference in the world.

It's like having children's eyes for a second time.

 

My eyes work reasonably well so I am not in a hurry..  The success rate for cataract surgery is quite high but it's not without it's difficulties and failures and even a "successful" operating can have issues. 

 

Seeing the Pup is not a big deal. 

 

I will have the surgery when my doc recommends it and not before.

 

Jon


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#57 vdog

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 02:05 AM


  • a Total Solar eclipse
  • A glimpse of the southern sky (e.g. Carina nebula, the Jewel Box, 47 Tucanae....)
  • The Magellan Clouds
  • a REAL dark sky (like desert views)
  • A shadow transit of any Jupiter Moon
  • A planetary view with a big scope (> 12 inches)
  • A view through an observatory scope (always daytime visits)
  • the Northern Lights
  • the Eskimo nebula (yes...should be easy...but not to me..)

I've seen the three I bolded, but the others on your list are things I'd also like to see but have not yet.   I've also not seen the Horsehead but I intend to give it a serious shot as soon as this weekend, conditions permitting.  


Edited by vdog, 26 November 2021 - 02:05 AM.

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#58 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 12:43 PM

My eyes work reasonably well so I am not in a hurry..  The success rate for cataract surgery is quite high but it's not without it's difficulties and failures and even a "successful" operating can have issues. 

 

Seeing the Pup is not a big deal. 

 

I will have the surgery when my doc recommends it and not before.

 

Jon

I've seen the Pup on a number of occasions.  I'm also contemplating cataract surgery at some point.



#59 Steve OK

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 12:51 PM

I have not seen the central star in M 57, the Ring Nebula.  I gave it a good try a few years ago at a great dark site with my 17.5" Dob, but the seeing wasn't all that great.  Several factors need to align to see the tiny speck of light, seeing being one of them.  I missed the great Leonid shower 20 years ago by believing the weather maps, and drove to a spot that probably was cloud-free, but was inundated with thick ground fog.  Had I stayed home where clouds were predicted but had clear skies, I would have seen it.  Weather predictions are wrong, sometimes!

 

Steve 


Edited by Steve OK, 26 November 2021 - 12:52 PM.


#60 grif 678

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 02:03 PM

I have always wanted to see the Horse Head nebula



#61 fallenstarseven

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 05:03 PM

-Mercury or Pluto.  Not sure when I will ever have that opportunity.

-M1.  I have yet to be able to make this out in my 10" Dob.

-Total Solar Eclipse, but I plan to remedy that in 2024.

-An asteroid, but I hope to remedy that soon as well.

-About 25 or so of the Messier that I am still working on.

 

-Anything in the Southern Hemisphere skies, at least with a telescope.  I've only been south of the equator once, just after high school graduation, on a family trip to my mother's birth country, Australia; I did manage to see the Southern Cross and the Magellanics with my naked eyes.

 

I have been lucky enough to observe a Venus Transit, several Galilean transits of Jupiter, several different comets including Halley; and about 3/4 of the Messier catalog.


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#62 birger

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Posted 27 November 2021 - 03:29 AM

A lot of things:

-Total solar eclipse

-Central parts of the Milky Way (Sagittarius/Scorpius region, practically impossible to see from Sweden)

-Magellanic clouds

-Transit of Mercury

-Gegenschein

-A zero-light pollution sky

-Planetary transit (the next will happen in 2065)

-Planetary occultation of a star (the next will happen in 2035)

 

 

 

However, I have seen:

-Zodiacal light

-Aurora borealis

-Several total lunar eclipses

-Transit of Venus

-Magnitude 6.5 stars with the naked eye

-Light pillars, solar halos and other atmospheric phaenomena

-Lunar occultation of stars (Aldebaran)

-The weakest parts of the Milky Way (Auriga-Orion section)


Edited by birger, 27 November 2021 - 03:31 AM.

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#63 ziggeman

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Posted 27 November 2021 - 10:51 AM

In 1994 I watched Jupiter and the effects of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 inpact. I used my fine 4.5 inch parabolic newton and 225x . Black ' holes' in the jovian clouds were easily visible.

Can we have another? Pleaaase ? :)


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#64 Starman1

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 04:36 PM

Hi Forum,

 

We have read many threads focused on which objects or astronomical events we have seen recently, so I was reflecting on my own experience after ca.15 years observing actively from home and star parties and i realized that despite all these years, i have not witnessed MANY events or objects that are usually commented here in CN or astro-gatherings, and not necessarily obscure DSOs.

 

Admitting my short experience and location restrictions, these are the events / situations that i am still waiting to see:

  • a Total Solar eclipse
  • A glimpse of the southern sky (e.g. Carina nebula, the Jewel Box, 47 Tucanae....)
  • The Magellan Clouds
  • a REAL dark sky (like desert views)
  • A shadow transit of any Jupiter Moon
  • A planetary view with a big scope (> 12 inches)
  • A view through an observatory scope (always daytime visits)
  • the Northern Lights
  • the Eskimo nebula (yes...should be easy...but not to me..)

 Some of these events are now part of my astro bucket list and i hope to realize some of them. 

 

Which are yours?

 

Clear skies!!

Carlos

I've seen all of those except a total solar eclipse--I had the flu during the 2017 one (looking forward to 2024).

What I haven't seen is roughly 18000 galaxies visible to my scope's aperture (I've seen roughly 5-6000 so far).

I won't live long enough to see that limit, and I'm moving up in size, expanding the number visible, so unless I live to 150 and observe at every New Moon,

I'll be lucky to add a few thousand to what I've seen.  Hopefully, some of those will be very interesting to observe--you never know until you see them.



#65 25585

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 05:15 PM

Sombrero galaxy

M87 giant E0 elliptical galaxy

Fomalhaut

Proxima Cent.

Omega Centauri

47 Tucanae

M101

Neptune

Uranus

any non-Galilean moon of Jupiter

any Moon of Saturn

any aurora

Barnard's Star

not enough globular clusters.

 

Would a GOTO mount be good?


Edited by 25585, 28 November 2021 - 05:16 PM.


#66 Starman1

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 06:11 PM

Any of your mounts an EQ mount?

M104: Use widest field eyepiece.  Center on Porrima (Gamma) in Virgo.  Go 10° due south.

         Use widest field eyepiece.  Center on Spica (α) in Virgo.  Go 50' (5/6 of an hour in RA) due west.

Fomalhaut: Brightest star in Piscs Austrinus, right below Aquarius and East of Capricornus.

M87:  Find Vindemiatrix (ε) in Virgo.  Go 1.5° due north and lock Dec axis.  Go West a little over 30' (1/2 hour in RA) and it will be in the field.  Nearby to the NW are the M84/86 pairing.

M101: Center on Mizar (Zeta) in UMA.  Move scope S until Mizar in north end of field.  Lock Dec axis.  Move scope east 40' (about 2/3 of an hour)

 

Proxima Centauri, Omega Centauri, 47 Tucanae, you will need to be south of the equator to get a good view.

 

non galilean Moon of Jupiter:   needs very large scope (25"+) and superb seeing and perhaps occulting bar.

Moons of Saturn.  Just needs good seeing.  A few are visible in a 4" refractor under good conditions.  Titan is visible in binoculars.  You've probably seen Titan many times.

Barnards star:  finder chart:

       https://astronomynow...le-from-the-uk/

Neptune:

      https://www.nakedeye...com/neptune.htm

Uranus:

     https://www.nakedeye....com/uranus.htm


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#67 25585

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 06:29 PM

Any of your mounts an EQ mount?

M104: Use widest field eyepiece.  Center on Porrima (Gamma) in Virgo.  Go 10° due south.

         Use widest field eyepiece.  Center on Spica (α) in Virgo.  Go 50' (5/6 of an hour in RA) due west.

Fomalhaut: Brightest star in Piscs Austrinus, right below Aquarius and East of Capricornus.

M87:  Find Vindemiatrix (ε) in Virgo.  Go 1.5° due north and lock Dec axis.  Go West a little over 30' (1/2 hour in RA) and it will be in the field.  Nearby to the NW are the M84/86 pairing.

M101: Center on Mizar (Zeta) in UMA.  Move scope S until Mizar in north end of field.  Lock Dec axis.  Move scope east 40' (about 2/3 of an hour)

 

Proxima Centauri, Omega Centauri, 47 Tucanae, you will need to be south of the equator to get a good view.

 

non galilean Moon of Jupiter:   needs very large scope (25"+) and superb seeing and perhaps occulting bar.

Moons of Saturn.  Just needs good seeing.  A few are visible in a 4" refractor under good conditions.  Titan is visible in binoculars.  You've probably seen Titan many times.

Barnards star:  finder chart:

       https://astronomynow...le-from-the-uk/

Neptune:

      https://www.nakedeye...com/neptune.htm

Uranus:

     https://www.nakedeye....com/uranus.htm

Thank you Don, I will try that. waytogo.gif  No EQ, but DSC next year hopefully. 



#68 mirpis

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 08:07 PM

Mercury in a telescope, or Neptune or Pluto at all.

Any galaxies other than M31 and its companion.

Any nebulae other than M42, M27, and M57.

 

I haven't been back in the hobby long. When I was a kid, I just couldn't find anything that wasn't naked-eye visible. I have a push-to dobsonian now, but I'm hampered by light pollution and lack of time.



#69 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 08:28 PM

An asteroid, but I hope to remedy that soon as well.

The dwarf planet/asteroid 1 Ceres was at opposition on Friday.  While it's the biggest but not the brightest asteroid, it can be seen easily using binoculars from a reasonably dark location.  Ceres is currently just west of the Hyades.
 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Ceres 11-28-21 Heavens Above.JPG

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#70 mirpis

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 08:31 PM

The dwarf planet/asteroid 1 Ceres was at opposition on Friday.  While it's the biggest but not the brightest asteroid, it can be seen easily using binoculars from a reasonably dark location.  It's currently just west of the Hyades.

 

https://www.heavens-...&alt=133&tz=EST

How large a scope would one need to resolve its disk?


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#71 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 08:56 PM

Ceres is currently approximately 0.74 arc seconds in angular diameter and might be capable of being resolved with a 10" aperture operating at very high magnification.  I've tried several times this year using a 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at magnifications as high as 648x but the seeing was never good enough for me to say that I could definitely discern Ceres as a disk.


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#72 Alan D. Whitman

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 09:37 PM


 

non galilean Moon of Jupiter:   needs very large scope (25"+) and superb seeing and perhaps occulting bar.

My 16-inch found Jupiter's magnitude 14.2 (visual magnitude at mean opposition distance) moon Himalia in 1999. It was far enough from Jupiter due to its 250.6 day orbit that it was just beyond the planet's glow so no occulting bar was needed. I had to work from a plotted orbit in Sky&Telescope magazine and plot the field to check for motion on the next night. My first suspect didn't move, but the next one did move appropriately. This was a tough observation at the time, 22 years ago, but nowadays my Guide planetarium program would plot it precisely and show most stars to a little fainter than Himalia, along with any similar magnitude asteroids. But you would still have to check for motion on another night to confirm your candidate.

 

Alan Whitman
 


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#73 weis14

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 11:51 PM

The list of things I haven't seen is really long and includes some objects that I really need to check off (the rest of the Messiers for example).  However, the list of things that I haven't seen and really want to see is much shorter.

  • Total solar eclipse (missed the 2017 one due to the birth of my son - saw a nice partial eclipse from the hospital parking lot)
  • Southern skies
  • The Pup.  This one is going to be checked off this winter hopefully.  The neighbor to the south cut down his trees and my CFF160 is begging to be let loose on this target. 
  • An impact on Jupiter (I was too young for Shoemaker-Levy 9)

 

For me, it's more (or all) about what I have seen and what I can see.

 

In this hobby one can miss out on a lot of sights and still see enough in the way of other sights to make one feel like the luckiest observer on the planet.

 

It's likely easier to be a happy, content, satisfied observer when one concentrates more on what one can see, and less on those things one has not seen.

 

I've really given very little thought to all that I've not seen.  There's been more than enough that I have seen to balance my apple cart into a more positive attitude.  I'm OK with missing out on things.

 

This is a really great way to put it.  I've commented on other threads about my disappointing journeys into aperture fever and how it has really led me back to two very high quality, but relatively small scopes.  Your mantra is exactly why I can be happy with my biggest scope being slightly over 6" in aperture.  



#74 ziggeman

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Posted Yesterday, 01:43 AM

How large a scope would one need to resolve its disk?

Damian Peach managed to 'resolve' Vesta and Ceres is larger so its probably a 14incher or something like that.

https://skyandtelesc...018-opposition/

 

or bigger :)

 

https://www.cloudyni...resolved-in-20/


Edited by ziggeman, Yesterday, 01:51 AM.


#75 Keith Rivich

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Posted Yesterday, 05:20 PM

How large a scope would one need to resolve its disk?

I can see it (Ceres) as a disk in my 25". Very small but obviously non-stellar. Very good seeing and very high magnification required. 


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