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Just what’s needed to get started in serious solar imaging?

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#26 chemman

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 02:11 PM

Thanks Bob.  I figured since the $1.5K upper limit that any "serious" imaging would need to be in the form of a Lucky Quark.  But if that number was not solid, after all I really only intended to spend 1.5K too, I would run with the nice scope he has and provide some serious solar imaging alternatives that are guaranteed to work.    Heck I would not be surprised if Lunt inc. would take your scope in their shop and adapt it for you.     

 

Serious Solar imaging by definition requires a large investment of disposable income and time and effort.  

 

JMHO

 

Chuck

 

ps. this is a good thread for anyone that wants to know "what’s needed to do get started in serious solar imaging".


Edited by chemman, 25 November 2021 - 02:13 PM.

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#27 MalVeauX

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 02:42 PM

 

 

Serious Solar imaging by definition requires a large investment of disposable income and time and effort. 

Not really. Time and effort yes. But it doesn't have to be some huge financial gate keeper.

 

Serious solar imaging is much more about the academics of what you're actually doing, how you're doing it and presenting it (whether its observation or imaging). You can be a serious solar observer or imager with a 50mm or 60mm and see everything and not spend a ton. Really competent and accurate images can and are done with small scopes. Serious imaging doesn't have to uniquely be large aperture, attempts at high resolution, etc.

 

The original message from the OP was actually serious and high resolution, and that's a humdinger because no matter how much money you have to spend, it won't matter if your seeing is 3 arc-seconds, so this is why I stress over and over seeing conditions.

 

I think its far more critical to know as much of the academics about our star, about the filter systems, about wavefront physics, about sampling and resolution as an approach to serious imaging with respect to solar (or any astronomy imaging), far more than anything. And baring that, if it's just imaging and nothing more, just pretty pictures, that's fine by me, but serious high res or serious pretty images start and end with seeing conditions relative to the image scale. Everything else comes second. But certainly someone serious about all of this would not be too happy with a low quality filter, even if enjoying splendid high quality views of a full disc from a humble but excellent 60mm. And you can get into this, seriously, for little money really. I would say $2k is a good ballpark to get your hands on an excellent high quality solar scope with much less gamble (such as a Lunt 60) and that it's perfectly capable for a competent and serious solar imager and observer alike. Unfortunately very little is available for less, that isn't used or compromised in a major way. And spending more does not guarantee much of anything on many options.

 

Anyhow, not trying to soap box, just didn't want anyone to get an impression that they cannot be serious without a high buy in. I think its more important that someone who wants to approach this seriously know more about the subject, and less about the purchase choices up front.

 

Very best,
 


Edited by MalVeauX, 25 November 2021 - 02:48 PM.

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#28 ProfLemoi

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 03:03 PM

Lots of input on the Daystar Quark, but I can tell you I just got a new Chromosphere from Daystar and I have to say I was VERY pleased with the results; recently getting into Solar, the Quark-C was the most affordable for me and the results have been very satisfying.  One thing you can do (as I did) was to get on to Astrobin and type in SOLAR.  Look at all the pics people are getting but most importantly take a look at the equipment they used to get it.  This is how I came to buy a $300 Celestron XLT 120 (used of course) with 1000mm focal length, a Daystar Quark Chromosphere (then later I added the Prominence model) a Baader UV/IR 2" Filter, and a nice little AT60 for grander views of the disk.   I am still early in my solar fun but I am pleased with what I have and so is my wallet!  :). So I can recommend the Quark.... especially for starting out.

 

My 2 1/2 cents ;)

 

Kevin


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#29 xonefs

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 10:17 PM

Lots of input on the Daystar Quark, but I can tell you I just got a new Chromosphere from Daystar and I have to say I was VERY pleased with the results; recently getting into Solar, the Quark-C was the most affordable for me and the results have been very satisfying. One thing you can do (as I did) was to get on to Astrobin and type in SOLAR. Look at all the pics people are getting but most importantly take a look at the equipment they used to get it. This is how I came to buy a $300 Celestron XLT 120 (used of course) with 1000mm focal length, a Daystar Quark Chromosphere (then later I added the Prominence model) a Baader UV/IR 2" Filter, and a nice little AT60 for grander views of the disk. I am still early in my solar fun but I am pleased with what I have and so is my wallet! :). So I can recommend the Quark.... especially for starting out.

My 2 1/2 cents ;)

Kevin


Thanks.

There’s some good knowledge and info in here which I’m thankful for, and some not so useful gatekeeping from people… it’s hard to tell where the line is of what kind of investment is actually needed to get the kind of results starting out I’m looking for. If I believed everything I read on cloudynights getting into deep sky imaging I would have believed I was wasting my time imaging if I didn’t start with a $12,000 mount. But I know better now and that a lot of people here with six figures worth of gear are still making worse images than people on entry level stuff… so I’m trying to get an idea of how that applies to solar. I guess I’ll check astrobin.
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#30 ProfLemoi

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 11:26 PM

Thanks.

There’s some good knowledge and info in here which I’m thankful for, and some not so useful gatekeeping from people… it’s hard to tell where the line is of what kind of investment is actually needed to get the kind of results starting out I’m looking for. If I believed everything I read on cloudynights getting into deep sky imaging I would have believed I was wasting my time imaging if I didn’t start with a $12,000 mount. But I know better now and that a lot of people here with six figures worth of gear are still making worse images than people on entry level stuff… so I’m trying to get an idea of how that applies to solar. I guess I’ll check astrobin.

I have found Astrobin very helpful.  Seeing what people are able to accomplish with their specific gear is a great help to me... of course there are many other variables as well, seeing conditions, luck, setting things up correctly, etc... but yes, I completely understand about the 12,000 mount idea... its rubbish.  My experience has taught me to start with as few variables as possible, i.e. start with basic imaging, see the results you get, try again and look to improve your technique.  To me, the best part of this hobby is the JOURNEY ... not just the destination.  Nothing is a substitute for personal experience... that being said, I have gained a lot from talking with people here on CN... it's a great group of people with a common interest... I have said before, enjoy the journey, do your home work, try and try again and so long as you are having fun, who could ask for much more?

 

One key mistake that I think people make is dropping to much money in this hobby right away... sophisticated equipment requires sophisticated knowledge and skills and when that does not happen people get frustrated and quit.  Therefore I started small and over time added things... I am still learning and I ask lots of questions here... CN is a great resource for options and results based on facts.  There is of course a basic formula that I have found to be true... your mount is important, VERY important, and learning how to set it up, is key.  Your mount should have the ability to do what you need, and that is a very important point.  Don't go crazy, but do your homework and take your time working things out.  The rest will fall into place smile.gif

 


Edited by ProfLemoi, 25 November 2021 - 11:30 PM.


#31 C0rs4ir_

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Posted 26 November 2021 - 02:14 AM

Thanks.

There’s some good knowledge and info in here which I’m thankful for, and some not so useful gatekeeping from people… it’s hard to tell where the line is of what kind of investment is actually needed to get the kind of results starting out I’m looking for. If I believed everything I read on cloudynights getting into deep sky imaging I would have believed I was wasting my time imaging if I didn’t start with a $12,000 mount. But I know better now and that a lot of people here with six figures worth of gear are still making worse images than people on entry level stuff… so I’m trying to get an idea of how that applies to solar. I guess I’ll check astrobin.

i think you have been provided with a lot of good info from different people. different views allow you to pick the essence that you need from it to make up your own mind. no need to believe each and every word. i dont see any gatekeeping, the results you want to achieve require certain equipment. and the equipment in this topic is not as straight forward as in deep sky photography.

 

and checking on astrobin or google for pictures is a good way to see what has been used for what kind of result.


Edited by C0rs4ir_, 26 November 2021 - 02:30 AM.

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