Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Moon in color 2021-11-25

  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 25 November 2021 - 09:10 PM

My first photographic attempts with the SCT telescope (Meade LX200 ACF 8``). For a long-time enthusiast and user of refractors, switching to SCT is not easy. The need for collimation, cooling and temperature equalization, and even the size and weight of the telescope all seem daunting at first.

 

However, I must say that although I have not yet managed to fully collimate this telescope as recommended by more experienced colleagues from the forum, I am beginning to convince myself of the SCT. The quality of the details already seems promising to me. I have to accept the fact that I cannot afford a refractor that combines the comfort of use with the quality of details shown in this photo. So I will have to make friends with the Allen key :-)

 

 

TYCHO-2021-11-25-2.jpg


  • EricCCD, Achernar, camman and 24 others like this

#2 GDAstrola

GDAstrola

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 174
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2018
  • Loc: St. Louis

Posted 25 November 2021 - 11:17 PM

Thank you for sharing that striking photograph of the moon.


  • LukaszLu likes this

#3 John_Moore

John_Moore

    Author: Craters of the Nearside Moon

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 860
  • Joined: 24 Jul 2009

Posted 26 November 2021 - 01:23 AM

As expected, Lukas, (what with your SCT experiments and all), this is a superb view.

 

Crater Tycho, as usual, is prominent, but I think the left-most, shadow-viewed sector (essentially, the southward's moon etc.,) is what catch's the eye.

 

John


Edited by John_Moore, 26 November 2021 - 01:56 AM.

  • BillHarris and LukaszLu like this

#4 RMay

RMay

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 627
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2019
  • Loc: NorCal

Posted 26 November 2021 - 02:46 AM

That’s a beauty… thanks for sharing.

Ron
  • LukaszLu likes this

#5 cmas

cmas

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 96
  • Joined: 27 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Finland

Posted 26 November 2021 - 03:19 AM

Excellent stuff!
  • LukaszLu likes this

#6 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 26 November 2021 - 06:44 AM

Thanks a lot for the motivating comments! I look forward to the improvement of the weather, to refine the collimation and try the session with the Barlow lens ...



#7 Achernar

Achernar

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,359
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Mobile, Alabama, USA

Posted 26 November 2021 - 01:28 PM

This is a truly excellent photo. I think you obtained your data mere hours ahead of the data I got that very same morning from the lighting of the scene. I too use an 8-inch SCT for my work, but it's a Celestron EdgeHD instead of a Meade. You clearly had good seeing that morning. That matters a great deal for getting sharp imagery, and so does collimation. The processing is very good too. Well done!

 

Taras


  • LukaszLu and Sarciness like this

#8 Borodog

Borodog

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,251
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020

Posted 26 November 2021 - 02:09 PM

I feel like I already said this, but I don't see me comment here. In any event, that's a beautiful image.


  • LukaszLu likes this

#9 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 26 November 2021 - 08:59 PM

Thank you very much! I took the photo near Krakow / Poland around 1 am, in Alabama it was 6 pm then, maybe you checked back longer than the 7-hour difference between our locations, because I was taking the photo when the Moon was still relatively low above the horizon.

 

One more photo from this evening:

 

ARCHIMEDES-2021-11-25-1b.jpg


  • Paul Hyndman, Achernar, airscottdenning and 4 others like this

#10 Achernar

Achernar

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,359
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Mobile, Alabama, USA

Posted 26 November 2021 - 11:00 PM

You're welcome! The photo I posted today was stacked from video data I acquired around 5:30 a.m. local time, which would be around 12:30 p.m. in your area. In your second photo, I found Mt. Hadley, Rima Hadley and the Apollo 15 landing site. Like the first, it's excellent. If there is one thing you'll want to do is be on the lookout for excess noise, there is a little in the photo but it's not bad. This is why I am cautious with the gain setting and why I record enough video data to ensure I have at least 1,000 frames and preferably much more to work with while stacking images. Over sharpening also will reveal noise in an image that otherwise would be hidden.
 

 

Taras


Edited by Achernar, 26 November 2021 - 11:05 PM.

  • LukaszLu likes this

#11 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 27 November 2021 - 08:51 AM

Thanks Taras, I admire photos you take, although I'm not always sure which telescope you used. The ones with the 8 '' Celestron show much higher precision of details than what I have managed to achieve so far. However, I hope that this is not the end of my 8's capabilities - and that I will be able to reach a little further with the Barlow lens. So far I have not had the opportunity to do such a test - for over a month (i.e. since I bought this 8 '') the weather here has been terrible.

 

I know the grain is a critical threshold for sharpening. The graininess is partly due to my laptop's capabilities, limiting the transfer rate and the number of frames I can collect. A small number of frames translates into an increase in graininess.

 

Added to this is my laziness that I never set the mount and guidance too precisely, which results in the image shifting during the session. As a result, some parts of the image are ignored during stacking and are out of focus in the final photo. To deal with this, I stack these fragments separately, which restores their sharpness but increases their graininess due to the reduced number of frames used for such local rescue treatments.

 

I also admit that I have a fairly high grain tolerance for two reasons:

 

First of all, I still remember the times of analog photography. Films with high sensitivity (ISO 400 or more) then had large, clear grain. I am used to treating it as a kind of "technological footprint" - such as a paper texture or a printing raster.

 

Secondly, I have noticed that many colleagues are tempted to abuse the noise reduction filter, which leads to false images showing a perfectly smooth mare surface with very sharp, rare craters. When we play with zooming in on maps and photos taken, for example, by LROC, we see that such situations never happen - the surface is evenly covered with craters, regardless of the zoom level. It seems to me that the presence of grain at the resolution limit of the smallest objects helps to avoid such false image. Instead of pretending that "there's nothing else there" we see that the small details are simply lost in the grain structure and we can not be sure "what's next". In my opinion, this is a much closer to the "truth". :-)


Edited by LukaszLu, 27 November 2021 - 08:52 AM.


#12 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 28 November 2021 - 10:03 AM

The last picture from this session. Cassini Bright Spot & Hell Q crater:

 

CASSINI-BRIGHT-SPOT-2021-11-25-2b.jpg


Edited by LukaszLu, 28 November 2021 - 10:04 AM.

  • Achernar, Kenny V., cmas and 2 others like this

#13 tdfwds

tdfwds

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 200
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2021

Posted 28 November 2021 - 11:36 AM

The last picture from this session. Cassini Bright Spot & Hell Q crater:

 

CASSINI-BRIGHT-SPOT-2021-11-25-2b.jpg

I must admit, especially with the font you've used, this has the look of a front book cover about it! ; )  In other words, looks good enough to be on the front of a book!


  • LukaszLu likes this

#14 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 28 November 2021 - 12:51 PM

Thanks - the typeface is taken from roman Trajan Column - in my opinion, it fits very well with the overwhelmingly monumental brutality of the lunar surface :-)



#15 frank5817

frank5817

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 17,472
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Mesa, Arizona

Posted 28 November 2021 - 01:04 PM

Excellent images -all.

 

Frank


  • LukaszLu likes this

#16 Paul Hyndman

Paul Hyndman

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,394
  • Joined: 13 Jul 2004
  • Loc: CT Shoreline

Posted 28 November 2021 - 08:13 PM

Thank you very much! I took the photo near Krakow / Poland around 1 am, in Alabama it was 6 pm then, maybe you checked back longer than the 7-hour difference between our locations, because I was taking the photo when the Moon was still relatively low above the horizon.

 

One more photo from this evening:

 

I'm impressed that you've captured several Plato craterlets and part of the Alpine Valley central rille. Nice work!
 


  • LukaszLu likes this

#17 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 November 2021 - 09:16 AM

Thank you Paul, the small craters in Plato are not a special feat - I have easily photographed them with the 120mm apo. But the rille at Vallis Alpes remains one of the sources of my complexes because I have been unable to photograph it for a long time. Can you really see anything there? It would be a breakthrough for me :-)


  • Paul Hyndman likes this

#18 Paul Hyndman

Paul Hyndman

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,394
  • Joined: 13 Jul 2004
  • Loc: CT Shoreline

Posted 29 November 2021 - 11:18 AM

Thank you Paul, the small craters in Plato are not a special feat - I have easily photographed them with the 120mm apo. But the rille at Vallis Alpes remains one of the sources of my complexes because I have been unable to photograph it for a long time. Can you really see anything there? It would be a breakthrough for me :-)

Faint vestiges, but yes I do see parts of the rille. Perhaps it can be described as one of those features, once seen, is easier to see again (or with averted imagination grin.gif). I have seen it with my 10" AP MCT and larger AP refractors or via stacked images. It and the number of resolvable Plato craterlets are always interesting (challenging) targets.

 

Nice job!



#19 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 30 November 2021 - 09:37 AM

This is a very capricious object that can sometimes be very surprising. For a long time I was unable to photograph even a trace of this rille using the 120 mm ED refractor.

 

As I collect old classic refractors, I sometimes make photo tests with them to see how far I can go with smaller apertures. One day in July I did a session with an old 1962 Royal Astro R-74 achro. And suddenly I was surprised to discover that in the Vallis Alpes photo you can see a clear trace of an elongated structure at the bottom of the valley. Meanwhile, the telescope was an ordinary achromat with a diameter of only 76 mm!

 

To this day, I do not know if it is actually a trace of rille, or maybe some artifact that is a trace of the outer edges of the Vallis Alpes for instance... RAO R-74 is an amazing, unique refractor, which often left behind much larger, modern apos during visual observations. But in the case of photos, the small diameter and the associated limitation of resolution manifest themselves mercilessly, limiting the visibility of small details. Is it possible to capture this rille with a 76mm ?? Here is the photo made with RAO:

Attached Thumbnails

  • WALKING-ON-THE-MOON-2021-07-30-1.jpg
  • vallis-alpes.jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 30 November 2021 - 09:51 AM.

  • Max Astronomy likes this

#20 Max Astronomy

Max Astronomy

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 158
  • Joined: 01 Oct 2021
  • Loc: Russia, Primorsky Krai, Ussuriysk

Posted 30 November 2021 - 08:38 PM

This is a very capricious object that can sometimes be very surprising. For a long time I was unable to photograph even a trace of this rille using the 120 mm ED refractor.

 

As I collect old classic refractors, I sometimes make photo tests with them to see how far I can go with smaller apertures. One day in July I did a session with an old 1962 Royal Astro R-74 achro. And suddenly I was surprised to discover that in the Vallis Alpes photo you can see a clear trace of an elongated structure at the bottom of the valley. Meanwhile, the telescope was an ordinary achromat with a diameter of only 76 mm!

 

To this day, I do not know if it is actually a trace of rille, or maybe some artifact that is a trace of the outer edges of the Vallis Alpes for instance... RAO R-74 is an amazing, unique refractor, which often left behind much larger, modern apos during visual observations. But in the case of photos, the small diameter and the associated limitation of resolution manifest themselves mercilessly, limiting the visibility of small details. Is it possible to capture this rille with a 76mm ?? Here is the photo made with RAO:

So good for achromatic refractor! Without chromatism.



#21 Lambda86

Lambda86

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 30 Nov 2021
  • Loc: Monterey Bay

Posted 01 December 2021 - 08:24 PM

My first photographic attempts with the SCT telescope (Meade LX200 ACF 8``). For a long-time enthusiast and user of refractors, switching to SCT is not easy. The need for collimation, cooling and temperature equalization, and even the size and weight of the telescope all seem daunting at first.

 

However, I must say that although I have not yet managed to fully collimate this telescope as recommended by more experienced colleagues from the forum, I am beginning to convince myself of the SCT. The quality of the details already seems promising to me. I have to accept the fact that I cannot afford a refractor that combines the comfort of use with the quality of details shown in this photo. So I will have to make friends with the Allen key :-)

 

 

TYCHO-2021-11-25-2.jpg

Deeply impactful photo. The subtle cyan tint gives me goosebumps. 

Wow. 


  • Achernar likes this

#22 Achernar

Achernar

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,359
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Mobile, Alabama, USA

Posted 04 December 2021 - 10:25 AM

Thanks Taras, I admire photos you take, although I'm not always sure which telescope you used. The ones with the 8 '' Celestron show much higher precision of details than what I have managed to achieve so far. However, I hope that this is not the end of my 8's capabilities - and that I will be able to reach a little further with the Barlow lens. So far I have not had the opportunity to do such a test - for over a month (i.e. since I bought this 8 '') the weather here has been terrible.

 

I know the grain is a critical threshold for sharpening. The graininess is partly due to my laptop's capabilities, limiting the transfer rate and the number of frames I can collect. A small number of frames translates into an increase in graininess.

 

Added to this is my laziness that I never set the mount and guidance too precisely, which results in the image shifting during the session. As a result, some parts of the image are ignored during stacking and are out of focus in the final photo. To deal with this, I stack these fragments separately, which restores their sharpness but increases their graininess due to the reduced number of frames used for such local rescue treatments.

 

I also admit that I have a fairly high grain tolerance for two reasons:

 

First of all, I still remember the times of analog photography. Films with high sensitivity (ISO 400 or more) then had large, clear grain. I am used to treating it as a kind of "technological footprint" - such as a paper texture or a printing raster.

 

Secondly, I have noticed that many colleagues are tempted to abuse the noise reduction filter, which leads to false images showing a perfectly smooth mare surface with very sharp, rare craters. When we play with zooming in on maps and photos taken, for example, by LROC, we see that such situations never happen - the surface is evenly covered with craters, regardless of the zoom level. It seems to me that the presence of grain at the resolution limit of the smallest objects helps to avoid such false image. Instead of pretending that "there's nothing else there" we see that the small details are simply lost in the grain structure and we can not be sure "what's next". In my opinion, this is a much closer to the "truth". :-)

Indeed, when  I was a photojournalist, I was used to using a lot of films such as Tri-X and TMax-P3200, which can be very grainy when I "push processed" them.

 

Taras




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics