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cleaning with air can

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#1 iwols

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 07:55 AM

Hi just wondered if it was ok to use the compressed air cans for cleaning optics/ccd,i know you can buy rocket cleaners but is compressed air better/ok thanks



#2 Frank Otsuka

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 08:01 AM

No.


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#3 Delta608

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 08:04 AM

Agreed....NO


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#4 StarBurger

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 08:20 AM

Definitely not. I blew off dust with a can once and it put more on than it took off. I had the luxury of a microscope to see what it was. Small particles of fiber (maybe from the filters in the compression line) and tiny droplets of oil, I suspect also from same source.

Rocket blower best. At least you are blowing air from a known source. You are breathing it....


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#5 Sincos

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 08:37 AM

Also , definitely no. Compressed air inherently has water droplets created/released when exiting whatever spigot or valve you are using.


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#6 ETtheExtraterrestrial

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 08:40 AM

No, you can force particles into the optics as well.
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#7 PatrickVt

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 08:43 AM

Regardless of what you see/read online, never use canned air on optics.   Use a manual bulb blower instead.

 

Patrick


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#8 alphatripleplus

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 09:34 AM

+1 to all the above comments. A Giotto Rocket Blaster is  inexpensive, safe for your optics, effective and does not run out.


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#9 airbleeder

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 09:39 AM

No.


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#10 iwols

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 09:53 AM

thanks guys thats a big no thenwaytogo.gif



#11 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 10:53 AM

Well..

 

Roland Christen of Astro-Physics uses Chemtronics Ultrajet canned air.. Unfortunately,  only part of the thread is available.

 

657351.jpg

 

 

https://astromart.co...eflective-46437

 

Jon


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#12 SteveG

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 01:45 PM

I use it carefully. Never a problem. I see most here don't like it, but I can say that it does not "force particles into the optics".


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#13 Delta608

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 02:30 PM

Besides the forced air, the accelerent used to get it out of the can also goes onto your equipment...It causes rust on dive equipment can only imagine what it does to optics, tubes and focusers...


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#14 Old Man

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 02:49 PM

NOOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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#15 Paul G

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 10:41 AM

Well..

 

Roland Christen of Astro-Physics uses Chemtronics Ultrajet canned air.. Unfortunately,  only part of the thread is available.

 

657351.jpg

 

 

https://astromart.co...eflective-46437

 

Jon

Roland recommended that Chemtronics UltraJet to me for this purpose.


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#16 Borodog

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 01:13 PM

I use a blow dryer that has a "cool" switch to turn off the heat. Make sure you run it away from the optics for a bit in case any dust has settled in it, and obviously don't use it in a dusty environment where it would be ingesting dust.


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#17 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 08:37 PM

Besides the forced air, the accelerent used to get it out of the can also goes onto your equipment...It causes rust on dive equipment can only imagine what it does to optics, tubes and focusers...

 

It depends on the canned air one is using. Roland Christen recommends Chemtronics Ultrajet

 

https://www.chemtronics.com/ultrajet-2

 

FEATURES & BENEFITS
Nonflammable
Highest powered cleaning strength
Zero VOC
Filtered to 0.2 microns
Leaves no residue
100% ultra-pure HFC-134a
Safe on plastic

 

The standard Chemtronics Duster has the same specs except it's normal cleaning strength. 

 

I don't see anything that could cause rust... I like the filtered to 0.2 microns.. that's mighty tiny, a wave length of green light is 0.55 microns.

 

Jon


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#18 Delta608

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 09:28 PM

It depends on the canned air one is using. Roland Christen recommends Chemtronics Ultrajet

 

https://www.chemtronics.com/ultrajet-2

 

FEATURES & BENEFITS
Nonflammable
Highest powered cleaning strength
Zero VOC
Filtered to 0.2 microns
Leaves no residue
100% ultra-pure HFC-134a
Safe on plastic

 

The standard Chemtronics Duster has the same specs except it's normal cleaning strength. 

 

I don't see anything that could cause rust... I like the filtered to 0.2 microns.. that's mighty tiny, a wave length of green light is 0.55 microns.

 

Jon

 

 

Are we that far into the weeds with this....??

 

It contains refrigerant..equals water and O2...=  Rust.....( Do you see it now?? ) We haven't even touched on the major huffing ingredient...

 

 

 

  From your website:

 

  How can I stop a can of “canned air” aerosol duster from freezing up?

 

This phenomenon occurs due to the expansion of the compressed refrigerant liquid as it dispenses through the aerosol valve and flashes to a gas. If the aerosol is operated for a long period, frost may form on the can because it is freezing the surrounding water vapor from the air. If it is collecting on the material to be cleaned, the operator is dispensing for too long of a period or is dispensing it too close to the material. The frost will evaporate and leave no residue. However, particulate matter blown onto a sensitive surface may cause damage due to the high pressure of the duster if dispensed too closely to that surface.

 

 

Use it or not...!!! 


Edited by Delta608, 06 December 2021 - 09:42 PM.

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#19 sevenofnine

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 09:44 PM

The large Giotto Rocket Blower is 100% controllable & reliable & gets the job done. Why take any risks with your optics?  confused1.gif  


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#20 jlcop

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 10:19 PM

No, don't do it! I made that mistake once. Photography canned air and it split all over my primary mirror.

John


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#21 MrJones

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 11:00 PM

Lol Giotto Rocket Blaster. I think my bulb blower was 99 cents from somewhere. I would rate my canned air success rate at 9 out of 10. Unfortunately those one out of tens made me never want to do it again.
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#22 GrandadCast

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 12:07 AM

I use can air however, leave the can air on the table do not pick it up and move it. If the can moves you will get your frost. Also keep very short burst, 12 inches away and do not use once the can gets cold. 

 

Jess


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#23 astro744

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 12:15 AM

Not recommended.  Scroll down and see what happens at https://televue.com/...i/#.Ya7sDMrZWhA

 

 

 


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#24 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 12:24 AM

Are we that far into the weeds with this....??

 

It contains refrigerant..equals water and O2...=  Rust.....( Do you see it now?? ) We haven't even touched on the major huffing ingredient...

 

 

 

  From your website:

 

  How can I stop a can of “canned air” aerosol duster from freezing up?

 

This phenomenon occurs due to the expansion of the compressed refrigerant liquid as it dispenses through the aerosol valve and flashes to a gas. If the aerosol is operated for a long period, frost may form on the can because it is freezing the surrounding water vapor from the air. If it is collecting on the material to be cleaned, the operator is dispensing for too long of a period or is dispensing it too close to the material. The frost will evaporate and leave no residue. However, particulate matter blown onto a sensitive surface may cause damage due to the high pressure of the duster if dispensed too closely to that surface.

 

 

Use it or not...!!! 

 

Using a refrigerant does not necessarily mean that water will be condensed from the atmosphere. The air in the can is dry.  I understand the thermodynamics of the phase change

 

Using canned air for long periods.. not recommended. Using canned air to dust a lens.. it takes a second or two.. 

 

I have a Rocket Duster.. pretty much worthless around the dusty desert.

 

Jon


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#25 iwols

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 08:05 AM

well ive used the rocket and problem now gone thumbs up for the rocket,thanks for all comments guys


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