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Spring galaxy preview

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#1 Tfer

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 07:27 PM

The other morning, I got up to see Comet Leonard, and noticed that the Spring galaxies were very well positioned.  The advantage from my perspective is the extremely long and dark nights up here right now.

 

By Spring, the sun doesn’t set until 9:00pm, and darkness doesn’t arrive until much later.

 

But right now, it’s BLACK outside until almost 8:00am, giving me 3-4 hours of solid observing time, if I decide to get up early.

 

M-64, the Black Eye galaxy.  Converted to JPEG.  Didn’t even bother cropping out the field rotation artifacts!

 

ASI 294MC camera. 10 second subs for a total integration time of 20 minutes.  Gain 450.

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#2 alphatripleplus

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 08:05 PM

The early EAA bird catches the worm! Nice capture, but too early for some of us late risers.wink.gif


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#3 Mark Lovik

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Posted 08 December 2021 - 01:34 PM

I was looking to look at some galaxies around 4:30 in the morning a couple days ago (farther south from your location).  I was pumped getting a good morning image of M3 and Comet Leonard last week.  No luck -- clouds had just rolled in.  However:

 

This time of morning is good for the next week or so when the moon sets early.  M81 and M82 are high in the sky at this time, and even M101 and M51 are starting to look good.  To the right of these galaxies ... it's starting to look good for galaxy hunting in the eastern sky!  It's strange that Orion is starting to set in the wee-morning hours (it makes sense ... just does not feel right).

 

Later in December -- it's back to evening imaging before the moonrise!

 

PS - like your image!


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#4 alphatripleplus

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Posted 08 December 2021 - 06:25 PM

You guys are making me feel like a slacker for not hitting the sky in the early morning.lol.gif


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#5 Ptarmigan

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Posted 08 December 2021 - 07:19 PM

I would like to enjoy winter objects first. wink.gif


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#6 Mark Lovik

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Posted 09 December 2021 - 12:08 PM

I would like to enjoy winter objects first. wink.gif

Agreed ... there are some great objects in the winter skies.

 

With the moon starting to be an issue in the early evening -- dark skies are in the morning for the next week or so!

Then it's ugh for deep sky objects for a week

.... Then back to dark winter skies!

 

I even did visual last night ... last look at Jupiter, Venus, Saturn, and the moon.

Even looked at M31, 32, 110 for a bit in surburban skies visually -- it's the reason I like EAA.  EAA views are like really dark sky views (1000 miles away from me) ... or better.


Edited by Mark Lovik, 09 December 2021 - 12:09 PM.

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#7 Tfer

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Posted 11 December 2021 - 11:30 PM

This morning at 6:30am. 
 

Grabbed my coffee before work, and checked outside out of habit.

 

Clear skies, but SMOKY!  With the cost of natural gas, it’s getting expensive to heat homes, so the wood burning stoves are running full tilt.   Checked the long range forecast and realized that this might be the last time I have to look around for a week or so, so I opened the observatory and imaged M95 while I made my lunch.  Transparency was terrible, but beggars can’t be choosers.

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Edited by Tfer, 11 December 2021 - 11:31 PM.

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#8 Stargazer3236

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Posted 17 December 2021 - 05:11 AM

I typically EAA image from dusk till dawn. If I go out for a night of EAA, then I want to make sure I can do so for at least 5 hours, but I sometimes get that urge to stay out until the Sun rises. I have been catching Spring galaxies lately.



#9 BrentKnight

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Posted 19 December 2021 - 02:30 AM

Last year, Spring season was very bad - clouds and rain it seemed every night.  I wanted to finish up my H400 and most of the objects I lack are in Coma/Virgo, so I suppose the earliest start I can get, the better my chances of getting some of these.  I've still got so much I want to see in the Winter season though...


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#10 alphatripleplus

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Posted 19 December 2021 - 08:49 AM

If you don't mind searching out smaller and more obscure galaxies, there are usually enough out there to keep you busy in any season. Galaxy season can actually feel overwhelming as there are just too many showpieces to choose from - at least that's how it can sometimes seem to me. lol.gif


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#11 Cey42

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Posted 19 December 2021 - 02:56 PM

+1 on Errols comment. I did not appreciate how many galaxies were visible to us until I got my 294MM. The extra sensitivity of it over my 294MC, really allowed me to view many smaller and fainter galaxies. Now I am viewing galaxies all year long and slowly working through the ARP & HCG catalogs.


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#12 alphatripleplus

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Posted 19 December 2021 - 03:10 PM

It took me almost a year to get through the Arp catalog, and I haven't really started the HCGs in earnest.   There are also many galaxy clusters to look at. Lots of fun ahead.


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#13 BrentKnight

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Posted 19 December 2021 - 03:28 PM

If you don't mind searching out smaller and more obscure galaxies, there are usually enough out there to keep you busy in any season. Galaxy season can actually feel overwhelming as there are just too many showpieces to choose from - at least that's how it can sometimes seem to me. lol.gif

Andromeda, Perseus are just overflowing with galaxy targets.  You are certainly correct that they are everywhere.  It's just been a personal goal of mine to finish the Herschel objects.  Arp objects are right up there on my list too.


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#14 Ptarmigan

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Posted 19 December 2021 - 08:03 PM

If you don't mind searching out smaller and more obscure galaxies, there are usually enough out there to keep you busy in any season. Galaxy season can actually feel overwhelming as there are just too many showpieces to choose from - at least that's how it can sometimes seem to me. lol.gif

That is what I do in Galaxy Season. Look for obscure objects. That is why I got into EAA. To see obscure objects. It can be overwhelming. cool.gif wink.gif lol.gif


Edited by Ptarmigan, 19 December 2021 - 08:04 PM.

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#15 Stargazer3236

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Posted 20 December 2021 - 12:51 AM

That ain't the half of it. I experience the same thing when searching for obscure planetary nebula and galaxies!


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#16 alphatripleplus

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Posted 20 December 2021 - 09:26 AM

Yes, it is almost impossible to run out of galaxies with EAA tools if you have a long enough focal length scope and the patience to find and identify them.


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#17 Eclipsed

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Posted 20 December 2021 - 07:45 PM

That ain't the half of it. I experience the same thing when searching for obscure planetary nebula and galaxies!

With your determination and persistence on finding these obscure and small planetary nebulae, you have got me hooked trying to find as many as I can and snapping quick EAA captures.  I think there must be hundreds, if not thousands of PN/s within the range of my 8" SCT and lowly ASI178MC camera!  


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#18 Stargazer3236

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Posted 21 December 2021 - 02:10 AM

With your determination and persistence on finding these obscure and small planetary nebulae, you have got me hooked trying to find as many as I can and snapping quick EAA captures.  I think there must be hundreds, if not thousands of PN/s within the range of my 8" SCT and lowly ASI178MC camera!  

Well, the magnitude limit of your scope and camera is probably around 17. I typically do not image planetary nebula much below 16-16.5 because of the faintness and size. The large a planetary nebula is, the fainter it becomes, regardless of magnitude due to the light being spread out over a wider field of view. So a mag 12 planetary nebula of say 30 arc seconds in diameter is viewable, however that same magnitude with a 60 arc second or larger object will be noticeably dimmer since the light is spread out over a wider FOV. Try this website out for really obscure planetary nebula: https://skyhuntblog....ula-candidates/ or this one: http://www.nomolosx....les-planetaries or this one: https://www.imagingd...lae-images.html

 

Good luck!


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#19 alphatripleplus

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Posted 21 December 2021 - 08:28 AM

Moderator Note:

 

Everyone, let's stay on the topic of galaxies please. Thanks. 



#20 steveincolo

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Posted 21 December 2021 - 09:43 AM

Hopefully back on topic: what filter, if any, do you all prefer for galaxies, and why?  Does it depend on the conditions and the particular galaxy?  Options for me are none, UV/IR cut, UHC, and the Optolong L-Pro.  



#21 Tfer

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Posted 21 December 2021 - 10:00 AM

This capture was from last Spring, and I’ll be trying it again when the opportunity arises.

 

I love pushing my scope.  Seeing how far back in time I can possibly look.

 

The histogram here has obviously been pushed way past the ‘pretty picture’ limit, but it was necessary to bring these out.

 

It was a 40 minute capture, using the 1100 and the ASI294MC.  The 3 galaxies circled in red are each 1.4 billion light years away.  The 2 circled in yellow are 1.7 and 2.2 billion light years away.  When that light left there, our planet had just begun the  Great Oxidation Event; oxygen began to accumulate in our atmosphere.

 

This cluster is centered around NGC 3651.

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Edited by Tfer, 21 December 2021 - 10:03 AM.

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#22 Tfer

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Posted 21 December 2021 - 10:36 AM

Hopefully back on topic: what filter, if any, do you all prefer for galaxies, and why?  Does it depend on the conditions and the particular galaxy?  Options for me are none, UV/IR cut, UHC, and the Optolong L-Pro.  

I don’t have much experience with the various types of filters.  I’ve used a Celestron UHC successfully in the past on nebulae and brighter galaxies.  On the dimmest ones, I’m unsure whether the cost of losing the light would be worth it…?

 

Would the galaxies in the image I posted above this be visible if ANY light had been filtered?

 

Once the Christmas bills are paid, I’ll be ordering the Hutech EAA filter - I love that it threads into existing ZWO cameras; no filter wheels or drawers.

 

I’ll check back when I have some experience with it.


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#23 alphatripleplus

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Posted 21 December 2021 - 11:34 AM

My experience with filters and broadband targets like galaxies is that under low levels of LP, you are better off without any type of filter - I now have roughly Bortle 4 skies and don't use filters for spring or other time galaxy viewing. If you are under heavy LP, you can boost contrast on broadband targets like galaxies by using a near infrared pass filter or even a #29 deep red filter. The contrast boost results from blocking LP in most of the visible sprectrum and letting infrared pass. I used to do that under Bortle 8 skies,  but be prepared for longer total exposures.


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#24 Tfer

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Posted 21 December 2021 - 01:36 PM

Andromeda, Perseus are just overflowing with galaxy targets.  You are certainly correct that they are everywhere.  It's just been a personal goal of mine to finish the Herschel objects.  Arp objects are right up there on my list too.

Pegasus has thousands!


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#25 Ptarmigan

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Posted 22 December 2021 - 10:36 PM

Andromeda, Perseus are just overflowing with galaxy targets.  You are certainly correct that they are everywhere.  It's just been a personal goal of mine to finish the Herschel objects.  Arp objects are right up there on my list too.

Andromeda, Pegasus, Perseus, Lynx, Orion, and even Auriga have plenty of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Galaxies are everywhere. Every season has plenty of galaxies. It so happens spring is called galaxy season because most of the prominent objects are galaxies and the Milky Way is not prominent. I even consider fall galaxy season because of Andromeda, Pegasus, and Perseus.

 

I like to see MACS J0717.5+3745. It is in Auriga.

http://cdsportal.u-s...CS J0717.5+3745

 

How about RD1 in Triangulum?

http://cdsportal.u-s...899972222222225

 

Hubble Ultra Deep Field?

http://cdsportal.u-s...ltra Deep Field


Edited by Ptarmigan, 22 December 2021 - 10:45 PM.

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