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EQ MOUNTS WITH OR WITHOUT ENCODER ( EC )

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#1 Raco1234

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Posted 14 January 2022 - 11:50 PM

Any thoughts re mounts with encoders verses no encoders i am trying to determine if you are " Guiding "  not tracking with a guide scope how much really does and encoder make because my thoughts are that the mount is always making corrections to stars regardless of encoder or not ????



#2 f300v10

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 12:17 AM

If you are guiding encoders can may reduce your guide error slightly but they are not required, assuming a quality mount that does not suffer from extreme periodic error or backlash.

 

A mount with encoders that is being run un-guided is not "making corrections to stars", rather it tracks to the position of the encoder.  Encoders can correct/eliminate periodic error in the RA axis, and backlash in the dec axis, but the will not correct for polar alignment or other errors such as flexure.  To run unguided at medium to high focal lengths, proper sky modeling software such as APCC-Pro or The SkyX is generally needed to account for alignment errors, atmospheric diffraction and flexure.



#3 Raco1234

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 12:23 AM

ok so im on correct path of thinking if Im Guiding and Not Tracking Encoders serve little to no purpose



#4 AgilityGuy

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 01:19 AM

Depends if you want to guide.  A premium mount with precision encoders will perform well without guiding, especially when combined with the ability to use a pointing/tracking model.  When I say perform well I mean deliver sub images with pinpoint stars as long as you want to expose them.  You can always use a guider with an encoder equipped mount but it’s not going to be making many corrections.  Of course it depends on the focal length you’re imaging. A short focal length telescope combined with an encoder mount means you’ll likely never have to guide.  Longer focal length scopes may need guiding but the guider will not be working as hard as it would if there were no encoders. If you have a precision mount that can deliver 5 minute or longer subs with pinpoint stars I’m betting you’ll put the guidescope in a drawer and forget about it.  


Edited by AgilityGuy, 15 January 2022 - 01:23 AM.

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#5 Sacred Heart

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 11:13 AM

Any thoughts re mounts with encoders verses no encoders i am trying to determine if you are " Guiding "  not tracking with a guide scope how much really does and encoder make because my thoughts are that the mount is always making corrections to stars regardless of encoder or not ????

My understanding of precision encoders is,  it is in constant communication with the mount control software,  the short story - doing it's own guiding based on the fact the mount always knows where it is and the software knows where it should be.  Hence long unguided exposures.   When you buy Astro Physics and Software Bisque  mounts with the encoders that is what you get and more.  Reliability, repeatability,  day after day, year after year.   You might even be using it remotely.   Yes you need to be precisely polar aligned and have a good all sky pointing model running,  but AP and SB have the software for that,  I forgot to mention you also get support,  excellent support.   This all comes at a price.

 

You get a good decent respectable mount,  Losmandy, CEM 70 and 120, EQR 6, and the like, with a good polar alignment and pointing model,  with a guide scope and camera or OAG and camera you can get pretty decent images as well.  

 

It is all about what you want to do and how you want to do it.  

 

I own a Paramount ME and a Losmandy G11T,   yes a learning curve to both,  also both just work no problems once past learning curve.           My opinion,   Joe




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