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Accessories Beginner Equipment Eyepieces Filters Dob
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#1 JayLarb

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 04:14 AM

Hi, I’m completely new to the whole astronomy side of things. I’ve always loved space and that but have never owned or even looked through a decent telescope. I have decided that I now want to make this a permanent hobby after falling in love with it even looking at the moon through some cheap binoculars. I have been doing some research over the past week and I narrowed it down to two telescopes:

Dob 150p https://www.firstlig...ut_this_product

OR

Dob 200p https://www.firstlig...-dobsonian.html

Both of these telescopes have great reviews so I think I’ve ultimately decided on maybe the 150p as it allows a little bit of budget for some extra eyepieces and/or filters to go with it - from what I’ve read, these are pretty important to budget in?

So, do you think this is right choice to make for a beginner and if so, do you have any advice on which eyepieces/filters to invest in to make my experience better?

Thanks!
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#2 luxo II

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 04:23 AM

If it’s going to be a dob, get the largest aperture you can (200mm).

It’s also worth noting 200mm brings an interesting number of galaxies within reach in dark skies, whereas those visible in a 150mm you can count on 1 hand.

Edited by luxo II, 15 January 2022 - 04:24 AM.


#3 JayLarb

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 04:35 AM

Thanks mate, I would love to get the largest one but unfortunately I just haven’t got the money to get that one. That’s why it’s was narrowed down to either the 150p or 200p. It’s a stand off between getting the 200p with no extra eye pieces/filters to start with, or getting the 150p and being to able to get a few extra bits with it.

#4 luxo II

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 05:13 AM

Have you considered secondhand ?

If there’s a club near you they probably can assist.

Edited by luxo II, 15 January 2022 - 05:41 AM.


#5 JayLarb

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 05:19 AM

I hadn’t actually, but I’ll have a look today. Thanks

#6 Alex65

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 05:39 AM

The 6" (150mm) Dob would be a great beginners telescope. Ignore those who go on about big apertures being necessary; 6" is plenty big enough to keep you observing for years. I have a 6" f8 Dob  and I can assure you that you'll see more than five galaxies with it!

 

There is also a size and weight differance that you need to consider with the two. The 6" will be easier to haul around and store than the bigger (in weight and size) 8" (200mm) Dob.

 

You won't need too many eyepieces for the 6" Dob, just a low, medium and high and perhaps a Barlow. The two eyepieces that I use most often are a 15mm (80x) and a 8mm (150x).


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#7 clearwaterdave

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 08:01 AM

I say get the size you think you will be most comfy using.,.I can see many many galaxies in my 4" refractor.,and even more in my 5" reflector.,ymmv good luck with your choices.,

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#8 MellonLake

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 08:23 AM

You have to use a telescope to make it a worthwhile purchase.  If the telescope is too big and you don't use it because it takes too long to set up and use then a smaller telescope would be better. 

 

Having said that, especially if you have access to dark skies, bigger apertures help with all objects.  For DSOs, the light gathering power goes up with square of the radius.  So an 8" is 1.8X lager than a 6" and a 10" is 2.7X larger than a 6".  That is a very large difference when it comes to DSOs.  In my experience, DSOs really start to pop and look impressive in a 10", especially under very dark non-light polluted skies.    If you can find a used 10" and don't find it too large to move and set up (they are pretty big), then I would buy the used 10" over an 8".  But again, a telescope is only good if you are going to use it.  

 

A 10" will show you thousands of DSOs.  In a couple hours alone (in very dark skies and very good conditions) I found 70 galaxies in about 2 hours with my 10" in the constellation Virgo alone.   With a 6 in. aperture, I would not have been able to find half as many (I have a 5 in. refractor which has a similar light gathering power to a 6" reflector so have tested this).   

 

A lot of astronomers always wish for more aperture.  More aperture means more visible objects and more detail in objects.   

 

Rob



#9 Sacred Heart

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 08:56 AM

Hi, I’m completely new to the whole astronomy side of things. I’ve always loved space and that but have never owned or even looked through a decent telescope. I have decided that I now want to make this a permanent hobby after falling in love with it even looking at the moon through some cheap binoculars. I have been doing some research over the past week and I narrowed it down to two telescopes:

Dob 150p https://www.firstlig...ut_this_product

OR

Dob 200p https://www.firstlig...-dobsonian.html

Both of these telescopes have great reviews so I think I’ve ultimately decided on maybe the 150p as it allows a little bit of budget for some extra eyepieces and/or filters to go with it - from what I’ve read, these are pretty important to budget in?

So, do you think this is right choice to make for a beginner and if so, do you have any advice on which eyepieces/filters to invest in to make my experience better?

Thanks!

Welcome to Cloudy Nights.   When it comes to getting a telescope several things come to mind,  what you want to see, how big do I need, how much is it,  some things don't come to mind at first.  Where am I going to store this,  this is heavy.

 

Get the scope you not only can afford but do not mind moving, setting up, tearing down and storing.   As for viewing you will just have to be happy with what you can see.

 

A Dob is a good choice because of size for the money.   I would recommend if you are getting a telescope to first learn how to use it,  meaning a Dob usually is not a go to automated scope.  If you have a computer or a sky map / catalog with coordinates  learn how to find objects in the sky based on those coordinates.  The Alt and AZ coordinates.

 

  The one benefit you get from a manual scope is you will learn the sky,  where galaxies are, star clusters.

 

As for eyepieces,   just guessing here,  for wide field viewing 20 to 50 power,   planets and Moon up to 100 power.  For general eyepiece power / magnification,  take the eyepiece size, say 26 MM and divide it in to the scopes focal length, say 1000MM  and you get just under 40 power.    Eyepieces are a game of their own, meaning different designs, give different FOV's at about the same power.      Maybe someone here can explain it,  or give Televue a call and they can explain for sure.     Link is below.

 

I just got in to low power viewing and really enjoy it,  I get to see the whole cluster or Orion Nebula.   That's another thing, to me anyway, my eyes - I wear coke bottles for glasses,   all of these galaxies and smaller nebulas may look like smudges or a fuzzy patch.   Hence large aperture is for faint fuzzies.  A large aperture will open up  M13 a globular cluster and make it appear as an open cluster.     For me to see formation in galaxies I need an astro camera and stack pictures.  That is EAA.   For that you will need a tracking telescope, camera, computer and a bottle of aspirin, for the little headaches.  You can research what people use for EAA.      

 

Anyway, good luck and have fun,  again welcome to CN.   Joe



#10 Sacred Heart

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 08:57 AM

I forgot the link,  sorry.  Joe

 

https://www.televue....b_page.asp?id=3



#11 Notdarkenough

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 11:27 AM

As mentioned previously, determining what scope to get depends on what you want to see, and what your local column of atmosphere you will be looking through will support. If you live in a big city (with lots of light pollution) and manual dob might be tough. Before buying, connect with the local astro club and see what works for your location and your preferred targets. And, thousands of local libraries have telescopes you can check-out and try. For example, in my little valley (maybe 55k population combined?), there are nine libraries that all received a telescope from the local club and the Astronomical Leauge. It is a great little 4.5" Orion Starblast tabletop Dob (Newt) with a very serviceable Celestron 8-24mm Zoom eyepiece, a red-light headlamp, any excellent star chart and a very handy Quick Start Guide written by my local club for local viewing conditions. What an excellent resource. I don't live in New Hampshire, but this program has grown across the US and has similar programs in many other countries. Check it out:

 https://www.astrolea...lescope-program



#12 Spile

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 05:21 PM

I have the 200P and it is a brilliant telescope. I’ve created a blog that has my review and a number of tips and suggestions based on my experiences of using it. The link is below. 



#13 PKDfan

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 06:45 PM

For the life of me I can't fathom WHY someone would say you can only see LESS than a half dozen galaxies with a 6inch scope!!

 

Completely ludicrous.

 

 

 

 

Anyways Jay, the 150mm Dob is a perfect starter scope. To get your feet wet with the idiosyncrasies of using a Newtonian type optical system.

 

If you really like it then you can sell it for something bigger OR a different system. Apo refractor, Maksutov etc.

 

A great great choice is to stick with its supplied eyepieces for a time and then I highly recommend a value zoom as your first eyepiece purchase.

 

That was my plan and it worked to tell me what powers I enjoyed best and what my seeing ceiling was normally at for my site with my 4" apo. I use it all the time with my Barlow on the moon. Its a perfect use there!!

 

I wish you many many hours under clear dark steady skies with your new scope!

 

It WILL surely amaze and delight you!

 

 

Clear skies & Good seeing

 




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