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Planet killers

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23 replies to this topic

#1 Roger Belveal

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 09:41 AM

As far as reflectors are concerned. What is your idea of a planet killer? Pictures are quite welcomed!🤔

#2 CHASLX200

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 09:47 AM

All of my Starmaster and Obsession Dobs in the sizes of 11 to 18" were my best planet killers out of over 260 scopes. I got the seeing to let them high end optics show their stuff at 600 to 1150x.


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#3 dmgriff

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 10:10 AM

Old school would be slow newts. 6in to 10in. Larger and you get into transportation and usage problems with a slow newtonian. Orthos and plossl eps. Also the best optics you can afford.

 

For practical purposes:

 

6in f/8 - f/10

 

8in f/7

 

10in f/6

 

My 6in f/8 OOUK on a gem...

DSC00102
Once a dream scope, now considered the smallest planet killer/general use by many.

 

With todays high end fast optics and matching eps (somewhat expensive to me), anything that will give you a pristine image is a Planet Killer.

 

Good viewing,

 

Dave


Edited by dmgriff, 15 January 2022 - 04:25 PM.

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#4 Keith Rivich

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 10:19 AM

My 25" f/5. Best views of Jupiter and Saturn I have ever had was earlier this year on a night of excellent seeing. For quick looks outside my house I use my 8" f/9 newt. Always gives good views. 


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#5 CHASLX200

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 11:07 AM

Also all of my old school 8" F/6 TO 8 Newts were great also.

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#6 Bomber Bob

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 12:33 PM

40 year-old Meade Model 826 (8" F6) on a StarFinder EQ:

 

Meade 826 Restore S01 - Lumicon 125 HF.jpg

 

Made my APM 152ED F8 redundant.

 

*** I sure wish I'd gotten The Clue about 8" Newts decades ago...  so much planetary detail I've missed.  And, on the flip side, I have no problem going after Fuzzies in town, because now they're not so Faint.  ***  [Ain't that right, CHAS?  (My 826 is one of his former scopes.)]


Edited by Bomber Bob, 15 January 2022 - 02:59 PM.

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#7 Roger Belveal

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 12:36 PM

All of my Starmaster and Obsession Dobs in the sizes of 11 to 18" were my best planet killers out of over 260 scopes. I got the seeing to let them high end optics show their stuff at 600 to 1150x.


Edited by Roger Belveal, 15 January 2022 - 12:50 PM.


#8 BillB

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 01:22 PM

For me it was an Intes MN61 mounted on a GM8 mount. Once the OTA cooled down, powers up to 400-600 were easily doable if the atmosphere cooperated.

  Bill


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#9 DAVIDG

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 01:56 PM

 My 8" f/7 I made 25 years ago. Won best optics at Stellafane in 1996. It has served me well all these years.  Give wonderfully sharp images of the planets. 

 

                  - Dave

 

8 f7 5 30 2020.jpg  


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#10 Bill Weir

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 02:51 PM

This one.  f/3.3 508mm. Mars last go around was amazing. Jupiter and Saturn show so much colour and detail if the seeing it good. If the seeing isn’t good then no scope gives a good view. It also helps if the planets aren’t creeping their way along close to the horizon like Jupiter and Saturn have been the last few years from my latitude.

 

Bill

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#11 Bomber Bob

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 03:01 PM

Also all of my old school 8" F/6 TO 8 Newts were great also.

Sorry, CHAS!  I love ya better than my luggage; but you know, every time this topic comes up, I just have to pick on ya about that Meade 826...


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#12 CHASLX200

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 05:24 PM

Sorry, CHAS!  I love ya better than my luggage; but you know, every time this topic comes up, I just have to pick on ya about that Meade 826...

Had a few of the Meade 8" F/6's and the newer Stafinders and all were good.


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#13 CHASLX200

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 05:25 PM

Here is a scope i had Parks build for me. Way oversize for the mount.

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#14 a__l

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 07:13 PM

As far as reflectors are concerned. What is your idea of a planet killer? Pictures are quite welcomed!

There is no single answer to this question. There are several factors here.
Observation conditions.
Complete confidence in the quality of your optics. Independent interferometric test.
Astroceramic optics and good cooling.
Then you will have complete confidence that it will be a killer.


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#15 Kutno

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 08:54 PM

As far as reflectors are concerned. What is your idea of a planet killer? Pictures are quite welcomed!

 

A fine 10" Dob, with fine mirrors, a fine focuser, a fine binoviewer, fine eyepieces, and a fine atmosphere. 


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#16 vtornado

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Posted 15 January 2022 - 10:33 PM

Best view I ever had of Jupiter was from my 10 inch f/5 dob. 

A lot of that was seeing.  Most of the time in the upper midwest large scopes are capped by seeing.


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#17 Deep13

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 01:27 AM

I'm thinking an 8" (200mm) f/8 on those rotating rings. It would need a really big mount.
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#18 HoundDog

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 06:47 AM

I have an 8 inch F7 Discovery dob. I think it qualifies as a planet killer.


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#19 bobhen

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 07:27 AM

At my Northeastern location: an 8 F8 or 10” F7 with a Zambuto mirror, acclimation fans, curved spider, small secondary, FT 2-speed focuser, extended tube section beyond the focuser on a driven platform using high quality eyepieces.  

 

If I lived farther south, like Florida: then the same as above but with a larger mirror and probably F6.

 

Of course I could have a 15” Dob built for my location in PA and then wait for that one night every 15-years where I could actually use 600x or more on Saturn, which was exactly the case at this location when I owned my C11 for 15-years. But that seems counterproductive.

 

Bob


Edited by bobhen, 16 January 2022 - 07:28 AM.

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#20 CrazyPanda

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 08:18 AM

Any scope with quality optics and a binoviewer!


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#21 George N

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 11:03 AM

There is no single answer to this question. There are several factors here.
Observation conditions.
Complete confidence in the quality of your optics. Independent interferometric test.
Astroceramic optics and good cooling.
Then you will have complete confidence that it will be a killer.

....and if the planet happens to be below 40 degrees in altitude -- add an Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector to 'kick it up a notch" -- ADCs are not just for imaging - they work visually too. I've used my ZWO ADC on several APOs, my Celestron C-9.25 and my Obsession 20 (with appropriate Barlow to get to the correct working F-ratio) -- in every case there was an admittedly modest, but noticeable improvement in planetary views.

 

My best views ever of Jupiter & Saturn -- were thru my Obsession 20 -- best views of Mars were thru a friend's Obsession 20. Both were clearly showing better views than a C-14 or two Astro-Physics 6" APOs set up right next to them -- and that was an opinion shared by a number of viewers. On the other hand - my ATM 8-inch F/8 Newt has always provided great solar/lunar/planet views.


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#22 J Inman

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Posted 16 January 2022 - 01:45 PM

My 8” f/12 is my personal “planet killer” although the best view of the planets that I’ve had was through a 10” Buchroeder Tri-Schiefspigler.

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#23 Spikey131

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Posted Yesterday, 07:44 AM

This 12.5" f/7 ATM dob does a fine job on the planet, when my seeing in the Northeast US allows it.

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#24 Jon Isaacs

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Posted Yesterday, 08:18 AM

Lots of ways to murder those planets..  The best views I have had of the planets have been in my 22 inch F/4.4 and the previous 25 inch F/5.. A stable night and a large scope with decent optics is unbeatable.  But those scopes are meant for deep sky and are/were located in the high desert where the seeing is usually not the best.  

 

Along the coast in urban San Diego generally has much better seeing and that is where I do most of my planetary observing.  Were about 5 miles from the Pacific Ocean so the temperatures are stable and there is very often a gentle "laminar flow" breeze off the ocean and seeing can be very good.  Planet killing begins with the seeing, not the scope.  

 

My favorite planetary/double star scope is my 13.1 inch F/5.5 Starsplitter.  The downside is that it has a full thickness mirror so I have to make a real effort to get it cooled down but with San Diego's mild temperatures and poorly insulated homes, it is very doable.  The mirror was made by Robert Royce and the scope has a 20% CO so it does a good job.  

 

6446676-Birthday Dob CN.jpg
 
The downside of those evening breezes off the nearby ocean is that very often the clouds roll in and put an end to the evening rather abruptly.  Sometimes though, they fool me and 15 minutes later, the sky is clear again and maybe clear for hours to come.  
 
My 10 inch F/5 GSO Dob does a good job on the planets and I have enjoyed many night viewing the big planets at 410x as they drift across the sky.
 
Jon

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