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Help needed with specific lens/filter selections - getting started

Beginner Dob DSO Eyepieces Filters Reflector Visual
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#1 Poppashrink

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 02:42 PM

I just scored a great deal on a beautiful condition Orion XT8 Dob, and the only lens with it was an Orion 35mm DeepView multi-coated 2”. We’ve been having some fierce winds here since getting this scope (thanks Telescope gods - a sacrifice is planned).  

 

So in the mean time thanks to all I’ve read here on CN: I’ve collimated the mirrors (Svbony next generation Laser Collimator came with scope), aligned the Orion 6x30mm Correct-Image Rt. Angle (also included) to the OTA, From the reading I’ve been doing here I know I’ll will need some other “get started” started lens(es). I plan to go slowly and use basics, until I learn how to star hop, and figure out what other lenses I may or may not want.

 

Yes I bought a copy of Turn Left at Orion, and my copy of Nightwatch should be arriving shortly. Yes I’ve wadded through a gaggle of beginner threads!
 

I live in the hillside suburbs of Los Angeles (burbank) with Bortle c5 skies. I can get to 3 or 4 areas within an hour or two drive. I’m recently retired, and getting reacquainted with my old uneducated Astronomy hobby. I had a Celestron 4” Reflector on a clunky wooden tripod, back in the before smartphone/internet era of the 80-90’s, for a dozen or so years.  

Now a couple of questions:

1) what will the 35mm DeepView lens be best for viewing?

 

2) Looks to me the Alpine Astronomical Baader Hyperion 8-24mm Mark IV Zoom Eyepiece (1.25"/2") with 2.25x Modular Barlow Lens, would give me a lot of quality/experimentation “bang for my buck” for the next year+/-. Is this correct thinking or is there a better way to go? Money and my agreeable wife are not big issues. I wear glasses and have Rt eye severe impairment.

 

3) I believe I need a moon filter, but I get a bit lost on all the conflicting & highly technical lens/filter discussions and varied views in the many filter/thread CN threads - suggestions based on my situation below would be great!

 

4) I want to view DSO, Planets, and things that go woosh in the night. I know I will need darker skies to be wowed, but I’m going to be mostly viewing locally, until I have enough knowledge, experience, and sky buddies to be fully addicted. What filters and or lenses would make my viewing more enjoyable/rewarding to star in the next year?

 

5) I’ve tried (not too hard) to connect with local Astronomy clubs, but have not had success in getting responses. Is there a good way to approach this? **** this virus!!!!

 

Thanks for being here, your wise offerings that I’ve already gleaned from CN, and offering any direct suggestions!



#2 Mike Q

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 03:03 PM

The only thing I will mention about filters is not to forget there is a polarized filter that is variable. It let you reduce the amount of light coming through. It's the only thing I use when looking at the moon. It works quite well.
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#3 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 03:06 PM

Hi:

 

You have yourself a fine telescope..

 

- The 35 mm Deep view will be a nice finder eyepiece and provide some low power wide field view with stars that aren't too sharp out towards the edge of the field.

 

- The Baader zoom is a good choice, dial in the magnification. A Barlow is a useful addition.. 

 

- People use moon filters, I never do. The moon seems bright if your eye is dark adapted but viewing the moon is best done with your eye done in photopic vision, daylight color, high res mode. I let my eye adapt. And the moon is actually on the dim side at the higher magnifications used to see detail.

 

- With the Baader and the zoom, you're setup for some nice views..

 

Jon


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#4 MellonLake

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 03:10 PM


1) Get a sight tube to ensure the secondary is centered and rounded as the first step of collimation. The Astrosystems 2" light Pipe is ideal and can be used to all the collimation steps if the laser battery does not work

2) A Telrad or Rigel Systems finder. This is to help find objects. It is more important than eyepieces. It is hard to find objects with just an RA finder.

3) An 8 to 10mm eyepiece. The cost of eyepieces can range from $50 to $1000+. The paradigm eyepieces are good value and starting point. See our sponsor above. 82° eyepieces are even nicer for the wider view but cost a bunch more. This eyepiece will work for planets and smaller DSOs. Note most even cheap eyepieces give a sharp view in the middle of the field of view. I have seen cloud patterns on Saturn with a $30 Plossl. And 5 of Saturn's moons.

4) A good chair. I used a step stool for a while. Dobs are made to be used seated.

5) A good nebla filter like a Lumicon Ultra High Contrast filter. Note that other than a moon filter to reduce brightness, this is the only filter you really need.
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#5 DHurst

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 08:03 PM

Congrats on the scope!  The zoom, barlow, and adjustable chair will keep you going well for a while.

BTW If you’re in or around Burbank you’re in bottle 9 or 8 at best.



#6 Poppashrink

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 08:10 PM

The only thing I will mention about filters is not to forget there is a polarized filter that is variable. It let you reduce the amount of light coming through. It's the only thing I use when looking at the moon. It works quite well.

Any preferred brands in the 2" variable polarized filter. Ice, Svbony, or one of the higher priced ones? 

 

Anyone heard of "Luzid" brass variable polarizing filter on Amazon?

 

also Two Telrads are available. one has only red LED,  and the other is switchable between red or green LED light; any preferences? 


Edited by Poppashrink, 22 January 2022 - 09:26 PM.


#7 MellonLake

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 08:14 PM

I have the svbony. It works perfectly. They are pretty simple filters so I see no need for the expensive ones.

#8 SloMoe

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 08:53 PM

Don't get too carried away in the beginning, just get used to the scope and how it works, Jon's suggestion of a zoom 8 to 24 will be the best for starters and you never run out of uses for a good zoom.

The Barlow in a few months.

 

Once you get into the hobby a few months of reading and staring you'll have a much better idea of what you want.

 

A lot of times beginners start a buying spree before learning how the scope will benifit with certain eyepieces & filters.



#9 vtornado

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Posted 22 January 2022 - 08:54 PM

Once you get the zoom, you have a nice setup.  Just start observing and see what you need to round out your kit.

The celestron zoom is 90% of the baader for 30% of the price.

Much of this hobby is personal preference a journey of personal discovery.


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#10 Poppashrink

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 12:34 PM

Thanks everyone - great suggestions! I appreciate all of the help!! I got out last night viewing, was working on the Orion Nebula. Can’t wait for my zoom to arrive on Wednesday.

#11 Mike Q

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 12:48 PM

Any preferred brands in the 2" variable polarized filter. Ice, Svbony, or one of the higher priced ones? 

 

Anyone heard of "Luzid" brass variable polarizing filter on Amazon?

 

also Two Telrads are available. one has only red LED,  and the other is switchable between red or green LED light; any preferences? 

Right now I only have one in 1.25 inch, it's an Orion but it works very well.  When I get around to getting a 2 inch it will be an Orion as well.



#12 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 04:13 PM

I never use a moon filter.  I either turn on a white light or employ higher magnifications to "dilute" the image brightness.

 

As Jon mentioned, there will likely be some field-edge astigmatism present with the 3-lens-element 35mm DeepView eyepiece.



#13 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 04:30 PM

Mellonlake has offered quite a few good suggestions, especially regarding getting a Telrad or Rigel QuikFinder and an observing chair.


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#14 Poppashrink

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 05:05 PM

Picking up the chair today, and ordering a Telrad. Do people advise a traditional red style, or the red/green switchable Telrad?

#15 MellonLake

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 05:56 PM

Only Red is advisable! The green will eliminate your night vision.

#16 Poppashrink

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 08:29 PM

Only Red is advisable! The green will eliminate your night vision.



#17 Poppashrink

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 08:30 PM

Thanks for the information- red it is!

#18 Echolight

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Posted 23 January 2022 - 11:03 PM

I like using the Baader zoom and a barlow for high power viewing. It’s awfully convenient. 


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#19 Starman1

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Posted 24 January 2022 - 12:00 AM

I just scored a great deal on a beautiful condition Orion XT8 Dob, and the only lens with it was an Orion 35mm DeepView multi-coated 2”. We’ve been having some fierce winds here since getting this scope (thanks Telescope gods - a sacrifice is planned).

So in the mean time thanks to all I’ve read here on CN: I’ve collimated the mirrors (Svbony next generation Laser Collimator came with scope), aligned the Orion 6x30mm Correct-Image Rt. Angle (also included) to the OTA, From the reading I’ve been doing here I know I’ll will need some other “get started” started lens(es). I plan to go slowly and use basics, until I learn how to star hop, and figure out what other lenses I may or may not want.

Yes I bought a copy of Turn Left at Orion, and my copy of Nightwatch should be arriving shortly. Yes I’ve wadded through a gaggle of beginner threads!

I live in the hillside suburbs of Los Angeles (burbank) with Bortle c5 skies. I can get to 3 or 4 areas within an hour or two drive. I’m recently retired, and getting reacquainted with my old uneducated Astronomy hobby. I had a Celestron 4” Reflector on a clunky wooden tripod, back in the before smartphone/internet era of the 80-90’s, for a dozen or so years.
Now a couple of questions:
1) what will the 35mm DeepView lens be best for viewing?

2) Looks to me the Alpine Astronomical Baader Hyperion 8-24mm Mark IV Zoom Eyepiece (1.25"/2") with 2.25x Modular Barlow Lens, would give me a lot of quality/experimentation “bang for my buck” for the next year+/-. Is this correct thinking or is there a better way to go? Money and my agreeable wife are not big issues. I wear glasses and have Rt eye severe impairment.

3) I believe I need a moon filter, but I get a bit lost on all the conflicting & highly technical lens/filter discussions and varied views in the many filter/thread CN threads - suggestions based on my situation below would be great!

4) I want to view DSO, Planets, and things that go woosh in the night. I know I will need darker skies to be wowed, but I’m going to be mostly viewing locally, until I have enough knowledge, experience, and sky buddies to be fully addicted. What filters and or lenses would make my viewing more enjoyable/rewarding to star in the next year?

5) I’ve tried (not too hard) to connect with local Astronomy clubs, but have not had success in getting responses. Is there a good way to approach this? **** this virus!!!!

Thanks for being here, your wise offerings that I’ve already gleaned from CN, and offering any direct suggestions!

You are close to me. Your night sky is B8 to B9.
Travel NW to Mt Pinos to get B4 skies(B3 on the best nites).
You can view anything up there, but from your home, concentrate on:
Open star clusters
Globular star clusters
Double stars
Carbon stars
Moon
Planets
Variable stars
the brightest planetary nebulae

Save for darker skies:
Galaxies
Bright nebulae
Dark nebulae
Reflection nebulae
Telescopic comets
Most planetary nebulae

If you go up to Pinos, be sure to bring clothes for the arctic but check the snow conditions first. When the peak is closed due to snow, people go to the Chuchupate Ranger Station parking lot at the Frazier Mountain Campground Trailhead.
Feel free to send me a private message for more information about local sites.
Don

Edited by Starman1, 24 January 2022 - 12:02 AM.

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