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Best Accessories for Celestron 6se for Astrophotography

Astrophotography Celestron Equipment
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#1 To_The_Stars

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Posted 28 January 2022 - 03:07 PM

I just bought a Celestron 6se. So far I love it. Someday I would like to upgrade to the 8se but for now I have the 6se. I have the celestron 6.3 focal reducer and the celestron equitorial wedge as well as a Canon T5 camera. I am going to get my feet wet with astrophotography using this Celestron 6se. Does anyone have any recommendations for best "settings" or any tricks you've learned to get the best images through the 6se?

 

I would love to hear anything anyone's learned that I could try to apply.

 

Thanks,

To_The_Stars



#2 Mark Lovik

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Posted 28 January 2022 - 04:25 PM

With the Alt-Az mount I would suggest using EAA approaches to start your AP journey.  Look on the EAA forum.  You will find a large number of SCT users generating EAA images with systems similar to yours.

 

EAA often uses short exposures and live stacking to deal with the field rotation you get with your alt-az mount.  You will want exposures under about 20 seconds for this.   Live stacking will handle the rotation and assemble the sub-exposures on the fly.

 

- SharpCap and ASIAir are two common approaches for doing this

 

Many people stay with EAA - but it can be springboard into traditional AP.

 

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An alternative is to add a wedge to your system to polar align the mount.  Then you can start with more traditional AP approaches.

 

You will want a camera that matches your optics and reducer -- something like a 3.75 or 4-5'ish um pixel sized camera tends to work (ASI533 is an example 3.75 um pixel sized camera).  SCT to M42 adapter and a set of 42mm spacers will be needed for setting up the reducers backfocus and connect the camera to the SCT.


Edited by Mark Lovik, 28 January 2022 - 04:28 PM.


#3 To_The_Stars

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Posted 29 January 2022 - 02:28 AM

Mark, thank you for the reply. I do have a celestron equitoral wedge. So is the eaa approach necessary or can I cut right to more traditional AP?



#4 To_The_Stars

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Posted 29 January 2022 - 02:39 AM

Also, please bear with me here....I'm totally new to AP.   Is it typical in AP that people us a remote switch for taking the photos so that the steadiness of the image is not disturbed? As I mentioned before I have a Canon EOS T5...  

 

I looked up SharpCap like you mentioned. Looks like a great program. 



#5 DavidWasch

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Posted 29 January 2022 - 08:02 AM

Mark, thank you for the reply. I do have a celestron equitoral wedge. So is the eaa approach necessary or can I cut right to more traditional AP?

There's no specific cutoff between ap and eaa per se. AP will utilize more processing and/or longer exposures. With the 6se and alt/az mount you will be limited to shorter exposures, so eaa techniques will apply. Of course you're free to process the images to your heart's content-- many eaa observers do.

 

BTW, moving from a 6se to an 8se isn't really an 'upgrade' in ap. The 8se will have a narrower field of view and so will be optimal for smaller targets, it also will be more challenging to track accurately. Since it's the same quality optics and same focal ratio, it's not particularly 'better' than the 6se. Visually is a different story. Many on this forum would argue that a fast 80mm refractor costing half of the 8se ota would be more of an upgrade for ap.

 

 

Also, please bear with me here....I'm totally new to AP.   Is it typical in AP that people us a remote switch for taking the photos so that the steadiness of the image is not disturbed? As I mentioned before I have a Canon EOS T5...  

 

I looked up SharpCap like you mentioned. Looks like a great program. 

Yes, you would want to use a remote shutter release. For example, the ASIAir has a port dedicated to a shutter release cable.

 

-David


Edited by DavidWasch, 29 January 2022 - 08:09 AM.


#6 To_The_Stars

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Posted 30 January 2022 - 12:09 AM

David, 

 

Thanks for the reply.  Can you post links to the 80mm refractor scopes that you think are best?

 

Also, in my research of the 8se I understood it gathers 78% more light than the 6se, therefore making it that much better for AP. Also, I had learned that it "widens" the field of view because of the 8 inch aperature....but I'm still learning about this so please let me know as soon as you can what you think about these questions about the 8se.

Do you think it is not worth it for me to upgrade to an 8se. I was thinking of getting just the 8se optical tube and alternate between the 6se and 8se depending on what we want to do that night...using the same tripod and arm for both.   



#7 DavidWasch

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Posted 30 January 2022 - 08:50 PM

You are correct that the 8se gathers more light than the 6se, BUT the image produced by the telescope is spread over a larger area, so the light per pixel remains about the same. Here is a website that describes is better than I can: https://cloudbreakop...amount of time.

 

You would help yourself get the best equipment by reading more about AP before making a financial investment. Read through the entire 'Pixel by Pixel' blog-- it will give you a good sense of the many issues you'll have to deal with. It may seem overwhelming at first, but the more you understand things like flat frames, signal to noise and bayer matrices, the less frustration you'll experience in the long run, and the more quickly you'll develop skill.  

 

There are a number of great 70-80mm refractors to choose from. Conider SkyWatcher, Astrotech, Orion, Explore Scientific, just to name a few. Just search under 'Best 80mm' in this forum, and you are sure to have a lot of good information at your finger tips.



#8 Jared

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Posted 30 January 2022 - 08:57 PM

Moved to Beginning Deep Sky Imaging for a better fit.




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