Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Observatory, on your roof?

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
6 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----
  • topic starter

Posted 24 May 2004 - 10:39 AM

I saw your observatory built into your roof jrcrilly, looks cool. How do you prevent any vibrations being passed into your 14". Have been thinking I have some really good attic space, just need a hole :crazy:. How does your house get in the way or does it not bother you much.
Has anyone else built an observatory like this. I think it is nice to have a space to work around the scope rather than put it in a remote observatory. Would people recomend the roof or building a seperate structure in the garden. I like the idea of a dome but think this would be quite expensive. Going to have a good look round the attic and garden to see what i might plan :idea:. this could push me back towards the 14" meade :grin:

#2 matt

matt

    Vendor (Scopemania)

  • *****
  • Posts: 10991
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2003

Posted 24 May 2004 - 02:49 PM

I built an observatory with my father about ten years ago. Retrospectively, my ideas about this include:
1- it's much easier and "scalable" (not to mention that there will be nothing wrong about it if ever you sell your house later) to have a garden shed and roll out your scope every night. You can use the shed to store other stuff, or to have your table with your pc and/or atlas, etc... It works if 1.1 - your scope can be rolled out (you will need a "runway" between the shed and your obsering platform. and 1.2. - if light pollution and weather (cold and wind mostly) are mild enough to observe from outside.

2- second-best is the roll-off system. I grew claustrophobic of the tiny slit of our observatory's dome. Not to mention nothing bigger than a C8 can be used in it...

3- if you have a pier to hold your mount, whatever you do, try having the concrete pier set in the ground independently from the foundations of the building.

#3 bierbelly

bierbelly

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11544
  • Joined: 23 Jan 2004

Posted 24 May 2004 - 03:18 PM

If you install an observatory in the roof of your house, you will be dealing constantly with heat currents coming off the roof. JrCrilly, if I recall correctly, has made at least an attempt to thermally isolate his observatory from the rest of the house, but he'll still have problems if he's looking over the roof at something...but don't we all anyway? It's just that if you remove the observatory from the house, the amount of angular distortion (I don't know how to properly describe this) caused by the roof is smaller.

#4 jrcrilly

jrcrilly

    Refractor wienie no more

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 35422
  • Joined: 30 Apr 2003

Posted 24 May 2004 - 03:19 PM

I saw your observatory built into your roof jrcrilly, looks cool. How do you prevent any vibrations being passed into your 14". Have been thinking I have some really good attic space, just need a hole :crazy:. How does your house get in the way or does it not bother you much.


The 14" Meade is an excellent observatory instrument. I isolate the telescope from the floor of the observatory by mounting it to a concrete-filled 24" pier that extends through a hole to the ground beneath; in a residence this might not work because of other uses for the area below. I've seen one similar to mine that was installed in a residence; in that one there were additional beams installed below floor level from supporting walls. The structure, including the beams, was isolated from direct connection with the floor, but there is still a possibility of vibration being transmitted from the floor through the walls to the subfloor beams. I never got to look through that scope so I don't know how well it worked out.

I have some heat effects from the building roof which would be avoided with a conventional rolloff shed far from other buildings - but I don't have an area like that available here.

#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----
  • topic starter

Posted 25 May 2004 - 04:54 AM

I really think it would be rather wierd having a huge concrete pillar going the whole way through my house lol
I could support it off the stone walls that are built into the bedrock and i think there would be very little if any vibrations transmitted through that but it is a bit expensive as an experiment. I could always build an observatory in a kind of small lighthouse style. The main problem is surrounding obstacles. The roof would get it above everything. My garage would be good but in the SW there is the gable of my house.
I guess this might be one for the drawing board. Will think long and hard about it.
Still if anyone has ideas id be glad to hear them. And thanks all who have alreaddy replied.

#6 John Hoare

John Hoare

    I is who I is

  • *****
  • Posts: 10761
  • Joined: 25 Apr 2004

Posted 27 May 2004 - 01:06 AM

Sounds perfectly sensible to an old sailor! The tabernacle for a heavy mast usually rests on the keel.

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----
  • topic starter

Posted 27 May 2004 - 08:11 AM

would be useful if i wanted to sail my house anywhere!!!!
(monty python springs to mind!)


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics