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What Book(s) did You Acquire Recently

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#2126 turtle86

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Posted 16 April 2024 - 09:34 AM

Sorry to hear that.  Amazon sure has come down on their shipping quality.  I just received 4 books from BookOutlet.  They sell new books that were overstocked at bookstores.  The box was large, heavy shrink-wrapped and heavy cardboard - and shipping was free.

 

One of those 4 books was Jim Bell's The Art of the Cosmos and I got it for $12.

Totally agree about Amazon.

 

Thanks for the BookOutlet link.

 

Another good source is www.hamiltonbook.com

 

They usually have a good selection of astronomy and cosmology books.  A number of years ago they even had some of the O'Meara books.


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#2127 Xilman

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Posted 17 April 2024 - 09:10 AM

At the recent BAA Winchester Weekend, the bring and buy stall had many things, including books, magazines, etc --- some of them contributed by me and many of them free. Consequently I picked up both volumes of Uranometria 2000.0 and the associated Deep Sky Field Guide for £25, as well as a copy of RNGC and several old books dating as far back as 1879. Total cost £45, which is an absolute bargain. Just one volume of U2000.0 is £80 on amazon.co.uk


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#2128 BrentKnight

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Posted 17 April 2024 - 12:20 PM

At the recent BAA Winchester Weekend, the bring and buy stall had many things, including books, magazines, etc --- some of them contributed by me and many of them free. Consequently I picked up both volumes of Uranometria 2000.0 and the associated Deep Sky Field Guide for £25, as well as a copy of RNGC and several old books dating as far back as 1879. Total cost £45, which is an absolute bargain. Just one volume of U2000.0 is £80 on amazon.co.uk

The UK used book market seems to have a much better selection of older books than we can find here in the states.  I often see good prices for books that I'd like to have, but shipping across the pond brings the price up $30 to $70.


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#2129 Xilman

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Posted 18 April 2024 - 05:48 AM

The UK used book market seems to have a much better selection of older books than we can find here in the states.  I often see good prices for books that I'd like to have, but shipping across the pond brings the price up $30 to $70.

And vice versa, as I have found out recently. One book I wanted to buy was unavailable on amazon.co.uk. The price from amazon.com was quite reasonable but shipping would cost £30 for a £25 book. I eventually bought it from amazon.es where shipping was only €8 on a €30 book.
 

On several occasions I have bought books for people visiting the UK so they can carry them "for free" on their return flight. Once an American did the same for me when I visited the US. Likewise, the author of the €30 book offered to bring a copy with her when she visited family this summer and then post it from where she was staying in Scotland to where I live in Cambridge, a much cheaper approach.

 

It seems to me that CN and SGL could (and should) each set up a sub-forum specifically to co-ordinate this activity for their members mutual benefit.



#2130 cliff mygatt

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Posted 19 April 2024 - 08:39 AM

I just received a copy of the Atlas of the Andromeda Galaxy by Paul Hodge.  Good condition and looking forward to exploring it more.


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#2131 Alex_V

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Posted 19 April 2024 - 09:40 AM

I just received a copy of the Atlas of the Andromeda Galaxy by Paul Hodge.  Good condition and looking forward to exploring it more.

Congrats!

It's still on my wish list. Where did you got it?


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#2132 Alex65

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Posted 19 April 2024 - 10:36 AM

I have seen plenty of recommendations for this book, so I bought a copy the other day to check it out. 

 

It is The Light - Hearted Astronomer (1984) by Ken Fulton. 

 

IMG_8350.JPG

 

It is quite a short book (just over 100 pages) but I have enjoyed reading it so far as I make my leisurely way down the Aesthetic Path (though, it must be said, I've already been in the 'Jungle' for many a year so far!). I may not totally agree with Ken Fulton's choice of a 4" refractor as the best telescope (however, as I'm walking along the Aesthetic Path I do echo, and totally agree with, his statement that a Dob is probably the best for us Aesthetic guys!) but there is plenty of good advice in the book nevertheless, and plenty of humor too. I actually enjoy this vintage, and nostalgic, book and it takes me back to the 1980s and the amateur astronomy scene of the era. 

 

Can't wait to finish this book and afterwards I'm going to track down a copy of The Light - Hearted Astronomer Observes Again.


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#2133 Xilman

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Posted 19 April 2024 - 11:39 AM

Congrats!

It's still on my wish list. Where did you got it?

Seconded.



#2134 BrentKnight

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Posted 19 April 2024 - 12:04 PM

I just received a copy of the Atlas of the Andromeda Galaxy by Paul Hodge.  Good condition and looking forward to exploring it more.

I use this "book" all the time.  So many of the mapped-out features are seen with my EAA rigs and I enjoy hunting them down in my captures.  But I've never had much desire to get the paper version since the electronic version is just so usable.  I fear if I were to grab a copy it would just sit on a shelf (and even at $100 that's a lot).

 

I'm sure it's a beautiful book though Cliff, and I'm happy that you found a copy!



#2135 faackanders2

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Posted 20 April 2024 - 07:13 PM

I had to laugh at that one. $4800 for the book plus $14.50 for shipping.  (Clearly not enough to qualify for free shipping).lol.gif 
 

I actually use Abe a lot, so this is no knock on them. 
 

I did scroll down and see that they would expect you to pay for insurance, certainly understandable. The rate was $.05 per $100, which works out to about $25 for $4800. That seems remarkably low. I would certainly insist on some pretty good packaging, not a simple tyvek bag!

 

Come to think of it, I would like this book……

Definitely require insurance since you wouldn't pay if you didn't receive book.



#2136 faackanders2

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Posted 20 April 2024 - 07:22 PM

Some years ago I purchased the 1st and 2nd volumes of the Uranometria 2000.0. Some time later I thought it'd be nice to have the 3rd volume - the Deep Sky Field Guide.

Unfortunately my volumes 1 and 2 are first editions and the field guide I purchased is a second edition. That didn't work very well at all. I stuck it on the shelf and didn't touch it again - it was just too aggravating. 

Today I received a copy of volume 3 first edition Deep Sky Field Guide.

 

attachicon.gif Screenshot 2024-04-01 145742.jpg

 

It is so nice to be able to move back and forth between the atlas and the field guide and have everything "line up".

 

Since I don't have the second edition copies of the atlases, I'll probably be listing this second edition volume 3 in the classifieds at some point.

 

attachicon.gif Screenshot 2024-04-01 150200.jpg

How different could the two editions be?



#2137 Mike McShan

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Posted 20 April 2024 - 07:51 PM

I have seen plenty of recommendations for this book, so I bought a copy the other day to check it out. 

 

It is The Light - Hearted Astronomer (1984) by Ken Fulton. 

 

attachicon.gif IMG_8350.JPG

 

It is quite a short book (just over 100 pages) but I have enjoyed reading it so far as I make my leisurely way down the Aesthetic Path (though, it must be said, I've already been in the 'Jungle' for many a year so far!). I may not totally agree with Ken Fulton's choice of a 4" refractor as the best telescope (however, as I'm walking along the Aesthetic Path I do echo, and totally agree with, his statement that a Dob is probably the best for us Aesthetic guys!) but there is plenty of good advice in the book nevertheless, and plenty of humor too. I actually enjoy this vintage, and nostalgic, book and it takes me back to the 1980s and the amateur astronomy scene of the era. 

 

Can't wait to finish this book and afterwards I'm going to track down a copy of The Light - Hearted Astronomer Observes Again.

I found the "Light-Hearted Astronomer Observes Again" a bit disappointing. It is largely a reprint of the first book with the addition of a religious tract.


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#2138 kksmith

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Posted 20 April 2024 - 11:36 PM

This morning, in the mail: The Light-Hearted Astronomer. Want to devour it right now, but saving it for a plane flight at the end of the month. 

 

Then I cheated and read the first 5 chapters. 


Edited by kksmith, 20 April 2024 - 11:39 PM.

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#2139 Winston6079

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Posted 22 April 2024 - 06:47 AM

Star Theatre: The Story of the Planetarium by William Firebrace

 

I am reading this book (borrowed from a library) and all I can say is that this is a rather tough book to read, after reading the long first chapter. Not saying it bad, the author is not an astronomer but an architect from London... he quotes many literature, drama or what, his style of writing is very diffident to any astronomical books which I have read before. No one mention the book so I write something here.

I haven't been online for several months. I finally finished reading this book recently. As a non-native English speaker, I found this book a bit difficult to read, especially since the author frequently quotes literary and operatic works.

 

The author is a London architect. His perspective on viewing planetariums certainly tends to be that of an architect: analyzing the architectural styles of different planetariums, rather than that of an astronomer (or educator). The story of the Moscow Planetarium is very interesting: the domes of mosques in Soviet-dominated Central Asia actually inspired young architects to create domes that were different from the Jena Planetarium (although some building materials and projectors were still imported from Germany) .

 

The story of Soviet photographer Alexander Rodchinko’s visit to the Moscow Planetarium is also interesting. The author (as an architect) is certainly familiar with recent art movements. If the author were an astronomer, he would probably overlook these interesting details.

 

The section for Griffith Observatory is also exciting. In addition to introducing the history of the observatory, it also mentioned several influential movies: all related to this observatory (and planetarium).

 

But the author makes too many references to opera and literature, both English and non-English, some of which are not directly related to the planetarium introduced. Somewhat lengthy. Maybe it would be better to lump this all into one chapter.

 

The author prefers live theater-style performances, with an instructor explaining the constellations (with musical accompaniment), rather than the "pre-recorded" movies popular in contemporary planetariums. Maybe he will like Japan: it is known as the kingdom of planetariums, with more than 400 planetariums scattered across the country. Live explanations are still popular there, and the lecturers have all passed professional qualifications. However, the author seems more familiar with planetariums in India (operated by religious groups). The content about the Japanese planetarium only takes up a small paragraph.

 

Am I saying this book is bad? No, if you like architecture and literature, you might like this book. The book makes some points (particularly about the impact of planetariums on contemporary art) that are rarely seen in astronomy books. In a way, this book is unique. The author also does not avoid sensitive historical issues: the relationship between the inventor of the Zeiss star projector and the Nazi regime, and the Nazi regime's persecution of German planetariums. The author does not avoid sensitive historical issues.

 

TLDR: A book that seems to be about astronomy but actually has a deeper relationship with architecture, art, literature, and history.


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#2140 Daniel Mounsey

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Posted 22 April 2024 - 06:58 AM

I have seen plenty of recommendations for this book, so I bought a copy the other day to check it out. 

 

It is The Light - Hearted Astronomer (1984) by Ken Fulton. 

 

attachicon.gif IMG_8350.JPG

 

It is quite a short book (just over 100 pages) but I have enjoyed reading it so far as I make my leisurely way down the Aesthetic Path (though, it must be said, I've already been in the 'Jungle' for many a year so far!). I may not totally agree with Ken Fulton's choice of a 4" refractor as the best telescope (however, as I'm walking along the Aesthetic Path I do echo, and totally agree with, his statement that a Dob is probably the best for us Aesthetic guys!) but there is plenty of good advice in the book nevertheless, and plenty of humor too. I actually enjoy this vintage, and nostalgic, book and it takes me back to the 1980s and the amateur astronomy scene of the era. 

 

Can't wait to finish this book and afterwards I'm going to track down a copy of The Light - Hearted Astronomer Observes Again.

 

When I started out in the early 90's this book really inspired me. I actually read it twice. 


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#2141 cliff mygatt

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Posted 22 April 2024 - 11:54 AM

I was about to put an add on Astromart but before I did, I checked out EBay and there is was the Atlas of the Andromeda Galaxy.


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#2142 Winston6079

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Posted 24 April 2024 - 01:31 AM

Just got a Simplified Chinese version of Sky Atlas 2000 published by the Beijing Planetarium in early 2000s. I have no idea if that was authorised by the author.

In the introduction it says:

“For internal (academic) exchange purposes, please do not reprint or reproduce.”

Original price? 35 RMB, roughly $5 only. The paper quality is poor.
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#2143 wrvond

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Posted 24 April 2024 - 04:32 AM

How different could the two editions be?

The Guide is arranged by chart number. For example, if I am looking at chart #99 in Volume 1, I open the Guide and look for the number 99 in bold.

 

Screenshot 2024-04-24 050656.jpg

 

As you can see, chart #99 spans 6h16m to 7h4by +27° to +40°

The very first Galaxy listed for Chart 99 in the Guide is located at 2h41by +7° 11' 13"

 

If I pick a galaxy from Chart 99 such as U3475 in Auriga (upper right hand corner) and go to the Combined Non-Stellar Index of the Guide Vol. 3 Second Edition I find UGC3475 listed as GX58. Flipping to the pages in the Guide that correspond to Chart 58 (in Uranometria 2000.0 Vol. 1 Second Edition) I find that UGC3475 is a magnitude 14.6 Sm Class dwarf spiral, very low surface brightness; mag 11.8 star on N. edge.

 

So the information displayed on Chart 99 in Volume 1 First Ed. is found under Chart 58 in the Second Ed. Guide. 

 

I'd say that's a significant difference.


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#2144 BrentKnight

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Posted 28 April 2024 - 09:17 AM

My most recent acquisition was a copy of Isaac Roberts Atlas of 52 Regions: A Guide to William Herschel's Fields of Nebulosity and it's Supplement published by Isaac's wife in 1929.

 

I started a separate topic on it over here.


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#2145 BrentKnight

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Posted 28 April 2024 - 09:32 AM

The Guide is arranged by chart number. For example, if I am looking at chart #99 in Volume 1, I open the Guide and look for the number 99 in bold.

 

attachicon.gif Screenshot 2024-04-24 050656.jpg

 

As you can see, chart #99 spans 6h16m to 7h4by +27° to +40°

The very first Galaxy listed for Chart 99 in the Guide is located at 2h41by +7° 11' 13"

 

If I pick a galaxy from Chart 99 such as U3475 in Auriga (upper right hand corner) and go to the Combined Non-Stellar Index of the Guide Vol. 3 Second Edition I find UGC3475 listed as GX58. Flipping to the pages in the Guide that correspond to Chart 58 (in Uranometria 2000.0 Vol. 1 Second Edition) I find that UGC3475 is a magnitude 14.6 Sm Class dwarf spiral, very low surface brightness; mag 11.8 star on N. edge.

 

So the information displayed on Chart 99 in Volume 1 First Ed. is found under Chart 58 in the Second Ed. Guide. 

 

I'd say that's a significant difference.

A big difference between the 1st and 2nd edition of Uranometria 2000.0 is the way the charts are presented in the atlas.  In the 2nd edition, the left hand chart in the book matches up with the right hand chart in the book creating a continuous spread (with some overlap in the gutter).  In the 1st edition, the charts are opposite.  If you were to pull the charts out of the book, it wouldn't matter.  But if you want to view them bound, then the left edge of the left chart matches up with the right edge of the right chart.  Someone really messed this up in editing...

 

U2000.0 Chart Layout

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#2146 Xilman

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Posted 30 April 2024 - 03:44 AM

I have just finished Between The Planets, 2nd Ed, by Fletcher G. Watson, another one acquired for free from the bring & buy stall. The subject matter covers asteroids, comets, meteoroids, meteors and interplanetary dust.

 

It's absolutely magnificent, despite being published in 1956 (the first edition was published in 1941), written in an extremely readable style with plenty of technical detail  but still well comprehensible to a non-professional reader. I learned quite a bit, despite the material being so old.

 

I wish that one of comparable clarity and covering the same subjects were published these days. Of course, it would have to describe our current knowledge rather than that of 80 years ago.


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#2147 Xilman

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Posted 30 April 2024 - 03:47 AM

The Guide is arranged by chart number. For example, if I am looking at chart #99 in Volume 1, I open the Guide and look for the number 99 in bold.

 

attachicon.gif Screenshot 2024-04-24 050656.jpg

 

As you can see, chart #99 spans 6h16m to 7h4by +27° to +40°

The very first Galaxy listed for Chart 99 in the Guide is located at 2h41by +7° 11' 13"

 

If I pick a galaxy from Chart 99 such as U3475 in Auriga (upper right hand corner) and go to the Combined Non-Stellar Index of the Guide Vol. 3 Second Edition I find UGC3475 listed as GX58. Flipping to the pages in the Guide that correspond to Chart 58 (in Uranometria 2000.0 Vol. 1 Second Edition) I find that UGC3475 is a magnitude 14.6 Sm Class dwarf spiral, very low surface brightness; mag 11.8 star on N. edge.

 

So the information displayed on Chart 99 in Volume 1 First Ed. is found under Chart 58 in the Second Ed. Guide. 

 

I'd say that's a significant difference.

I'm fortunate in that the Guide matches up with the Atlases I own. Thanks for letting me know, as I would never have thought of checking otherwise.


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#2148 Gurney

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Posted 30 April 2024 - 06:06 AM

I recently bought a couple of books from Charles Bracken and enjoyed them very much (I don't know if they've been shown in this thread as I did not read the full 86 pages ... yet):

 

1) Deep Sky Imaging Primer

Great overview of everything DSO astrophotography from sensor technology to post-processing. Quite condensed but everything is here and easily digestible.

images.jpg

 

2) The Astrophotography Planner

I love this book. It's a list of the best DSO objects, mapped by luminosity and with their visibility calculated along the months of the year (incl. moon %). The author also includes imaging tips for each object. The author can even customize the book to your exact latitude and timezon as a PDF.

ap-planner-cover-2e-front-only-50pct.jpg

 

Both can be bought directly from the author here (I have no affiliation or connection to the author, I just like his books)


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#2149 BrentKnight

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Posted 30 April 2024 - 10:20 AM

Gurney...

 

What do you think of The Astrophotography Planner?

 

I have the Primer and also have The Astrophotography Sky Atlas and The Visible Universe.  Both of those I highly recommend.



#2150 Gurney

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Posted 30 April 2024 - 10:38 AM

Gurney...

 

What do you think of The Astrophotography Planner?

 

I have the Primer and also have The Astrophotography Sky Atlas and The Visible Universe.  Both of those I highly recommend.

I like it a lot. I like the fact that sky maps are fully dedicated to astro-photographers, highlighting what we care about (the his sky atlas that you know already). I also like the short text that usually give good tips (obviously you'll find much more info about acquisition tactics on CN or other forums but I think that helps). But for me, the most interesting part of the book comes from the customization. I printed the PDF and bound it and find it very easy to refer too.

 

You can live without (I still use Observer Pro to plan ahead as it includes custom horizon features and other visibility/contrast variables that help  you choose more carefully) but it's a purchase I don't regret.

 

Here is an sample page for the North American Nebula. All pages are similar (bar a couple of pages at the beginning of the book showing the variation of obversing hours/moon % along the year and a summary table of when each DSO object is visible). I guess the author would be ok with me showing this here as he also shows example on his website (but a generic one, not a custom one).

Astro Planner.png

 

For me, the best book would have been an Astroplanner type of book with a few pictures from the Visible Universe for each target (at different typical FoVs).


Edited by Gurney, 30 April 2024 - 10:40 AM.

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