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What Book(s) did You Acquire Recently

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#2201 CarolinaBanker

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Posted 23 May 2024 - 02:47 PM

I just received in the mail today Uranometria 2000.0, the three volume set including the Field Guide which is seemingly relatively uncommon. I am very excited to start planning some sessions.

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#2202 BrentKnight

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Posted 23 May 2024 - 02:53 PM

I just received in the mail today Uranometria 2000.0, the three volume set including the Field Guide which is seemingly relatively uncommon. I am very excited to start planning some sessions.

I have both the first edition like yours and later I got the single volume second edition (with the field guide).  I'll never get rid of my first edition (even though I rarely use it).


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#2203 turtle86

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Posted 23 May 2024 - 04:35 PM

I have both the first edition like yours and later I got the single volume second edition (with the field guide).  I'll never get rid of my first edition (even though I rarely use it).

 

I have both editions myself.  The second edition definitely gets a lot more use but like you I'll never get rid of the first edition.


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#2204 herschelobjects

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Posted 23 May 2024 - 10:26 PM

Won’t be getting rid of my first edition, either. Personally, I find the first edition is much easier to use in the dark for star hopping, as even the faintest stars are easy to see on the page in low light conditions. Can’t say the same for the All Sky Edition. Also, I have been yellow highlighting my observations in the first edition for over 30 years. Although virtually none of my IC or anonymous galaxy observations are indicated (because, unlike the All Sky Edition, they are not plotted), there are still thousands of objects highlighted and it is a real testament to my personal exploration of the universe. In my dotage, the heavily taped and pounded first edition will sit in my lap when I’m wheeled into the day room at the old folks’ home, where I will flip the pages and silently, happily reminisce...

 

 

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#2205 Gurney

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Posted Yesterday, 01:57 AM

Hi,

 

I could not read the full 89 pages of this thread so I apologies in advance if this book has been showcased here before.

 

I recently bought Luna Cognita, by Robert A. Garfinkle.

IMG_2576.jpg

 

 

It's a MASSIVE 3-volumes book combining virtually everything about the Moon. Thorough historical representation (from ancient mythologies from different regions to recent popular culture), detailed astronomy history, feature description (inc. historical context of their discivery) .... and way more. Basically everything you could remember about the moon.

 

Obviously not a book to read cover to cover :-) but I will have fun reading through it and learning more about the little known history of crater X or ridge Y

 

Volume 1: Generalities (well, this word does not make this volume justice as each chapter in this volume could be an small book/essay of its own)

IMG_2577.jpg

Volume 2: Feature description ( the author describes each moon feature, day by day as they are being discovered by the lunation cycle)

IMG_2578.jpg

Volume 3: Appendices and references


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#2206 desertstars

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Posted Yesterday, 09:15 AM

 

I could not read the full 89 pages of this thread so I apologies in advance if this book has been showcased here before.

No apology necessary. It's a work worthy of repeated mention, and there are sure to be new people on the forum with lunar interests who haven't yet heard of it.


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#2207 turtle86

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Posted Yesterday, 12:49 PM

Hi,

 

I could not read the full 89 pages of this thread so I apologies in advance if this book has been showcased here before.

 

I recently bought Luna Cognita, by Robert A. Garfinkle.

attachicon.gif IMG_2576.jpg

 

 

It's a MASSIVE 3-volumes book combining virtually everything about the Moon. Thorough historical representation (from ancient mythologies from different regions to recent popular culture), detailed astronomy history, feature description (inc. historical context of their discivery) .... and way more. Basically everything you could remember about the moon.

 

Obviously not a book to read cover to cover :-) but I will have fun reading through it and learning more about the little known history of crater X or ridge Y

 

Volume 1: Generalities (well, this word does not make this volume justice as each chapter in this volume could be an small book/essay of its own)

attachicon.gif IMG_2577.jpg

Volume 2: Feature description ( the author describes each moon feature, day by day as they are being discovered by the lunation cycle)

attachicon.gif IMG_2578.jpg

Volume 3: Appendices and references

 

It's superb!  That and the Modern Moon are my two favorites.



#2208 AstronomyFred

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Posted Yesterday, 01:17 PM

Luna Cognita is fantastic, you sure have lots of reading fun ahead of you!



#2209 BrentKnight

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Posted Yesterday, 02:17 PM

Moderator Note:

 

I've started compiling a spreadsheet of all the books folks have mentioned in this topic.  I added the link to the first post made by Alex way back in March 2022.  I'll update when I get the time...


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#2210 Mike Swan

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Posted Yesterday, 03:13 PM

[Some while ago I found a complete set of the Hipparcos/Tycho catalogue on sale for £250. All 17 volumes, including V17 which holds the CD ASCII dataa

 

Vv 14-16 comprise the MSA. The market price of the version pictured above was then £600, so I considered I got a bargain.

 

It does get used moderately often.]

 

 

 

The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues was published in 1997 by the ESA Publications Division in The Netherlands, and as far as I know only available from there. It featured in an article in the July 1997 edition of Sky & Telescope (pages 28 to 34). The original cost was either 650 Dfl or US$ 400 (that included postage and packing). Equivalent to about £300 to £350 sterling at the time (about the same in IR Punts for me).

 

I got my set direct from the ESA in The Netherlands in 1997. I obviously still use the three volumes of the MSA today, and occasionally the main Hipparcos Catalogues themselves when I need to resolve any issue.

 

I did use the Catalogues (including the double and variable volumes) when I compiled the Webb Star Atlas – published by the Webb Deep-Sky Society in the early 2000’s. I believe copies are still available from them – www.webbdeepsky.com

 

The Atlas itself has a limiting magnitude of 7.10, to match the limit of the Yale Bright Star Catalogue and Supplement, but using Hipparcos data. You would think that I would only need to use Hipparcos stars but I had to use a few Tycho ones (from the CD in volume 17) when I discovered that some stars were missing near very bright Hip stars.

 

I’ve been working, on and off, on a second edition – that has a 7.50 mag limit - for a number of years, but other projects always seem to get in the way!

 

 

 

 

 

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#2211 turtle86

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Posted Today, 01:41 AM

[Some while ago I found a complete set of the Hipparcos/Tycho catalogue on sale for £250. All 17 volumes, including V17 which holds the CD ASCII dataa

 

Vv 14-16 comprise the MSA. The market price of the version pictured above was then £600, so I considered I got a bargain.

 

It does get used moderately often.]

 

 

 

The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues was published in 1997 by the ESA Publications Division in The Netherlands, and as far as I know only available from there. It featured in an article in the July 1997 edition of Sky & Telescope (pages 28 to 34). The original cost was either 650 Dfl or US$ 400 (that included postage and packing). Equivalent to about £300 to £350 sterling at the time (about the same in IR Punts for me).

 

I got my set direct from the ESA in The Netherlands in 1997. I obviously still use the three volumes of the MSA today, and occasionally the main Hipparcos Catalogues themselves when I need to resolve any issue.

 

I did use the Catalogues (including the double and variable volumes) when I compiled the Webb Star Atlas – published by the Webb Deep-Sky Society in the early 2000’s. I believe copies are still available from them – www.webbdeepsky.com

 

The Atlas itself has a limiting magnitude of 7.10, to match the limit of the Yale Bright Star Catalogue and Supplement, but using Hipparcos data. You would think that I would only need to use Hipparcos stars but I had to use a few Tycho ones (from the CD in volume 17) when I discovered that some stars were missing near very bright Hip stars.

 

I’ve been working, on and off, on a second edition – that has a 7.50 mag limit - for a number of years, but other projects always seem to get in the way!

 

About five or six years ago someone who had to move and downsize was selling this set for maybe $200-300.  If I didn't already have the standalone set of the MSA at the time I would've bid on it.


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