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EAA Monthly Observing Challenge - May 2022

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#1 Alien Observatory

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Posted 30 April 2022 - 10:29 PM

EAA Monthly Observing Challenge - May 2022, I will be posting Stellina images as I capture them this month...  Pat Utah smile.gif

 

Easy: M5, M57, M82

 

M5 was discovered by Gottfried Kirch and his wife Maria Margarethe in 1702. William Herschel resolved individual stars in the cluster in 1791, he counted 200 of them with his 40-foot reflector.

 

M57 is the famous Ring Nebula. These objects are the remains of sunlike stars which have blown away their outer envelopes, leaving planet-sized white dwarfs at their centers.

 

M82 is a remarkable, peculiar galaxy in Ursa Major. M 82 was discovered along with its partner M 81 by Johann Bode, and both galaxies are sometimes known as Bode's Nebulae.  Also called the Cigar Galaxy, M 82 has been spectacularly disturbed by a relatively recent encounter with M 81, and displays conspicuous dust lanes and heavy star formation.  M 82 is the prototype irregular starburst disk galaxy.

 

 

 

Medium: M83, NGC 40, NGC5466

 

M83 is one of the closest and brightest spiral galaxies in the sky, and sometimes called the "Southern Pinwheel”.   Messier 83 was discovered by Nicholas Louis de Lacaille at the Cape of Good Hope in 1752.  M 83 is one of the showpieces of the southern sky, but difficult for mid-northern observers to view due to its southern declination.

 

NGC 40 was discovered by William Herschel on November 25th, 1788.  NGC 40 is about 3,500 light years away, and about one light-year across.  About 30,000 years from now, NGC 40 will fade away, leaving only a white dwarf star approximately the size of Earth.

 

NGC 5466 was discovered by William Herschel on May 17, 1784.  Located 51,800 light years from Earth and 52,800 light years from the Galactic center, this globular cluster is unusual. Its spectral distribution of stars contains a blue horizontal branch, and is usually metal poor.  As NGC 6544 orbits the center of the Milky Way, it is slowly losing stars due to the effect of tides at perigalacticon and galactic disc crossings, having lost 60% of its mass loss over the course of its evolution.    

 

 

 

Hard: Comet 19P/ Borrelly,  Ste 1,  NGC 7023

 

Comet Borrelly or Borrelly's Comet (officially 19P/Borrelly) is a periodic comet which was visited by the spacecraft Deep Space 1 in 2001.  The comet was discovered by Alphonse Borrelly at Marseilles, France on December 28, 1904.  The comet was widely observed during January 1905.  Orbital investigations have indicated the comet was placed into its discovery orbit by a series of moderate close approaches to Jupiter during the 19th century, namely in 1817, 1853, and 1889.

 

Stephenson 1 is an  Open Cluster appearing in the constellation Lyra.  It is 1272 light years from our solar system.  Stephenson 1's apparent size is approximately 20.0 arcminutes, corresponding to a physical diameter of 7 light years.

 

NGC 7023 is an example of an open star cluster associated with a reflection nebula.  NGC 7023 lies in a region of the Milky Way darkened by dust, within which the nebula is embedded.  NGC 7023 is about 6 light-years across, and 1,300 light-years away.  Within the Iris, dusty nebular material surrounds a massive, hot, young star in its formative years.

 

 

 

Challange: (10) Hygiea

 

Astroid Hygiea (10) is the fourth-biggest asteroid in the main belt, and is named after the Greek goddess of health.  It is estimated to contain 2.9% of the total mass of the entire asteroid belt, and was discovered by the Italian astronomer Annibale de Gasparis on April 12, 1849.   Hygiea is also the most oblate of the largest asteroids, with estimated dimensions of 530 x 407 x 370 km.   Visual Mag 9.5, 0.3 arcsec.  It may be possible to capture with a long exposure image of the star field and look for a small streak as it moves within the star field.


Edited by Alien Observatory, 30 April 2022 - 11:53 PM.

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#2 Bob Campbell

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Posted 30 April 2022 - 11:54 PM

EAA Monthly Observing Challenge - May 2022, I will be posting Stellina images as I capture them this month...  Pat Utah smile.gif

 

Easy: M5, M57, M82

 

M5 was discovered by Gottfried Kirch and his wife Maria Margarethe in 1702. William Herschel resolved individual stars in the cluster in 1791, he counted 200 of them with his 40-foot reflector.

 

M57 is the famous Ring Nebula. These objects are the remains of sunlike stars which have blown away their outer envelopes, leaving planet-sized white dwarfs at their centers.

 

M82 is a remarkable, peculiar galaxy in Ursa Major. M 82 was discovered along with its partner M 81 by Johann Bode, and both galaxies are sometimes known as Bode's Nebulae.  Also called the Cigar Galaxy, M 82 has been spectacularly disturbed by a relatively recent encounter with M 81, and displays conspicuous dust lanes and heavy star formation.  M 82 is the prototype irregular starburst disk galaxy.

 

 

 

Medium: M83, NGC 40, NGC5466

 

M83 is one of the closest and brightest spiral galaxies in the sky, and sometimes called the "Southern Pinwheel”.   Messier 83 was discovered by Nicholas Louis de Lacaille at the Cape of Good Hope in 1752.  M 83 is one of the showpieces of the southern sky, but difficult for mid-northern observers to view due to its southern declination.

 

NGC 40 was discovered by William Herschel on November 25th, 1788.  NGC 40 is about 3,500 light years away, and about one light-year across.  About 30,000 years from now, NGC 40 will fade away, leaving only a white dwarf star approximately the size of Earth.

 

NGC 5466 was discovered by William Herschel on May 17, 1784.  Located 51,800 light years from Earth and 52,800 light years from the Galactic center, this globular cluster is unusual. Its spectral distribution of stars contains a blue horizontal branch, and is usually metal poor.  As NGC 6544 orbits the center of the Milky Way, it is slowly losing stars due to the effect of tides at perigalacticon and galactic disc crossings, having lost 60% of its mass loss over the course of its evolution.    

 

 

 

Hard: Comet 19P/ Borrelly,  Ste 1,  NGC 7023

 

Comet Borrelly or Borrelly's Comet (officially 19P/Borrelly) is a periodic comet which was visited by the spacecraft Deep Space 1 in 2001.  The comet was discovered by Alphonse Borrelly at Marseilles, France on December 28, 1904.  The comet was widely observed during January 1905.  Orbital investigations have indicated the comet was placed into its discovery orbit by a series of moderate close approaches to Jupiter during the 19th century, namely in 1817, 1853, and 1889.

 

Stephenson 1 is an  Open Cluster appearing in the constellation Lyra.  It is 1272 light years from our solar system.  Stephenson 1's apparent size is approximately 20.0 arcminutes, corresponding to a physical diameter of 7 light years.

 

NGC 7023 is an example of an open star cluster associated with a reflection nebula.  NGC 7023 lies in a region of the Milky Way darkened by dust, within which the nebula is embedded.  NGC 7023 is about 6 light-years across, and 1,300 light-years away.  Within the Iris, dusty nebular material surrounds a massive, hot, young star in its formative years.

 

 

 

Challange: (10) Hygiea

 

Astroid Hygiea (10) is the fourth-biggest asteroid in the main belt, and is named after the Greek goddess of health.  It is estimated to contain 2.9% of the total mass of the entire asteroid belt, and was discovered by the Italian astronomer Annibale de Gasparis on April 12, 1849.   Hygiea is also the most oblate of the largest asteroids, with estimated dimensions of 530 x 407 x 370 km.   Visual Mag 9.5, 0.3 arcsec.  It may be possible to capture with a long exposure image of the star field and look for a small streak as it moves within the star field.

Really enjoyed the information you provided for each object! Bob


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#3 Alien Observatory

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 12:45 AM

Really enjoyed the information you provided for each object! Bob

TY, it is just a copy, paste and edit from various web sources.  We all stand on the shoulders of those who discovered these objects, sometimes millennia ago.  Many of these objects have a very interesting history that is often bypassed in the desire to capture as many objects as possible  without looking at the history and the interesting properties of the object being observed. Pat Utah smile.gif


Edited by Alien Observatory, 01 May 2022 - 10:39 AM.

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#4 alphatripleplus

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 07:15 AM

Nice selection. Thanks.


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#5 MartinMeredith

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 08:09 AM

Thanks for the objects.

 

The globular cluster NGC 5466 is particularly interesting, as you point out. I have a couple of captures, one in mono, one in LRGB, and the many blue stars are evident in the latter. It also has a couple of galaxies nearby that are worth a look. The brighter of the two is mag 15.4 CGCG162-058 and is interesting in part because its inclination and type presents a Saturn-like appearance to us. There are also a bunch of quasars in the field, one of which (SDSS J14054+2840) is redshift 3.2 and mag 19.5, so a nice challenge in itself.

 

Rather than post images from the past now, I'll see if I can get to this one during the month...


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#6 steveincolo

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 09:05 AM

I was up late last night, so this one was legitimately viewed in May!  It's the first object I viewed by EAA, August 4th last year.  

 

Messier 57 01May22 01 38 52

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#7 alphatripleplus

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 12:02 PM

Wow, you are the early bird, Steve.


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#8 Larry Mc

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 01:35 PM

Here's a EAA observation of galaxy M83 in Hydra from 4/26 at Calhoun Cty Park in central West Virginia. At the time M83 had a 21deg elevation.

(8" SCT @ f6.3 on a Atlas Gem, ZWO ASI294MC camera with L-Pro filter, 3 minute subs, dark & flat calibration frames, PHD guided, livestacked using Sharpcap for 30 minutes).

Attached Thumbnails

  • M83-04262022.jpg

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#9 Cey42

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 02:37 PM

Nice diverse list. M57 holds a special place in my heart because it was the first object I observed using EAA.

 

 

Here is the SkySafari observing list.

Attached File  CN May22.skylist   1.86KB   17 downloads

 


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#10 GaryShaw

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Posted 01 May 2022 - 05:50 PM

Nice diverse list. M57 holds a special place in my heart because it was the first object I observed using EAA.

 

 

Here is the SkySafari observing list.

attachicon.gifCN May22.skylist

Hi- M57 holds a special place in my heart as well - our younger daughter is named ‘Lyra’.

 

Gary

 

ps: I’ve never been able to load one of your SS lists. Is there a secret trick?


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#11 Alien Observatory

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Posted 02 May 2022 - 11:57 AM

Hi- M57 holds a special place in my heart as well - our younger daughter is named ‘Lyra’.

 

Gary

 

ps: I’ve never been able to load one of your SS lists. Is there a secret trick?

I was able to download the File to my iMac, share it with an email addressed to my self.  Then on my iPad I was able to open the email, and share to the SkySafari app successfully.

 

 I have failed in all attempts to open the list or import the list using my SkySafari app on the iMac as SS just crashes immediately, which was identified as a problem to SS in 2019.  Pat Utah smile.gif


Edited by Alien Observatory, 02 May 2022 - 12:49 PM.

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#12 BrentKnight

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Posted 02 May 2022 - 12:48 PM

iTunes?

I think the easiest way for Android is the email to yourself method. Just opening the attachment adds it to SkySafai. If you then open LiveSky it will be available to all your devices.
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#13 alphatripleplus

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Posted 02 May 2022 - 04:01 PM

Here is a look at M83 at about 23degrees altitude last night. 8 minute total exposure with my AT130EDT at f/5.5 and ASI290MM at 300 gain, no filters and no binning using ASILive:

 

M83; 32 x 15 sec

 

M83_f5.5F_Light_Stack_32frames_15sec_RS_Bin1_22.5C_gain300_2022-05-01_233116.jpg

 

It really is a round target if you trace the faint outer edge of the spiral arms around the galaxy.


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#14 jkmonroe

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Posted 02 May 2022 - 10:27 PM

Quick outing tonight before the wind really picked up.  Snagged NGC5466 from the challenge list. 

 

ZS73 w/ ASI290MM on the AZ-GTi.  Saved as viewed.

 

58 frames, 290 seconds.

NGC5466 58frames 290s 23 19 29 WithDisplayStretch

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#15 wmorrison58

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 06:00 AM

NGC40

ES127 @ 952 FL

ZWO ASI294 MC Pro
Total Frames= 26

Total Exposure = 426s
Gain=400
Exposure=16.000s
Temperature=-10
Apply Flat=None
Subtract Dark=None
 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Stack_26frames_416s_WithDisplayStretch.jpg

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#16 SchoolMaster

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 07:57 AM

Working on other things I got these in passing.

 

C8, GEM28, 0.63, ZWO 294MC  image scale 0.70"/px, f/6.3 at .  Clear, humid, 70F, still.  Vignetting still, but much better than two reducers.

 

Gain 350, 15 x 20 secs, Dark(75F) Flat.

 

M5

 

04MayM5-9C8-G350MR63-15-20-DF.jpg

 

M57

 

04MayM57-9C8-G350MR63-15-20-DF.jpg

 

I'm not sure the colors are right, but that's my life frown.gif


Edited by SchoolMaster, 04 May 2022 - 10:16 AM.

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#17 Alien Observatory

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 09:16 AM

M5 last night before the clouds moved in.  Stellina (80 mm, F5, ZWO 178 mc) 15 minutes, 10 sec subs.  Pat Utah smile.gif

Attached Thumbnails

  • M5_May_03_2022 copy.jpeg

Edited by Alien Observatory, 04 May 2022 - 09:17 AM.

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#18 SchoolMaster

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 10:18 AM

M5 last night before the clouds moved in.  Stellina (80 mm, F5, ZWO 178 mc) 15 minutes, 10 sec subs.  Pat Utah smile.gif

Same exposure, different sub-length, very different hardware combination produces a very similar image.


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#19 Alien Observatory

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 10:50 AM

Same exposure, different sub-length, very different hardware combination produces a very similar image.

I need to make a correction: Stellina (80mm, F5, 178 mc Sensor, Bin 2, 15 minute, 10 sec subs), but yes many different ways to get a similar image of an object, which makes EAA interesting as the number of equipment / cam combinations is almost unlimited...  Pat Utah :)


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#20 PeterAB

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 05:46 PM

I had an unexpected clear night last night.   I picked up a couple of the easy objects.   Seeing was good.   Transparency good to almost m4 with the naked eye.    Temperatures were coldish for this time of year (34F) and dew point was just a little higher.    I was chasing off the fog from my corrector plate and finders with a hair dryer.

 

I used my Meade 2080 8 inch SCT on the original tracking fork.    ASI294mc camera set to bin2.    Sharpcap live stack.   15 second exposures.    Darks only.    I wasn't expecting the clear night and neglected to set up flats that help a lot with this SCT.

 

Both North up, east left 52'x35'.

 

M57 735 seconds (49x15s)

1-m57_Stack_49frames_735s.jpg

 

M5  345 seconds (23x15s)

1-m5_Stack_23frames_345s.jpg

 

Peter


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#21 SchoolMaster

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 06:01 PM

I had an unexpected clear night last night.   I picked up a couple of the easy objects.   Seeing was good.   Transparency good to almost m4 with the naked eye.    Temperatures were coldish for this time of year (34F) and dew point was just a little higher.    I was chasing off the fog from my corrector plate and finders with a hair dryer.

 

I used my Meade 2080 8 inch SCT on the original tracking fork.    ASI294mc camera set to bin2.    Sharpcap live stack.   15 second exposures.    Darks only.    I wasn't expecting the clear night and neglected to set up flats that help a lot with this SCT.

 

Both North up, east left 52'x35'.

 

M57 735 seconds (49x15s)

attachicon.gif1-m57_Stack_49frames_735s.jpg

 

M5  345 seconds (23x15s)

attachicon.gif1-m5_Stack_23frames_345s.jpg

 

Peter

Similar OTA, same camera, and your lack of flats is better than mine with flats :)



#22 PeterAB

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 06:56 PM

Similar OTA, same camera, and your lack of flats is better than mine with flats smile.gif

I moved the black level way up in the hysterogram (right of the peak) and clipped out the center brightness.    This works okay when the object fits in the bright center like m5 and m57.    I have lost details away from the center.    There is a galaxy just NW of M57  (IC 1296) that got clipped on my image.    I can see it on yours.

 

Thanks,  Peter


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#23 SchoolMaster

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Posted 04 May 2022 - 07:44 PM

That's what I like about these challenges, different paths to 'success'


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#24 wmorrison58

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Posted 05 May 2022 - 04:09 PM

ST1
ES127mm @ 952 FL

ZWO ASI294MC Pro
Frames= 100
Total Exposure= 200s
Gain=400
Exposure=2.000s
Temperature=-10
Apply Flat=None
Subtract Dark=None

Attached Thumbnails

  • Stack_100frames_200s_WithDisplayStretch.jpg

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#25 Alien Observatory

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Posted 05 May 2022 - 09:15 PM

I did a very poor job in describing Stephenson 1.  It is a very small open cluster located in Lyra.  It is very close to a massive red giant, Delta 2 Lyra.  Pat Utah smile.gif

Attached Thumbnails

  • stephenson1.jpg

Edited by Alien Observatory, 05 May 2022 - 09:16 PM.

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