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What is a normal noisy/hot pixel behavior for a used Canon 6D?

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#26 piaras

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Posted 14 May 2022 - 08:15 AM

The more lights you take, the signal swamps the noise. Here is an example of over 150 lights taken with my 6D before I switched to the RA, at 30-60 seconds and ISO 800 and 1600. This photo was taken with no darks, bias nor flats. I should of taken a set of flats for the dust motes. 

Pierre

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Edited by piaras, 14 May 2022 - 08:48 AM.

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#27 vidrazor

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Posted 14 May 2022 - 08:38 AM

I appreciate the advice guys, but like I said, I have a while to wait for my OTA. I'll look at more reliable sources for canon 6d's, and I am also looking at used Nikon d600's or other full frame cameras with good low light ISO. 

What makes you think you need a full frame sensor anyway? The vast majority of astro images are shot with APS-C and even smaller sensors. You don't need a large sensor to mitigate noise, you need time. You need lots of subs, especially if you're shooting in a high Bortle location. Below is only 3 hour's worth of the Cygnus Loop shot in Bortle 9 with a full frame D600 on an AT60ED. Not too impressive, right? But hey, it's a full frame sensor, no? It looks like crap because I didn't shoot enough time, and then I proceeded to pull hens teeth LOL. I would've needed about 10-15 hour's worth of time (in Bortle 9) to get this right. This was a project I had started but unfortunately could not finish at the time, I'll try it again next fall.

 

So really, don't get too hung up on having a full frame sensor to shoot astro. An APS-C based camera will allow you access to more scopes that will vignette significantly on a full frame sensor as well. But you already have the 6D, you could just roll with it when you get your scope.

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Edited by vidrazor, 14 May 2022 - 10:32 AM.

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#28 asanmax

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Posted 14 May 2022 - 11:35 AM

What makes you think you need a full frame sensor anyway? The vast majority of astro images are shot with APS-C and even smaller sensors. You don't need a large sensor to mitigate noise, you need time. You need lots of subs, especially if you're shooting in a high Bortle location. Below is only 3 hour's worth of the Cygnus Loop shot in Bortle 9 with a full frame D600 on an AT60ED. Not too impressive, right? But hey, it's a full frame sensor, no? It looks like crap because I didn't shoot enough time, and then I proceeded to pull hens teeth LOL. I would've needed about 10-15 hour's worth of time (in Bortle 9) to get this right. This was a project I had started but unfortunately could not finish at the time, I'll try it again next fall.

 

So really, don't get too hung up on having a full frame sensor to shoot astro. An APS-C based camera will allow you access to more scopes that will vignette significantly on a full frame sensor as well. But you already have the 6D, you could just roll with it when you get your scope.

Very good point considering most of the scopes don't have an image circle large enough to cover a full frame sensor with a nice and flat image.



#29 piaras

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Posted 14 May 2022 - 01:34 PM

Mostly I use my RA day and night. Also when doing photos with prime lenses on the larger targets. 
Pierre



#30 zernikepolynomial

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Posted 15 May 2022 - 04:40 AM

The more lights you take, the signal swamps the noise. Here is an example of over 150 lights taken with my 6D before I switched to the RA, at 30-60 seconds and ISO 800 and 1600. This photo was taken with no darks, bias nor flats. I should of taken a set of flats for the dust motes. 

Pierre

It completely depends on the telescope and guiding when determining what you can get away with.



#31 zernikepolynomial

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Posted 15 May 2022 - 04:43 AM

What makes you think you need a full frame sensor anyway? The vast majority of astro images are shot with APS-C and even smaller sensors. You don't need a large sensor to mitigate noise, you need time. You need lots of subs, especially if you're shooting in a high Bortle location. Below is only 3 hour's worth of the Cygnus Loop shot in Bortle 9 with a full frame D600 on an AT60ED. Not too impressive, right? But hey, it's a full frame sensor, no? It looks like crap because I didn't shoot enough time, and then I proceeded to pull hens teeth LOL. I would've needed about 10-15 hour's worth of time (in Bortle 9) to get this right. This was a project I had started but unfortunately could not finish at the time, I'll try it again next fall.

 

So really, don't get too hung up on having a full frame sensor to shoot astro. An APS-C based camera will allow you access to more scopes that will vignette significantly on a full frame sensor as well. But you already have the 6D, you could just roll with it when you get your scope.

I never said you need a full frame camera to mitigate noise. I think we are getting into territory that is better discussed in its own thread.



#32 zernikepolynomial

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Posted 15 May 2022 - 04:44 AM

Very good point considering most of the scopes don't have an image circle large enough to cover a full frame sensor with a nice and flat image.

There are many scopes that do have an image circle large enough to cover a full frame sensor and remain flat. Also, discussion for another thread.



#33 zernikepolynomial

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Posted 15 May 2022 - 05:09 AM

Going to check the voltage on my battery. Got another tip in a different thread I created.




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