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Unable to align secondary mirror to focuser tube

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#26 deSitter

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Posted 20 May 2022 - 11:01 AM

OK so this must seem a blur of information, so let me reduce it to this exact scope (in another branding) and how I managed to accurately and more or less permanently collimate it - a process made more difficult by the finicky screws and the "floating" spider.

 

0) Study the construction of the entire assembly outside of the scope.

1) Remove the secondary completely leaving only the spider vanes and hub.

2) Shove the spider vanes as far rearward as they will go in their slots.

3) Remove the primary cell leaving an empty tube other than the spider vanes and hub. You don't want the reflection in the primary confusing you as you set the position of the secondary.

4) Make absolutely sure the spider hub is centered in the tube. I made a cardboard template I could place over the vanes with an alignment hole in the center. Adjust the length of the spider vanes using the knurled nuts so that the center hole of the spider aligns with the center hole of the template.

5) Put a piece of white paper opposite the focuser.

6) Install the secondary in the spider hub but back out the 3 adjusters so that the secondary flops around on its center post.

7) Holding the secondary assembly with your hand, tug on it toward the rear and manipulate it until you find the place where you can center it in the focuser, by adjusting the center post position. After this, do NOT adjust the center post again.

8) Turn in the 3 adjusters until they hold the secondary fixed.

9) Look at the image of the open rear end of the tube in the secondary. You want to have the end of the focuser tube, the outline of the secondary, and the image of the open end of the tube all concentric.

 

Doing this, be aware of the degrees of freedom you have. They are the 3 adjusters, and the rotational position of the secondary. The 2 adjusters opposite the focuser should go in the same number of turns very nearly. The final adjustment should be using the 1 adjuster on the focuser side of the hub - this controls the tilt of the secondary.

 

Once the secondary is properly positioned, replace the primary cell and do not touch the secondary again.

 

All this need not be done with millimeter precision at f/10. If it looks right, it is right.

 

-drl


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#27 Vic Menard

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Posted 20 May 2022 - 11:55 AM

I think we're pretty much on the same page.

To clarify:

 

"2) Shove the spider vanes as far rearward as they will go in their slots." By "rearward" you mean toward the primary mirror end of the tube assembly.

 

"All this need not be done with millimeter precision at f/10. If it looks right, it is right." The allowable axial errors for a 4-inch f/10 are ~3mm for the focuser axial alignment (the centering of the reflection of the primary mirror relative to the bottom edge of the focuser) and ~10mm for the primary mirror axial alignment (the centering of the reflection of the underside of the focuser relative to the primary mirror  reflection).


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#28 deSitter

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Posted 20 May 2022 - 12:00 PM

I think we're pretty much on the same page.

To clarify:

 

"2) Shove the spider vanes as far rearward as they will go in their slots." By "rearward" you mean toward the primary mirror end of the tube assembly.

 

"All this need not be done with millimeter precision at f/10. If it looks right, it is right." The allowable axial errors for a 4-inch f/10 are ~3mm for the focuser axial alignment (the centering of the reflection of the primary mirror relative to the bottom edge of the focuser) and ~10mm for the primary mirror axial alignment (the centering of the reflection of the underside of the focuser relative to the primary mirror  reflection).

Yes, piece of cake! It's much harder at f/4.5!

 

-drl


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#29 telesonic

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Posted 20 May 2022 - 05:14 PM

Patrick,

 

My C-4.5 scope has the exact same spider vane arrangement as your scope, and yes.... as basic as it may seem - the fact that the holes in the tube are elongated makes it quite bit of work to align the secondary. I'm not entirely sure why that was done on these scopes, but it had to be for a reason. If anyone knows, I'd like to hear it.

 

I always hated that setup, so last night I yanked the secondary and spider out - for a trip to the hardware store today. I am going to use deSitter's idea of using nuts and washers on the vanes, instead of those funky thumb screws. In this case, there will be a nut and washer on the inside of the tube and another washer and nut likewise on the outside of the tube. (a total of 6 nuts, and 6 fender washers) I think this setup will be far better than the original, and now have the hardware in hand to do this - I just need to blacken the shiny hardware before installation.

 

For future information - the threads on these spider vanes are 3mm x .50.

 

 

Cheers,

T

 

 


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#30 patrickt

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Posted 20 May 2022 - 10:34 PM

KBHORNBLOWER - Crystal clear now, thank you.

 

VIC MENARD - I will make the 4 inch paper disk with the central doughnut, since removing the small nuts and screws seem pretty straightforward. Good thing i enjoy planetary, hence my slow scopes.

 

DESITTER -  Post#26 / 3) Wouldnt blocking the Primary mirror from the secondary with paper do the same thing ? Regardless, i'm taking out the Primary Cell anyway.  4) I will make your suggested cardboard template as well.  9) This of course while keeping my eye reasonably centered.  Post #28 -  Just my luck that i use slow scopes.

 

TELESONIC -  I would do the same if i could easily get those nuts, which are just not available at general hardwares. I may need to check an Electronics/Computer parts store. And thanks for the nut size.

 

EVERYONE -  With all the great responses i've gotten from you guys, i am just so excited and motivated to finally get this portion of the entire collimation process done. You guys rock ! Thanks again. I will let you know how it turns out.

Patrick


Edited by patrickt, 20 May 2022 - 10:35 PM.

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#31 deSitter

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Posted 20 May 2022 - 10:42 PM

KBHORNBLOWER - Crystal clear now, thank you.

 

VIC MENARD - I will make the 4 inch paper disk with the central doughnut, since removing the small nuts and screws seem pretty straightforward. Good thing i enjoy planetary, hence my slow scopes.

 

DESITTER -  Post#26 / 3) Wouldnt blocking the Primary mirror from the secondary with paper do the same thing ? Regardless, i'm taking out the Primary Cell anyway.  4) I will make your suggested cardboard template as well.  9) This of course while keeping my eye reasonably centered.  Post #28 -  Just my luck that i use slow scopes.

 

TELESONIC -  I would do the same if i could easily get those nuts, which are just not available at general hardwares. I may need to check an Electronics/Computer parts store. And thanks for the nut size.

 

EVERYONE -  With all the great responses i've gotten from you guys, i am just so excited and motivated to finally get this portion of the entire collimation process done. You guys rock ! Thanks again. I will let you know how it turns out.

Patrick

It would be harder to put a piece of paper over it than removing the assembly. Likely it needs inspecting anyway.

 

-drl


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#32 patrickt

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Posted 21 May 2022 - 08:59 AM

Ok, i checked the previous adjustments i did to the Vane Length ( from the Tube Wall to Center Screw) : 86mm on all three. Any differences would be in fractions of a millimeter.

 

     I then checked the length from the inside edge of the front tube stiffener to the secondary holder : 27 to 28mm for 2 vanes, and 29mm for another vane. The 3 vane screws outside the tube are all maximally pushed forward in their slots. So i imagine that would be satisfactory ?  I have removed the white paper blocking the primary mirror (which isnt visible). But i understand i have to ensure the secondary mirror is  aligned with the focuser, before tackling primary mirror alignment.

 

    And here is an image of the view taken against the sky. I can see the secondary mirror is still elongated and still too low "vertically", as well as too far from the left (as seen in the picture).  And for good measure, I will make Desitter's cardboard piece with the hole in the middle. I see its just a matter of taking off the little screws and nuts to take the front tube stiffener off to make a trace of the tube for the cardboard piece.

 

    So assuming the cardboard template further verifies the alignment of the secondary cell, i understand the next step is to loosen the center screw, just enough to allow the secondary to be rotated to get the secondary mirror as round as possible, then using the 3 secondary tilt screws as needed, to further make it rounder if need be.  

 

     I am curious how fiddling with the secondary Center and 3 Tilt screws will help move up the secondary ? hmm. Well i'll find out i guess...

 

 

    I'm  wondering though (if i had to remove the Rear tube Stiffener), does it use nuts inside for the 6 litlle screws on the outside as well ? If it does, i dont see how my arm is even going to reach the nuts inside.... Or are there nuts permanently attached inside, so that i only need to mess with the little screws outside ? 

 

 

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Edited by patrickt, 21 May 2022 - 09:38 AM.


#33 Vic Menard

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Posted 21 May 2022 - 10:28 AM

...I have removed the white paper blocking the primary mirror (which isnt visible). But i understand i have to ensure the secondary mirror is  aligned with the focuser, before tackling primary mirror alignment.

As I mentioned earlier, you really need to be able to see at least the edge of the primary mirror (or using deSitter's method, the bottom edge of the tube assembly) as there are three circles that must be concentric for optimal secondary mirror placement:

the bottom edge of the focuser,

the actual edge of the secondary mirror, and

the reflected edge of the primary mirror (or the bottom edge of the tube assembly).

 

Your secondary mirror is presenting as an ellipse with the major axis from 9 o'clock to 3 o'clock, so there is still a tilt component error. Usually when I see a secondary mirror that is shifted on the axis perpendicular to the tube axis (12 o'clock to 6 o'clock), I suspect a combined tilt/rotation error. But I really need to see the edge of the primary mirror to be sure. Given the information I have from your image, the red circle would be the optimal secondary mirror placement, but I need to see that third circle...

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#34 patrickt

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Posted 21 May 2022 - 07:13 PM

VIC MENARD -

                          So do you mean that my next step should be to adjust the secondary Center screw and Tilt screws to show the full third circle (Primary mirror image) ?   And for the purposes of this step, does the secondary mirror have to be perfectly round when showing the third circle ?

 

                         By the way, i did take off the Primary mirror to clean it up, prior to having started this post. I mentioned that just to say that the Primary is probably grossly (?) out of collimation. And if that is the case, can i safely assume that i only need to adjust the secondary mirror to reveal the third circle (Primary mirror) ? 

 

                        Also, am i correct to assume that you need to see the Primary mirror circle to help give you an idea of the relative position of the secondary mirror in both vertical and horizontal axes ? Thanks again.


Edited by patrickt, 21 May 2022 - 07:28 PM.


#35 telesonic

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 12:27 AM

Patrick,

 

Yes, you can adjust the secondary mirror without the primary mirror installed in the tube. It's not mentioned very often, perhaps because it's an older mechanical method not useful for faster newtonians (which your scope is not) so it fell out of favor.

 

deSitter mentions this on post #26 above.

 

I have used that similar method on my scope a few times, when I had to align the secondary. To me, it was simply easier with the primary removed as I was re-doing the center spot, or adding springs on the primary cell - and you don't have to try to figure out all of the reflections. If you already have the primary mirror out, might as well try and see if it works for you. I found it works well, and gets it close enough to only require minor adjustments once everything is back together.

 

Some of the older astronomy books mention this method as well, and that is actually where I learned about it several years ago. Seems like black magic now...

 

 

And also, Vic will get you dialed in on it. Genuine wizard with his image overlayments, and explanations. salute.gif

(not diminishing anyone else here, just had to say it.)

 

 

T



#36 SteveG

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 01:31 AM

VIC MENARD -

                          So do you mean that my next step should be to adjust the secondary Center screw and Tilt screws to show the full third circle (Primary mirror image) ?   And for the purposes of this step, does the secondary mirror have to be perfectly round when showing the third circle ?

 

                         By the way, i did take off the Primary mirror to clean it up, prior to having started this post. I mentioned that just to say that the Primary is probably grossly (?) out of collimation. And if that is the case, can i safely assume that i only need to adjust the secondary mirror to reveal the third circle (Primary mirror) ? 

 

                        Also, am i correct to assume that you need to see the Primary mirror circle to help give you an idea of the relative position of the secondary mirror in both vertical and horizontal axes ? Thanks again.

I think what Vic is saying is that the picture isn’t close enough (inward) to allow us to see the reflected edge of your primary when looking at the secondary.

This is needed to fully diagnose your collimation. What tool are we looking through in these pictures?



#37 patrickt

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 07:29 AM

TELESONIC -

                         Actually i already cleaned the Primary, and put a  doughnut on it ( before i even started this post) and put it back on . But i will give it a shot anyway, and take out the Primary cell. Thanks again !

 

STEVEG -

                   I had explained to VIC MENARD on page 1 that all i had was a standard webcam and cellphone that ( because of the design) could not take pics through a collimation cap.   

 

                  So i very carefully compared my visual views through the collimation cap, and just stuck the webcam (which fit  very well in the 0.96 inch focuser),  thankfully giving me the same views. This latest picture though was just my cellphone that i propped on the focuser, and thankfully was squared enough to image what i had actually seen through the collimation cap.   

 

                      Also, even moving the focuser inward fully, still failed to show the primary mirror (probably because the secondary still needs adjustment...). Thanks for responding.

 

ALL -  

           I've been busy, so all i've been able to do is cut out the cardboard template with a hole in the middle. Given that it was not quite a perfect circle, the secondary central bolt ended up (at most) maybe 1mm. away from the hole. I will continue tomorrow then (its right now 8:30 pm over here).

Patrick



#38 Asbytec

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 08:06 AM

"Given that it was not quite a perfect circle, the secondary central bolt ended up (at most) maybe 1mm."

Close enough. From there you'll use diagonal tilt movement to bring the diagonal under the focuser (in the vertical as mentioned earlier), not tightening or loosening the spider vanes. Also you mentioned one spider attachment point on the tube is 1mm differnce than the other two. That's close enough, too. You'll correct for that small error when you tilt the diagonal mirror during focuser axial alignment. No worries. The important thing is the oversized hole holds the attachment point securely so the spider doesn't move and your diagonal placement and collimation will stay where you put it.

Edited by Asbytec, 22 May 2022 - 08:10 AM.

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#39 patrickt

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 08:22 AM

ASBYTEC -

                     That is reassuring to know concerning the measurements.  I am confident enough about the tightness of the screw in the oversized holes, though will use nuts as suggested by desitter, if and when i do find the right sized nuts...  You likely know as well that these sizes are not normally found in General Hardwares in the Philippines.  Thanks for replying.


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#40 Asbytec

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 09:04 AM

That is reassuring to know concerning the measurements. I am confident enough about the tightness of the screw in the oversized holes...


Just popped in to say, yea, we're not looking for mechanical alignment, we're shooting for optical alignment of adjustable mirrors within a tolerance (mentioned above). So the mechanics can be off a little, close enough is good enough. I'm glad your confident in the rigidity you built in. The mechanics should hold the optical alignment.

Yes, hard to find stuff here sometimes. Working with what I could find, I fabricated slow motion knobs from wooded drawer handles. They lasted longer than the original plastic ones. :)

Anyway, you're getting collimation advice from the best. I just didn't want you to worry about a mechanical millimeter here or there. The diagonal adjustments will take care of that. When you collimate the axes, all the optical stuff will fall into place.
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#41 Vic Menard

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 11:53 AM

                          1.) So do you mean that my next step should be to adjust the secondary Center screw and Tilt screws to show the full third circle (Primary mirror image) ?   And for the purposes of this step, does the secondary mirror have to be perfectly round when showing the third circle ?

 

                         2.) By the way, i did take off the Primary mirror to clean it up, prior to having started this post. I mentioned that just to say that the Primary is probably grossly (?) out of collimation. And if that is the case, can i safely assume that i only need to adjust the secondary mirror to reveal the third circle (Primary mirror) ? 

 

                        3.) Also, am i correct to assume that you need to see the Primary mirror circle to help give you an idea of the relative position of the secondary mirror in both vertical and horizontal axes ? Thanks again.

1.) It's difficult to say what adjustment is needed without knowing that the secondary mirror tilt is currently pointing the focuser axis straight down the tube assembly toward the primary mirror or open end of the tube*. Your current image looks like your secondary mirror needs to be tilted upward's (toward 12 o'clock) and tilted away from the focuser (to shorten the long axis going from 9 o'clock to 3 o'clock). But without knowing that the primary mirror reflection is in fact, centered relative to the blue cross hairs in the image, I can't be certain in my assessment of the secondary mirror placement. And assuming it's centered is not the best way to proceed.

 

2.) This should have little to no impact on the centering of the primary.

 

3.) If all of the various geometries are correct ("squared" focuser, 90-degree intercept, perpendicular spider, centered secondary mirror, etc.), the correctly centered secondary mirror relative to the bottom edge of the tube should be "centered" on both "vertical and horizontal axes". In practice, the various geometries are not held to strict tolerances, so I don't usually count on a perfectly "round" secondary mirror that's perfectly "centered" in the focuser, but I DO count on a "centered" primary mirror reflection and a "centered" reflection of the underside of the focuser--to the prescribed tolerances for image performance.

 

*I've attached an annotated image with a "possible" view of the primary mirror reflection (large red circle) and primary mirror center marker/donut (small red circle) precisely centered in the focuser (blue circle with blue cross hairs). If this is indeed the current state of affairs, the optimal secondary mirror placement is the green circle.

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Edited by Vic Menard, 22 May 2022 - 11:56 AM.

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#42 patrickt

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 08:50 PM

ASBYTEC -

                     Thanks for the further assurances. Wooden knobs huh, well necessity is the mother of invention,  praises to diy 🙂.   And i realize being in CN blesses me with some really great minds !

 

VIC MENARD -

                           1) I realize that at this point, you can only surmise the secondary's state of alignment. Your of course correct about not assuming its centered.   But basing it on my image, you mentioned that  the current image looks like the secondary needs to be tilted upwards (towards 12 o clock ), and tilted away from the focuser. I'm not sure which way exactly you meant. Here are two (ugly, sorry) drawings i made. Do any of them illustrate your description ? Or not ? Sorry, sort of hard to visualize in my mind...

 

                          3) Very thorough explanation, thank you !

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#43 Asbytec

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Posted 22 May 2022 - 10:17 PM

We normally mean 12 o'clock to mean "up" as seen looking down through the focuser with respect to the image you posted. Imagine the blue cross hair in Vic's annotation as a clock face. Then 12 o'clock is, well, at 12 o'clock. Straight up. The vertical blue line is the Y axis. The horizontal blue line would be the X axis toward or away, "left or right", from the primary mirror toward the 3 o'clock at the right of your image. The latter is controlled by the center bolt.

Look down the tube at the back of the spider. You should see two screws in that plane, and a third screw off by itself. The two screws will form a line perpendicular to the focuser axis, and the lone screw will be in line with the focuser. You tilt the diagonal "up" toward 12 o'clock by tightening one of the two screws (bottom) and loosening the opposing screw (top) in that perpendicular plane. The third screw all by itself will tilt the diagonal toward or away from the focuser (as you show in your drawing) because it is in line with the focuser.

Gosh, I hope that makes sense. But, yes, directions are normally with respect to the view seen and the image taken through the focuser.

Edited by Asbytec, 22 May 2022 - 10:26 PM.

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#44 patrickt

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Posted 23 May 2022 - 08:07 AM

ASBYTEC -

                      Yes, it all make sense so far. I did try the Central and Tilt screws of the secondary, and did manage to better center the secondary mirror under the focuser,  except it was still out of round... 

 

                       But i will try again tomorrow as i had limited daylight time this afternoon, due to the inclement weather (i think the rainy season is coming ?? ).

 

                        For now, I just want to get this Newt collimated "respectably", to try out on Jupiter and Saturn, and even Mars, before the really bad rains come, yikes !     

 

                       I did get one chance to see Jupiter early this month (after i took out and cleaned the primary, and did what i thought was a collimation).  Its four satellites were in fact round, both North and South Temperate zones were visible, etc.. So i cant wait to see what the views will look like (weather permitting) after the collimation ! 

 

                       So i will continue tomorrow and see how it goes... 



#45 Asbytec

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Posted 23 May 2022 - 09:07 AM

Patrick, you can still align the focuser and primary axes (almost) despite the secondary position. It may be out of round or tilted differently, but it has to have this "combined tilt and rotation error" to align the axes from anywhere other than dead center of the focuser. Think about looking at a spot on the wall with a hand held mirror. Move the mirror, then you have to change the tilt and rotation to see that spot again. It's the same with the diagonal mirror. You may experience some vignette of the field of view, but the axes can be aligned regardless. You can still see the spot. (If you're using a laser, I believe Vic pointed you to Jason's method. Highly recommended). 

But, of course, you have to see the reflection of the primary mirror to align the cross hair to the primary center and the primary center to the Cheshire. You can also use the primary reflection to "round" or rotate the diagonal. The closer the diagonal is to the focuser center, the more "round" it will be with the proper rotation. To rotate my diagonal, I like to see the primary reflection centered on the diagonal major axis. This means the primary center mark is also on the diagonal major axis. This simple concept abruptly ended my collimation frustration and ignited an epiphany! (Hat tip Starman1) So, I use the primary reflection as a guide to diagonal rotation instead of blocking it from view. 

Here's an interesting tidbit. Once the focuser is aligned to the primary center, the primary reflection *must* be centered under the focuser. When the centers of two circles coincide, so too must their edges be concentric. You can use the fact the primary reflection is centered under the focuser to evaluate the position of the diagonal which can also be centered under the focuser. You do this by focusing outward until the primary mirror appears slightly smaller than the diagonal. Any displacement of the diagonal can be easily seen against the primary reflection known to be centered under the focuser. Especially if the diagonal is not centered. More on that after your night out.

 

Oh, above I mentioned you will see two tilt screws in a line perpendicular to the focuser and one off by itself in line with the focuser. You should see that arrangement. If not, I'd advise rotating your spider assembly until you do. This arrangement makes tilting the diagonal better behaved. It's helpful to use the tilt screws working together rather than randomly working against each other. Tighten one, then loosen the opposing screw(s). Walk the tilt methodically into place instead of forcing it by tightening one or any other screw more or less randomly.

 

Pic below is courtesy of CN member Kipperfeet. The lone screw "A" is in line with the focuser and can be below the spider hub or above it, so long as it is in line with the focuser. (Note how the offset lip (major axis) of the diagonal is offset directly away from the focuser. When looking down the focuser, the dark reflection of the diagonal as seen in the primary will appear to point directly at the primary mirror. That's good rotation, and it starts with careful centering). 

 

Secondary Orientation 1.jpg


Edited by Asbytec, 23 May 2022 - 10:20 AM.


#46 Vic Menard

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Posted 23 May 2022 - 12:03 PM

...good rotation...starts with careful centering. 

 

waytogo.gif

But don't forget the carefully leveled ("squared") focuser, and the carefully "squared" (perpendicular) spider and "centered" hub, and (cringing) the correctly mounted secondary mirror (major axis of secondary correctly aligned to the major axis of the stalk). And "good" tilt is equally important (since tilt and rotation work in tandem).  

 

What's important, is that, given these potential geometry failures (and it's likely you will encounter one or more in your collimation efforts), it's still possible to meet the prescribed axial tolerances with an "optimal" (if not perfectly "rounded" and/or "concentric") secondary mirror placement and achieve high-magnification image performance with these secondary mirror errors "in place".

 

And remember, if centering the primary mirror reflection relative to the secondary mirror requires offsetting the primary mirror reflection centering relative to the focuser--always defer to the focuser centering! A primary mirror reflection centered in the secondary mirror is not an indication of good alignment unless the primary mirror reflection is also centered in the focuser.


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#47 Vic Menard

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Posted 23 May 2022 - 12:21 PM

...Pic below is courtesy of CN member Kipperfeet. The lone screw "A" is in line with the focuser and can be below the spider hub or above it, so long as it is in line with the focuser.

 

attachicon.gifSecondary Orientation 1.jpg

Nice.

Assuming you start with both axes corrected and secondary mirror placement needs correction, adjusting the central mounting screw to move the secondary mirror closer to or farther from the primary mirror will require a linked tilt adjustment using screw "A" to correct the changed focuser axial alignment (which will then require realignment of the primary mirror axis). Similarly, assuming you start with both axes corrected, adjusting the secondary mirror rotation will require a linked tilt adjustment using screw "B" or "C" to correct the changed focuser axial alignment (which will then require realignment of the primary mirror axis). Secondary mirror adjustments should always be approached as combined adjustments*--tilt/fore and aft (offset), and tilt/rotation (skew).

 

*It's rare to make a rotation or fore an aft adjustment that delivers correct axial alignment. 


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#48 ccwemyss

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Posted 23 May 2022 - 04:01 PM

Makes you appreciate how John Dobson would cut a piece of closet pole at a 45 degree angle to hold the secondary, glue four pieces of wood shingle or paint stick to it, and jam it into place with friction against the inside of the sonotube, with a couple of screw eyes and a thread as a safety line, in case it started to fall toward the primary. Somehow, he managed to get good collimation without a lot of fiddly screws. 

 

Chip W. 


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#49 Asbytec

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Posted 23 May 2022 - 06:08 PM

*It's rare to make a rotation or fore an aft adjustment that delivers correct axial alignment.


Yes and I appreciate your reply, Vic. Thats probably why good centering and rotation is step one, to minimize combined tilt and rotation error that has to be corrected. Unless it's needed to align the axes. It's funny diagonal position in step 1 has least impact on image quality, but it sure makes life easier during axial alignment in step 2. :)

Edited by Asbytec, 23 May 2022 - 06:41 PM.


#50 patrickt

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Posted 23 May 2022 - 09:09 PM

       Guys, i truly appreciate all the effort you put into tryng to help me out.

 

       But rest assured i am (very) slowly understanding both the practical and conceptual ideas.  I just need more time (including hands on time), to absorb and apply all this great info.I am actually going back and forth with what you've presented so far, lots for me to digest, but it is worth it...  In fact i better get on it right now. Sorry i'm not able to respond to your other specific inputs, but will, when i get a better grasp on things. Talk to you all later.

Patrick


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