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All Southern Caldwell Objects (C80-C109)

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#51 cloudbuster

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 08:59 AM

Cr 249 (C100) is an open cluster with nebulosity, also called the “Running Chicken Nebula”. The cluster Collinder 249 is quite poor, with a few bright stars and it’s a bit bar-shaped. It’s easy to see the nebulosity IC 2948 curving around it in a boomerang or “Z” shape. At some parts the nebula is brighter and at other spots, darker zones appear. Clearly, this is much more a photographic object than a visual one. Just outside the sketch is the bright Lambda Centauri with the second part of nebulosity around it: IC 2944. Sketched with a 12" dobson @103x.

 

IC 2944.jpg

 

 

NGC 6744 (C101), the Pavo Galaxy proved to be a tough object, as is often the case with a face-on. It did not help seeing this object for the first time in my life and immediately having to draw it… This is a large galaxy and with a mottled appearance. The shape is slightly oval and the core is small, almond shaped and very bright. Five foreground stars could be seen on the face and two more near the edge. Spiral structure is seen, but it’s hard to see individual arms. I think I saw the N one (down in the sketch), but only because there is a dark zone between it and the core. On the S-side this is less obvious. This galaxy screams for larger aperture. Sketched with a 16″ Dieter Martini dobson @81x.

 

NGC 6744.jpg


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#52 BQ Octantis

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 09:18 AM

I had forgotten altogether that the Running Chicken was a Caldwell object! I have no memory of my observation of it through the 5-in, but I had many photographic run-ins with it. It wasn't easy with an unmodded DSLR, but I gave it some dedicated treatment in an AP project I called "The Great Southern Chook":

 

get.jpg?insecure

 

As to C101 (which I also had to shoot), with the exception of Carina and Omega Centauri (and possibly the Tarantula and the Southern Beehive) I pretty much felt all the Calwell objects screamed for more aperture than 5 inches! lol.gif That's why I soon pivoted to the camera. At least with the 16-in, you got some reasonable detail at the eyepiece.

 

BQ

 

Edit: I guess 47 Tuc was pretty good at 5-in, too…


Edited by BQ Octantis, 26 June 2022 - 09:37 AM.

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#53 mdowns

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 09:32 AM

Martijn,if I could give you a hundred likes for the content and arrangement of this thread,I would.So much fun for those of us north of the equator to see and read about.


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#54 cloudbuster

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Posted 29 June 2022 - 01:52 PM

IC 2602 (C102) – Southern Pleiades

 

Just below the richest part of the Milky Way, a loose cluster of stars can easily be seen with the naked eye, it's a collection of bright suns around the mag 2.6 star Theta Carinae. This is a very large cluster and therefore the Nagler 31T5 is used again just to be able to frame it completely. About 15 bright stars clearly stand out, apparently divided into two groups by a somewhat dark zone. The center star looks bluish. Furthermore, the field is mainly filled with many faint stars (which I have not drawn all). I find the comparison with the "northern" Pleiades a bit far-fetched, because "our" group is a bit brighter (very easy with the naked eye) and moreover there is no "haze" anywhere in IC 2602 (like the Merope Nebula). Actually, this cluster looks much better in a (large) bino  so I want to sketch it again when I return.

 

IC 2602.jpg

 

 

NGC 2070 (C103) – Tarantula Nebula

 

And then onto the Tarantula. What an amazing object that is… I've seen many nebulae pass by over the years, but none look as dramatic as this one, the image is even scares me a bit the first time I observe it... This is an object that is already quite close to the south celestial pole and is more of a winter object (or summer for the southern hemisphere), so it should be viewed right away at nightfall, only to find it at a mere 25 degrees height. Yet, it is already a simple naked eye object even then, just above the LMC. It actually resides in this galaxy and in a way it's incomprehensible that despite that fact it is so clearly visible and shows such an awful lot of detail! It is known to be the most massive HII region within our Local Group and if it were at the same distance as the Orion Nebula, it would occupy an area of ​​60 degrees in the sky… what more to say.

 

The 12” dobson is more than adequate to admire the many nebulous veils and the 7mm offers the possibility to see some more details in the center and still frame the complex well enough (outside this area patches of nebula are still visible, but they are already a lot less bright). An OIII filter makes the nebula stand out very well and at the same time dims the fainter stars a bit so that I don't feel like having to sketch an OC... Nevertheless, I spend the first evening placing only the dots, so that I have some nice anchor points on the second evening to "decorate" the nebula.

The attention is immediately drawn to the center. This is the brightest area and looks like a skull with open mouth and a sort of "tusk" on the left; the brightest part of the entire nebula. In the head, two dark zones can be seen as misshapen eye sockets and a bright central star can also be seen here. From the center there is a tangle of nebulous loops in a bit of a diamond shape with brighter zones at the corners of these. But even beyond this, the fog continues.

 

I have tried to the best of my abilities to indicate the difference in brightness between the different parts without exaggerating or making the object appear brighter/better than it really is. What you see is what you get… This object should certainly be considered in the same class as M42 and should (IMHO) absolutely be in the top-5 of most beautiful deep sky objects.

 

NGC 2070.jpg


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#55 cloudbuster

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Posted 29 June 2022 - 01:53 PM

And in high-res (or as much as possible within the limit of 500Kb):

 

click to enlarge

NGC 2070 1675.jpg


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#56 BQ Octantis

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Posted 29 June 2022 - 04:37 PM

Very nice!

 

I only studied the Southern Pleiades in detail through my 7x50s and 10x50s. While it was nice to resolve the patch of stars, I was never compelled to dwell on them with the scope or bother shooting them (whereas I shot the actual Pleiades in heavy light pollution low in the sky).

 

But the Tarantula Nebula…wow! To the unmodded DSLR, the OIII is more overpowering than the Trapezium zone of M42—it's cyan through-and-through. It's so bright, even a wide-field happy snap (at 8mm, or ~120˚ ) shows a cyan-hued diamond-shaped structure. I was so shocked to see a naked-eye nebula in another bloody galaxy, that I ventured to make a comparison of our two brightest Milky Way nebula if they were as far away as the Tarantula—they're tiny!:

 

post-273658-0-53858100-1569138171.jpg

 

While it was pointed out to me that there are much larger nebula in the Milky Way, all of those barely glow enough to pick up at all with an unmodded DSLR. In your example, the Tarantula would rival the moon in brightness just from the OIII!

 

BQ


Edited by BQ Octantis, 29 June 2022 - 04:38 PM.

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#57 cloudbuster

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Posted 02 July 2022 - 03:04 PM

NGC 104 (C106) is a real showpiece; 47 Tucanae is a giant globular cluster and very bright. It can already be seen with the naked eye, even slightly better than Omega Centauri, but through the telescope it is truly a piece of art.

 

Whereas a "normal" globular cluster is always somewhat confined, this one goes on and on almost to the edge of my 14mm (!) eyepiece in an ocean of ​​stars that slowly decrease in number towards the edge. At least a dozen bright star chains can be seen extending to far beyond the center. The core is also a bit odd; it is round, very bright and suddenly ends at a second, slightly less bright layer, a bit oval in shape. This makes the center resemble an eye. The globular cluster can be resolved into countless stars just outside the dense first core.

 

This is my new #1 globular cluster, incomparable to any other that I have ever seen. Sketched with a 16" Dieter Martini @129x

 

click to enlarge:

NGC 104 uitsnede.jpg


Edited by cloudbuster, 02 July 2022 - 03:05 PM.

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#58 BQ Octantis

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Posted 02 July 2022 - 04:19 PM

NGC 104 (C106) is a real showpiece; 47 Tucanae is a giant globular cluster and very bright. It can already be seen with the naked eye, even slightly better than Omega Centauri, but through the telescope it is truly a piece of art.

 

Beautifully done, mate! I ogled this one many times, including through my 7-in Mak. It was also my introduction to blue stragglers. At 5 inches of aperture and below, I never noticed them with the naked eye, but with the DSLR they're quite apparent. Did you notice any at the eyepiece?


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#59 bphaneuf

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Posted 02 July 2022 - 04:25 PM

Gorgeous rendering of 47 Tuc Martijn!  How long did it take you at the eyepiece to record stellar positions in this stunning image?

-b



#60 cloudbuster

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Posted 02 July 2022 - 05:17 PM

Thanks Butch! The sketch took a bit more than an hour I think. Globular clusters are usually faster to sketch than open clusters, simply because it's impossible to plot every single star... The positions (and brightness) of the brighter stars were of course immediately added, but most of the final (digital) result is based on the many notes that I take about size, brightness, condensation, shape, star chains etc.


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#61 cloudbuster

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Posted 03 July 2022 - 03:16 PM

BQ Octantis: sorry, I missed your question. But no, I did not pay attention to the blue stragglers that you mention. Interesting read though.

 

 

NGC 6101 (C107)

This is not a very large and rather weak globular cluster, but it is easy to see with direct vision. The shape is more triangular and the S-side (left in the sketch) is somewhat flattened. The texture of the globular cluster is grainy, and there are only a few stars to resolve. These run like a kind of "S" on the left side in the cluster, with a double star slightly above the core and a slightly darker pocket just under it. The brightness of the globular cluster is otherwise uniform.

 

 

NGC 6101.jpg


Edited by cloudbuster, 03 July 2022 - 03:18 PM.

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#62 bphaneuf

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Posted 03 July 2022 - 03:34 PM

Great description of your observation Martijn. Your sketch renders it perfectly.
-b
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#63 cloudbuster

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Posted 05 July 2022 - 06:33 AM

And here are the last two objects that I sketched. It has been a great journey passing through all the deepsky wonders of the southern sky.

Should you ever visit Namibia, then I can highly recommend staying at Rooisand Desert Ranch and using the telescopes from Deepskysafaris(.com). You will have the most amazing time for sure.

 

Thank you for reading this (long) topic smile.png

 

Martijn

 

 

NGC 4372 (C108) is not very bright, but a rather dim granulation can be seen. The brightness is evenly distributed among the glob and not much brighter in the center. There is a “hook” of 6 stars running through it with a bit darker zones in it. The underside of the cluster is more defined, but to the left (near a bright star) the granulation is more apparant. On the right side (under and up) some weak star chains are spotted, which make the cluster appear a bit pointy on that side.

 

NGC 4372.jpg

 

 

NGC 3195 (C109) is the final object on the Caldwell list and it's a nice planetary nebula. At first, nothing more is immediately seen than a somewhat oval, bright nebula. But prolonged observation starts to show a dark band, cutting the nebula in two halves. On both sides, two somewhat brighter area's can be seen just under the center. The resemblance with a coffee bean comes to mind.

 

NGC 3195 detail.jpg
 


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#64 BQ Octantis

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Posted 05 July 2022 - 03:44 PM

Well done, Martijn! Your attention to detail across the board was spectacular! Thanks for sharing…you brought back many happy memories.

 

Cheers,

 

BQ


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#65 mdowns

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Posted 05 July 2022 - 04:03 PM

Martijn,the observations you shared and the drawings you created from your Namibia trip ,within this thread are all quite exceptional.From your opening with ngc 5139 through to these last two,you've maintained an extremely high level of consistency.Very,very well done sir!

 

BTW,I love the obscure targets, like 4372!


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#66 cloudbuster

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Posted 06 July 2022 - 07:15 AM

Just noticed that I forgot all about Caldwell 104 and 105. Must be because I was so anxious to post 47 Tuc... (which is actually NGC 104 and not Caldwell 104) smile.png

 

So here they are to complete the topic:

 

 

At NGC 362 (C104) I wrote: textbook globular cluster. In other words, a globular cluster as you would expect it to be: bright, not too big, round, with a bright core and with a lot of resolvable stars without too much fuss around it. The globular cluster is compact, well defined and quite concentrated. The inner heart is not fully resolvable and the bright glow of a small nucleus can be seen. At the top I see a weak star chain (like a roof) and at the bottom right of the heap an "arm" of slightly brighter stars can be seen. Nice object.

 

NGC 362.jpg

 

 

NGC 4833 (C105) appears a bit odd and also quite dim; except for a core zone with blurred graininess there are more patches to be seen; the cluster is fragmented. Under the center there is a clear dark band. Left and above left there are separate zones of dim stars and a line of brighter stars is running through the cluster. Despite the soft appearance, this does seem to be quite a loose cluster which can be resolved well. The field around the glob is littered with stars.

 

NGC 4833.jpg

 


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#67 Warmvet

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Posted 08 July 2022 - 01:38 PM

Excellent thread and project!

 

Cindy


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