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All planets and the Moon visible at morning

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#1 artik

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Posted 13 June 2022 - 02:57 PM

I noticed that during next week virtually all Solar system objects will be visible in the morning.

 

solarsystem.jpeg

 

Mercury is high and gets around 10° alt around 5AM (from my location). Venus, Mars (also still too small only 7") are visible. Jupiter and Saturn will be around highest point (45° at may location). And of course Moon will appear between them.

 

Neptune and Uranus appear there as well (also for some reason Stellarium does not show Neptune)

 

How frequent such thing happens that all planets and Moon observable at same time?

 

 


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#2 BQ Octantis

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Posted 13 June 2022 - 03:11 PM

I saw that, too!

 

Not sure on the frequency, but I last witnessed this at dusk in December 1997.

 

BQ


Edited by BQ Octantis, 13 June 2022 - 05:44 PM.


#3 ascii

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Posted 13 June 2022 - 05:35 PM

I went out this morning to see the planets.  I have to drive a mile or so to get to a clear eastern horizon.  The Moon was not in the mix yet.  It was also probably a bit early for Mercury, but the weather forecast was promising.  Mercury was just on the very edge of naked-eye visibility but readily apparent in my 8x42 binoculars.

 

My next opportunities according to the local weather forecast are Friday and Saturday.

 

The other fun fact about this alignment is that the five naked-eye planets are arranged in the same order as their distance from the Sun.


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#4 ButterFly

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Posted 13 June 2022 - 07:46 PM

And Pluto.  Watch the Moon pass by each along the way.  it ends as a thin crescent.



#5 Craig Smith

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Posted 17 June 2022 - 11:46 AM

This is a pretty popular news item now.  I am brain-dead right now and wondering, does latitude make a difference in viewing this?  It seems that the closer you are to the tropic of cancer the higher in the sky they will be, and therefore in theory easier to see Mercury.  But maybe I'm way off, and even if this were correct the difference is likely negligible.



#6 Napp

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Posted 17 June 2022 - 11:55 AM

I went to the beach Thursday morning to catch this. I was able to see all the planets.  I used 15X70 binoculars to spot Uranus and Neptune.  


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#7 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 17 June 2022 - 01:04 PM

This is a pretty popular news item now.  I am brain-dead right now and wondering, does latitude make a difference in viewing this?  It seems that the closer you are to the tropic of cancer the higher in the sky they will be, and therefore in theory easier to see Mercury.  But maybe I'm way off, and even if this were correct the difference is likely negligible.

Yes, it does. Observers in the southern hemisphere will have a better view.



#8 Craig Smith

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Posted 17 June 2022 - 06:03 PM

I went to the beach Thursday morning to catch this. I was able to see all the planets.  I used 15X70 binoculars to spot Uranus and Neptune.  

I guess that's the best place to have a clear horizon!



#9 ButterFly

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Posted 17 June 2022 - 06:14 PM

This is a pretty popular news item now.  I am brain-dead right now and wondering, does latitude make a difference in viewing this?  It seems that the closer you are to the tropic of cancer the higher in the sky they will be, and therefore in theory easier to see Mercury.  But maybe I'm way off, and even if this were correct the difference is likely negligible.

It is near the June Solstice right now.  The ecliptic is pointing nearly straight up at sunrise near the equator.  At higher or lower latitudes, the ecliptic makes a steeper angle to the horizon.

 

It's easier to see than to think about.  Get Stellarium on your computer and show the ecliptic at sunrise.  Try New York, Bogota, and Sydney for North, Equator, and South.  Also see the angle the ecliptic makes with the horizon at noon, and sunset; then, do the same for an equinox, and the September solstice.

 

Other things that follow the ecliptic are zodiacal light.  From your location, what is the best time of year to see the zodiacal light at sunrise?  Is that different from the best time of year at sunset?


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#10 Achernar

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Posted 18 June 2022 - 06:38 AM

This is a rare occurrence for all the planets to be visible in the evening or before dawn at the same time. Not quite as rare as a total eclipse for any one spot on Earth, but rare enough that decades pass between events. The last time I remember this happening was in the late 1990's, and that was after sunset. I did not look at them with a telescope, just the unaided eye. And I do not recall any instances of all the planets known since antiquity strung out along the ecliptic in order from their distance from the Sun, until now. In fact, I just returned home from observing all of the planets plus the moon before sunrise with my 8-inch SCT. You should take this opportunity if you can, because in less than an hour I observed every one of them. In forty plus years stargazing, this is a big first for me to see them all with a telescope, AND see all the planets known since antiquity with the unaided eye too while in order with respect to their distance from the Sun. I doubt anyone living today will see a repeat of this under the exact same circumstances in their lifetime, with the possible exception of infants or young children. Mercury will be the hardest to see, but even with my aging eyes I had little trouble spotting it once I figured out where to look. If the skies are good tomorrow morning, I'd invite your family to see this for themselves if they are interested in astronomy as we are. There is no need to stay up all night, if you're an early riser just be set up by 4:00 or 4:30 a.m. local time and you'll be good to go. Clear skies.

 

Taras


Edited by Achernar, 18 June 2022 - 06:49 AM.

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#11 artik

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Posted 18 June 2022 - 07:24 AM

I observed today in the morning with my daughter. The weather was borderline. I found a part of the sky open at east such that at the place mercury should appear.

We observed moon jupiter Saturn Neptune mars and Venus.

Unfortunately clouds came and Mercury and Uranus remained hidden
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#12 Achernar

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Posted 18 June 2022 - 08:10 AM

I observed today in the morning with my daughter. The weather was borderline. I found a part of the sky open at east such that at the place mercury should appear.

We observed moon jupiter Saturn Neptune mars and Venus.

Unfortunately clouds came and Mercury and Uranus remained hidden

The same thing happened the last time I attempted to see all of the planets the previous weekend. Clouds suddenly closed in and that was the end of observing for the morning. Perhaps you'll have better luck tomorrow. I'm sure your daughter had a wonderful time observing with you. The good news is there will be opportunities to see all of them for a couple weeks into the future before Mercury is once again lost in the Sun's glare.

 

Taras


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#13 Craig Smith

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Posted 20 June 2022 - 01:46 PM

This is a rare occurrence for all the planets to be visible in the evening or before dawn at the same time. Not quite as rare as a total eclipse for any one spot on Earth, but rare enough that decades pass between events. The last time I remember this happening was in the late 1990's, and that was after sunset. I did not look at them with a telescope, just the unaided eye. And I do not recall any instances of all the planets known since antiquity strung out along the ecliptic in order from their distance from the Sun, until now. In fact, I just returned home from observing all of the planets plus the moon before sunrise with my 8-inch SCT. You should take this opportunity if you can, because in less than an hour I observed every one of them. In forty plus years stargazing, this is a big first for me to see them all with a telescope, AND see all the planets known since antiquity with the unaided eye too while in order with respect to their distance from the Sun. I doubt anyone living today will see a repeat of this under the exact same circumstances in their lifetime, with the possible exception of infants or young children. Mercury will be the hardest to see, but even with my aging eyes I had little trouble spotting it once I figured out where to look. If the skies are good tomorrow morning, I'd invite your family to see this for themselves if they are interested in astronomy as we are. There is no need to stay up all night, if you're an early riser just be set up by 4:00 or 4:30 a.m. local time and you'll be good to go. Clear skies.

 

Taras

Thanks, this encourages me to make the effort.  I tried this morning but was clouded out.  I may have to wait until Friday but so far the forecast is good.



#14 ButterFly

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Posted 20 June 2022 - 03:02 PM

I observed today in the morning with my daughter. The weather was borderline. I found a part of the sky open at east such that at the place mercury should appear.

We observed moon jupiter Saturn Neptune mars and Venus.

Unfortunately clouds came and Mercury and Uranus remained hidden

The best part of these events is watching them move around over several days.  Look up their distances and try to see them in the third dimension as well rather than mere projections on the celestial sphere.  The close ones move a lot faster.


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#15 Glades Cat

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Posted 21 June 2022 - 06:18 PM

I went out this morning before 5AM, set up my AT80ED and took a gander for 30 minutes at the planet lineup. It was super cool going from one to the other. The sky was clear, wind still, no clouds but the Miami suburbs are no the darkest skies. Didn’t see Uranus. Will try and spend some time with Mars tomorrow. I love watching Saturn and Jupiter, especially Saturn. The rings are just fascinating. A more powerful scope would be jaw dropping. 

Anyway, had a great time and will continue waking up early and enjoying the view...weather permitting.


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#16 Paradoxdb3

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Posted 22 June 2022 - 10:45 AM

Unfortunately, I can't see this alignment. I'll be able to see Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn with the naked eye, but once Mercury gets above the horizon, the sky will be a bright blue already. Even Jupiter will no longer be visible from my location, given the bright sky.
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#17 Tropobob

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Posted 23 June 2022 - 06:33 PM

I managed to view the big five and the Moon this morning. It is at the bottom of the attached image, just below the Hyades.  

 

Although Venus dominates the picture, I was also pleased at how well the Pleaides appeared. 

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • N108.JPG

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#18 BQ Octantis

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Posted 23 June 2022 - 07:19 PM

Bloody ripper catch, mate!


Edited by BQ Octantis, 23 June 2022 - 07:20 PM.


#19 DaveProsper

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 01:51 PM

Where I live in Northern News York State, the weather is usually pretty cloudy - but this morning it was crystal clear! I was able to see almost all of the planets and Moon, and even though I knew they would be stretched over a large portion of the sky I was impressed at the span! Sadly, I couldn't see Mercury, both due to increasing brightness and the fact that there are a lot of trees in my neighborhood, blocking that section of the sky. I will try again the next few mornings and maybe drive around just so i can catch the Messenger, too! Seeing a gorgeous alignment in the early 2000's was one of the things that surprised me to seriously stargaze so this is such a treat.


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#20 Napp

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 03:58 PM

I tried from home this morning instead of going to the beach.  I'm glad I didn't burn the gas.  There was a band of clouds along the northeastern horizon this morning just high enough to block my view of Mercury.  The rest of the naked eye planets and the moon were visible.  I didn't try for Uranus and Neptune as there was a thin layer of high clouds over the rest of the sky.  Very few stars shown through when the sky was still dark.



#21 BQ Octantis

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 04:16 PM

Well if I can get out of bed tomorrow…

 

screenshot.jpg

 

…the DC metro area has an added treat!

 

BQ

 



#22 BQ Octantis

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 05:52 AM

I set the alarm for 4:50, but I was awake at 4:20. It was a good thing, too—the spot I had scoped out had the eastern horizon obscured by trees. Given the dense tree lines of northern Virginia, I had to drive around for a bit to find somewhere with enough of a gap—which turned out to be a Lowe's parking lot. There was a cloud line behind from which Mercury made a few appearances.

 

I made a few captures with my Sigma 8mm. Saturn was out of the scene, so I had to compose a 2-panel panorama. After all that, I almost forgot about the ISS! Fortunately I remembered as I was packing up, so I captured a few 1 second trails.

 

Planetary Alignment w/ISS Trails

 

Now I can say I've seen two planetary alignments like this! cool.gif

 

Happy observing!

 

BQ


Edited by BQ Octantis, 25 June 2022 - 07:32 AM.


#23 laurelg9

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 12:46 PM

I will not get a chance to see this until at least Tuesday or Wednesday.  Weather, etc.  Will it still be viewable? How much will the moon take out in three days' time?


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#24 BQ Octantis

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 12:53 PM

The moon is only in the scene for one more morning, then it's new moon. But you probably have a few more days to glimpse Mercury—assuming your horizon is low enough…



#25 csphere.d

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 01:00 PM

I will not get a chance to see this until at least Tuesday or Wednesday.  Weather, etc.  Will it still be viewable? How much will the moon take out in three days' time?

The moon will be close to inferior conjunction (nearly new) by Tuesday, and will be hidden in the sun's glare. 

 

However, there is still time to catch elusive Mercury!  Venus will be in the morning sky for several weeks.  The outer planets will continue to gain altitude and be prime time evening targets this fall/winter!


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