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Using Filters to reduce Ha intensity in eyepiece ? Lunt 80T

Filters Solar Visual
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#1 Cliff99

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 10:22 PM

Took the plunge and bought a dedicated Solar scope to supplement the Combo Quark I have.

Now a proud owner of a mint used Lunt 80T with 1800 blocking filter, if a little poorer smile.gif

 

First use very impressive on Proms but find the disk too bright to dicern surface details clearly could be I have not adjusted the Pressure tuning accurately also still learning ;have reset it as per instructions , I peaked it for the Proms which show up really well.

 

Tried a single Polarising filter and also a Red filter on the eyepiece but didn't seem to make much difference. Very bright disk maybe a ND filter? Maybe a 7nm Ha filter any suggestions. I am sure once a camera is attached it won't be a problem but i like visual also.

 

Of course now its cloudy , new gear curse!

 

Cliff

 

 



#2 MalVeauX

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 10:38 PM

Hi,

 

Just use the Combo Quark with your Lunt 80. It's now a double stack. Tune them independently to be both on band as close as possible. This is superior to any ND/Polarizer/etc filter. You may need to use a telecentric with your Combo to get the best results, but it's still ideal compared to a visual filter like you've described.

 

Alternatively, sell the Quark Combo and just get the Lunt 80 double stack module and you're set for life.

 

Very best,


Edited by MalVeauX, 25 June 2022 - 10:40 PM.

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#3 Tom Masterson

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Posted 25 June 2022 - 11:48 PM

In the past I've used a light blue filter to drop the brightness on my h-alpha set-up. It's just a regular 82a eyepiece filter typically used for viewing the planets. If your scope is tuned right, you should be seeing surface detail. You won't get any improvement using a red filter, or even a h-alpha photographic filter. They may look dark to your eye, but they are still transmitting a high percentage of the red h-alpha light. The bonus to getting a light blue filter is, it will be usable for the planets. Mar opposition is coming this year and pale blue can help with the caps and any high clouds, plus they are fairly cheap.


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#4 Cliff99

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 12:30 AM

Hi,

 

Just use the Combo Quark with your Lunt 80. It's now a double stack. Tune them independently to be both on band as close as possible. This is superior to any ND/Polarizer/etc filter. You may need to use a telecentric with your Combo to get the best results, but it's still ideal compared to a visual filter like you've described.

 

Alternatively, sell the Quark Combo and just get the Lunt 80 double stack module and you're set for life.

 

Very best,

Thanks Marty,

 

I will try the Combo quark out with the Lunt; works great with my F7 SV110 scope and a 4X powermate.

The Double-stack Unit is very pricey.

 

When I get some clear skies I'll experiment some.

 

Appreciate the suggestions

Cliff



#5 Cliff99

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 12:36 AM

In the past I've used a light blue filter to drop the brightness on my h-alpha set-up. It's just a regular 82a eyepiece filter typically used for viewing the planets. If your scope is tuned right, you should be seeing surface detail. You won't get any improvement using a red filter, or even a h-alpha photographic filter. They may look dark to your eye, but they are still transmitting a high percentage of the red h-alpha light. The bonus to getting a light blue filter is, it will be usable for the planets. Mar opposition is coming this year and pale blue can help with the caps and any high clouds, plus they are fairly cheap.

Thanks Tom,

 

I have a light Blue and Dark Blue visual filters I got as a bundle a while back, will try them out also . Only picked up the scope yesterday but impressed so far. No heating and waiting like the Quark. Full disk is nice. 

 

Appreciate your ideas

Cliff


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#6 bigdob24

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 08:22 AM

I would think the view thru your 80 is similar to what the 100 produces, a very bright single stack view,  indeed.

‘Double Stacking would get you the best results and after doing that I don’t think you would view any other way, contrast and detail is so much better. 
If your main interest is visual be sure to add binos, they produce a great view with more detail and contrast .

 


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#7 MalVeauX

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 08:30 AM

Thanks Marty,

 

I will try the Combo quark out with the Lunt; works great with my F7 SV110 scope and a 4X powermate.

The Double-stack Unit is very pricey.

 

When I get some clear skies I'll experiment some.

 

Appreciate the suggestions

Cliff

Hi Cliff,

 

Sorry just noticed where you are.... indeed everything is ultra costly there, imported.

 

Here, a Combo Quark + Powermate is $1300+$350=$1650 USD.

 

The Lunt 80 DS module is $1800 USD directly from Lunt here in the States.

 

Anyhow, I realize now that the prices imported there are probably not this, maybe double or triple? Yikes. :(

 

Very best,



#8 Cliff99

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 05:18 PM

I would think the view thru your 80 is similar to what the 100 produces, a very bright single stack view,  indeed.

‘Double Stacking would get you the best results and after doing that I don’t think you would view any other way, contrast and detail is so much better. 
If your main interest is visual be sure to add binos, they produce a great view with more detail and contrast .

Yes double stacking looks like the way to go I'll try with the Quark , and the guy I bought the Lunt off gave me a pair of TS Binoviewers seems pretty solid , and a cheap set of 20mm plossils. Tried them briefly but had trouble getting the sweet spot and seemed the eye relief may be a bit long with those eyepieces. Early days.



#9 Cliff99

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Posted 26 June 2022 - 05:21 PM

Hi Cliff,

 

Sorry just noticed where you are.... indeed everything is ultra costly there, imported.

 

Here, a Combo Quark + Powermate is $1300+$350=$1650 USD.

 

The Lunt 80 DS module is $1800 USD directly from Lunt here in the States.

 

Anyhow, I realize now that the prices imported there are probably not this, maybe double or triple? Yikes. frown.gif

 

Very best,

Yep unfortunately the prices here with import duty + 10% GST and lousy exchange rate are getting a bit too high A$3000 for the DS module from a local supplier if he has them .Ouch!

The reason I try and buy used!

 

Cheers

Cliff



#10 BYoesle

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Posted 27 June 2022 - 12:29 AM

Everything filter-wise is pricy. Don't forget the obvious cool.gif

 

Sunglasses.jpg

 

P Zetner tuning SHG.jpg

Peter Zetner

 

Be sure you are tuned on-band; don't use prominences for tuning - use active area plage (brightest) and filaments (darkest). waytogo.gif

 

Without a telecentric your Combo Quark view probably won't have that much better absolute contrast, but it will be less bright, and that by itself will bring out more detail due to less saturation of the retina (sometimes I refer to passing thin clouds - and Ray-Bans - as faux double-stacking). Then again, Ray-Bans (or ND filters) are hopefully a little cheaper than etalons - and more reliable than clouds... foreheadslap.gif


Edited by BYoesle, 27 June 2022 - 12:49 AM.

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#11 Cliff99

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Posted 27 June 2022 - 10:31 PM

Everything filter-wise is pricy. Don't forget the obvious cool.gif

 

attachicon.gifSunglasses.jpg

 

attachicon.gifP Zetner tuning SHG.jpg

Peter Zetner

 

Be sure you are tuned on-band; don't use prominences for tuning - use active area plage (brightest) and filaments (darkest). waytogo.gif

 

Without a telecentric your Combo Quark view probably won't have that much better absolute contrast, but it will be less bright, and that by itself will bring out more detail due to less saturation of the retina (sometimes I refer to passing thin clouds - and Ray-Bans - as faux double-stacking). Then again, Ray-Bans (or ND filters) are hopefully a little cheaper than etalons - and more reliable than clouds... foreheadslap.gif

Thanks Peter,

 

I am getting used to tuning the Lunt but still learning. Proms just pop out the surface a little more subtle when I think its on tune. Used my 174mm camera on it yesterday for the first time and it was easier to tune watching the screen. First results here: I actually had more trouble imaging the proms, so easy visually ?

 

Sun in Ha Lunt LS80T 2022 06 26 2256
Proms with Lunt LS80T 27062022

 

Cliff


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#12 vincentv

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Posted 27 June 2022 - 11:09 PM

Tuning a single stack with a camera is easy peasy. Just observe the histogram, you'll be on band when the image is darkest.

Double stacked is whole 'nother story.


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#13 Cliff99

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Posted 27 June 2022 - 11:13 PM

Tuning a single stack with a camera is easy peasy. Just observe the histogram, you'll be on band when the image is darkest.

Double stacked is whole 'nother story.

Thanks, I'll try again when the clouds clear . 



#14 Highburymark

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Posted 28 June 2022 - 10:57 AM

It takes a while to work out how to get the best out of a new solar scope. Tuning and eyepieces are the obvious first priorities, but then the best way to improve surface detail is to get a head cover that blocks out all external light, and learning the best binoviewer set-up - with a head cover, for example, you don’t have to worry as much about eye relief. Experiment with different eyepieces - Plossls are fine. You’ll soon find a con I ation that works for you.
If you already have good surface detail, then I find two polarising filters on binoviewer eyepieces can marginally improve contrast - but it will not uncover or create new detail that’s not already clear.
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