Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Would a 28mm 1.4 be a good lens for milky way?

Beginner DSLR
  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 DanMiller

DanMiller

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 142
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2022
  • Loc: Pennsylvania, USA

Posted 26 June 2022 - 08:53 PM

I currently have 2 dslr cameras that I use. Canon eos Rebel t7 apc which I like using for lunar. And a Canon eos 6d Mark II full frame which I wanted to use for sky shots. My problem is, the only wide angle I have is a Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Lens. This is a apc lens, and I really can't use it on my 6d because even at 35mm, I still have to crop it because of it being an apc lens. I want to use the full frame camera just because it is better in low light. Well, at least that is what I have been told and have read.

 

Everything I have looked at to this point has just been out of my price range, but I just seen this lens that I think MIGHT fit my needs. And it is a Sigma, which even in my small amount of experience. I have found to be the best bang for the buck.  Sigma 28mm f/1.W4 DG HSM Art Lens

 

I am not even sure if I can take anything but the milky way with my dslr and the lenses I have. All though, I have a 600mm which I was hoping to use at least for planetary shots. BUT, because my knowledge is limited. This makes me hesitant in buying another lens.

 

If this is an inappropriate question, I am sorry. And I will delete the thread if it is.

 

Thank you in advance.

 

Dan Miller. 



#2 vidrazor

vidrazor

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,904
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2017
  • Loc: North Bergen, NJ

Posted 26 June 2022 - 10:57 PM

You don't reallly need a large sensor for wide field shots, especially when you have a fast lens. However most lenses will still need to be stopped down to get sharp edges. This is especially so with zooms. So just throw the Sigma on the T7 and have a go at it around f/2.8, which is still quite fast. If you're not gonna track, try ISO 400-800. If you're gonna stack 800 will be better. If you're gonna track but not stack, 200-400. If you're gonna track and stack, 800.


Edited by vidrazor, 26 June 2022 - 11:04 PM.

  • Sheridan and DanMiller like this

#3 Sheridan

Sheridan

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 888
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2005
  • Loc: Houston Tx.

Posted 26 June 2022 - 11:20 PM

Dan Just take it out and use it. I shoot both apc and ff so don't be afraid to experiment with your T7 and the sigma lens.
Unfortunately the cost anywhere below F 2.0 is body parts . If you can afford a signal lens for a full frame camera that might be an option. I use 2 lenses from Mitacon an 85 and a 135.
They are so manual that the camera doesn't even think it has a lens on it. For lenses longer than 50mm i would get a tracking mount like an IEXOS-100 pmc8.
Use what you have and have fun with it. Take a look at the Rokinon or Samyang 14mm. They are the same lens. Also I tend to buy used from BnH. I was told you can't get anything decent from a kit lens.
I call nonsense see attached. Bottom line is experiment, have fun, before going down the rabbit hole.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 2021-07-01-17-20-21.jpg

Edited by Sheridan, 26 June 2022 - 11:24 PM.

  • BPoletti likes this

#4 SpaceMax

SpaceMax

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 59
  • Joined: 19 Mar 2016

Posted 27 June 2022 - 03:58 AM

Hi Dan, is your question whether you need full frame for Milky Way and constellations? It helps a lot with attempting starscapes. But once you are in a tracker and shoot sky there is not much advantage.

As for the 28mm lens. 28 in a full frame is a middle of the road wide field of view but still pretty close to human vision. On a APS-C camera, 28mm is even narrower. Again, once you are in a tracker the f/stop becomes more negligible. If you plan on using clip in filters in the camera, then you are likely required to shoot f/4 or more anyways.

The 600mm lens would be a great choice for nebulae. Definitely not the best tool for planets. Planets need a few meters of fl.
  • DanMiller likes this

#5 Rgrenader

Rgrenader

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 7
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2022

Posted 27 June 2022 - 09:34 AM

I currently have 2 dslr cameras that I use. Canon eos Rebel t7 apc which I like using for lunar. And a Canon eos 6d Mark II full frame which I wanted to use for sky shots. My problem is, the only wide angle I have is a Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Lens. This is a apc lens, and I really can't use it on my 6d because even at 35mm, I still have to crop it because of it being an apc lens. I want to use the full frame camera just because it is better in low light. Well, at least that is what I have been told and have read.

 

Everything I have looked at to this point has just been out of my price range, but I just seen this lens that I think MIGHT fit my needs. And it is a Sigma, which even in my small amount of experience. I have found to be the best bang for the buck.  Sigma 28mm f/1.W4 DG HSM Art Lens

 

I am not even sure if I can take anything but the milky way with my dslr and the lenses I have. All though, I have a 600mm which I was hoping to use at least for planetary shots. BUT, because my knowledge is limited. This makes me hesitant in buying another lens.

 

If this is an inappropriate question, I am sorry. And I will delete the thread if it is.

 

Thank you in advance.

 

Dan Miller. 

I used a 24mm f1.4 Sigma ART on a Nikon D850 for years as a Milky Way imaging device.   The 28mm Art should give you excellent results.


  • DanMiller likes this

#6 DanMiller

DanMiller

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 142
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2022
  • Loc: Pennsylvania, USA

Posted 27 June 2022 - 12:26 PM

Dan Just take it out and use it. I shoot both apc and ff so don't be afraid to experiment with your T7 and the sigma lens.
Unfortunately the cost anywhere below F 2.0 is body parts . If you can afford a signal lens for a full frame camera that might be an option. I use 2 lenses from Mitacon an 85 and a 135.
They are so manual that the camera doesn't even think it has a lens on it. For lenses longer than 50mm i would get a tracking mount like an IEXOS-100 pmc8.
Use what you have and have fun with it. Take a look at the Rokinon or Samyang 14mm. They are the same lens. Also I tend to buy used from BnH. I was told you can't get anything decent from a kit lens.
I call nonsense see attached. Bottom line is experiment, have fun, before going down the rabbit hole.

Thank you.  The lens I listed is around 800 at b&h. Looked to see if they had anything used, but didn't see any. The apc lens I have is the only one I have specific for that camera, everything else is full frame.  I think I will take your advice and play with the t7 for a while first.

 

by the way,  love that picture of the lightening. I only have been out 1 time trying to capture that, and it was with the t7.  But, even with longer exposures I just didn't catch anything. The cover I had was next to buildings that blocked the shots and I just wasn't going to chance it with either the rain or the lightening in the open.  I will be back out for more attempts though.

 

Thank you again.



#7 DanMiller

DanMiller

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 142
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2022
  • Loc: Pennsylvania, USA

Posted 27 June 2022 - 12:31 PM

Hi Dan, is your question whether you need full frame for Milky Way and constellations? It helps a lot with attempting starscapes. But once you are in a tracker and shoot sky there is not much advantage.

As for the 28mm lens. 28 in a full frame is a middle of the road wide field of view but still pretty close to human vision. On a APS-C camera, 28mm is even narrower. Again, once you are in a tracker the f/stop becomes more negligible. If you plan on using clip in filters in the camera, then you are likely required to shoot f/4 or more anyways.

The 600mm lens would be a great choice for nebulae. Definitely not the best tool for planets. Planets need a few meters of fl.

Thank you. My 600 truthfully is my favorite lens right now, all though I have had some fun with the nifty 50 kit.  I'm glad you told me that it would be good for nebula, because that really something I wanted to capture also.  



#8 Iamhondo

Iamhondo

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 162
  • Joined: 09 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Salem, MO

Posted 27 June 2022 - 05:44 PM

There are a lot of good short lenses for your setup. I'm not keen on zooms. They're usually "just ok" at a bunch of different lengths. A good 24mm or 28mm can get some great wide images of parts of the Milky Way in a very short time. 14mm is a good length for some simple constellation mosaics. 50mm lenses can be nice too. I use some old Nikkor lenses with my Canon DSLRs (all APS-C) with a Nikon-f to EOS adapter.

Wide field imaging near/on the Milky Way has one great advantage: No trouble finding a guide star.



#9 DanMiller

DanMiller

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 142
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2022
  • Loc: Pennsylvania, USA

Posted 28 June 2022 - 07:46 PM

There are a lot of good short lenses for your setup. I'm not keen on zooms. They're usually "just ok" at a bunch of different lengths. A good 24mm or 28mm can get some great wide images of parts of the Milky Way in a very short time. 14mm is a good length for some simple constellation mosaics. 50mm lenses can be nice too. I use some old Nikkor lenses with my Canon DSLRs (all APS-C) with a Nikon-f to EOS adapter.

Wide field imaging near/on the Milky Way has one great advantage: No trouble finding a guide star.

I will be honest, I was thinking of trying my 50mm before I purchase anything. It may be a kit lens, but i was out with it taking pictures and it was crisp and vibrant. I wouldn't get the wide angle view, but with my full frame. I think I would get some really nice pictures. Thankfully I am always reading about various techniques of taking pictures, because I would never have given it a chance. 



#10 vidrazor

vidrazor

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,904
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2017
  • Loc: North Bergen, NJ

Posted 28 June 2022 - 09:22 PM

Why would you NOT use the 50? Doesn't matter that it's not a 24. ;)


  • Sheridan and DanMiller like this

#11 Sheridan

Sheridan

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 888
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2005
  • Loc: Houston Tx.

Posted 01 July 2022 - 11:28 AM

The Rokinon 14mm on my D5200 is more like a 21mm. Use the 50mm. There is a reason its called the nifty 50. As for the lightning, it was on the other side of the bay miles off. It's easy to do, just setup an intervalometer for say 45s and adjust your F-stop depending on the brightness. Just let it run. I think I settled in on F8 i started around F16. A couple of test shots will tell you. Remember safety first, give yourself plenty of distance between you and the storm.

String all the shots together and you have something like this.
https://youtu.be/6AY5cMIPJwc

I got this on on a ferry flight
https://youtu.be/udWoRozcOx4

Edited by Sheridan, 01 July 2022 - 11:31 AM.


#12 DanMiller

DanMiller

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 142
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2022
  • Loc: Pennsylvania, USA

Posted 02 July 2022 - 10:08 AM

The Rokinon 14mm on my D5200 is more like a 21mm. Use the 50mm. There is a reason its called the nifty 50. As for the lightning, it was on the other side of the bay miles off. It's easy to do, just setup an intervalometer for say 45s and adjust your F-stop depending on the brightness. Just let it run. I think I settled in on F8 i started around F16. A couple of test shots will tell you. Remember safety first, give yourself plenty of distance between you and the storm.

String all the shots together and you have something like this.
https://youtu.be/6AY5cMIPJwc

I got this on on a ferry flight
https://youtu.be/udWoRozcOx4

One of the reasons I have been using my full fame is because with time elapsed option on the camera itself. intervalometer?  And my rebel t7 doesn't, so I have been using the 6d more. But, because I do want the flexibility with both cameras. I just ordered a intervalometer for the t7.  It's summer in the mountains of pennsylvania(USA), so there should be enough thunder storms for me to try and capture. And now that I ordered the intervalometer for the T7, I think I will see how it does for other pictures than just the moon. Shoot, using the intervalometer on the T7 for the moon should give me better images for stacking.  Dang, I really am enjoying this forum for information and sugestions.



#13 Sheridan

Sheridan

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 888
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2005
  • Loc: Houston Tx.

Posted 02 July 2022 - 12:54 PM

Fun stuff


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Beginner, DSLR



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics