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My first EAA setup - C6 SCT, HEQ5, ASI294MC, and HyperStar

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#26 steveincolo

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 12:57 PM

I know, not one mention of SharpCap anywhere! It's definately not a book for EAA, but it did have a ton of great information about pre and post image processing. I had no idea how involved this was. 

 

Thank you, I bought it from a reputable website, so I won't be stuck with it. Good to know for the future. The only thing I know to check, is to visually make sure the sensor hasn't been mishandled. You don't want to ever touch the surface or clean them aggressively. 

 

Yeah, I couldn't find any examples of people showing off their images using a dualband with a monochrome. Maybe I can switch cameras while on a subject to capture monochrome and OSC to later integrate? 

Here are a few mono shots I took with C6 Hyperstar, IDAS NBZ, and ASI178MM.  You’ll get a magnificently larger FOV with the 1600MM. 

Portion of NGC 7000 (North America Nebula)

NGC 7000, Baja region
 
IC 1318 (Gamma Sadr region)
IC 1318
 
M27
M27 zoom

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#27 Jay120

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 08:48 PM

Nothing wrong with post-processing, but it is beyond the scope of the EAA Forum (no post-processing of images here). If you decide to dabble in post-processing, the AP imaging forums have lots of info on software and techniques. 

I feel the same way, I want to know what it really looks like, or as close as my eyes can perceive. 

 

I do use dualband filters from time to time with my mono camera, but the goal is not to separate bands with an additional RGB filter… rather to extract as much nebula signal from the sky background as possible, especially when the target is in the midst of a crowded star field (Milky way…), or in light polluted environments. That works pretty well, but it often cries for a color camera then.

I'm curious to see how much better the monochrome picks up detail. In a monochrome workflow, LRGB exposures are later integrated. OSC simplifies the process, but combining OSC and monochrome exposures could be worthwhile? The color resolution would be diminished, but I think there are ways to address that. 

 

I got the HEQ5 mount. Everything seems to be in working order. I noticed the hand controller has a female USB-A port. Nice, I was expecting a serial port or network jack. It was a breeze getting CdC working with the mount. I only needed the ASCOM platform installed. Maybe the EQMOD isn't needed anymore? I don't mind the hand controller in the mix. I actually found using it to be intuitive and convenient. 

 

I was hoping to give it a real polar alignment, but there is a thunderstorm at the moment, might not get outside tonight. That's fine, the camera arrives tomorrow anyway. Hoping for clear skies this weekend.

 

Question about guiding, why does everyone seem to prefer off-axis guiding? Wouldn't on-axis be easier? Is it a star thing? Sometimes it's not possible? And is an auto-guider necessary with plate solving? 

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#28 Jay120

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 08:53 PM

 

Here are a few mono shots I took with C6 Hyperstar, IDAS NBZ, and ASI178MM.  You’ll get a magnificently larger FOV with the 1600MM. 

Portion of NGC 7000 (North America Nebula)

 
 
IC 1318 (Gamma Sadr region)
 
 
M27
 

 

That's look great! Nice detail. I only hope I can pull off those kinds of results. 


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#29 GoFish

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 09:10 PM

An off axis guider sees the same picture as your imaging camera. You pick a star that’s “off axis” in that view and guide on it. 
 

Conventional guide scopes and guide cameras don’t necessarily see the same thing your imaging cam sees. This can cause problems if the guide scope is poorly aligned with the scope, or if flexure of the system makes small alignment shifts in the guide scope relative to the imaging train.
 

The main mirror movement (“flop”) due to gravity in SCT scopes is notorious for wrecking conventional guiding. 



#30 steveincolo

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Posted 04 August 2022 - 09:23 PM

I feel the same way, I want to know what it really looks like, or as close as my eyes can perceive. 

 

I'm curious to see how much better the monochrome picks up detail. In a monochrome workflow, LRGB exposures are later integrated. OSC simplifies the process, but combining OSC and monochrome exposures could be worthwhile? The color resolution would be diminished, but I think there are ways to address that. 

 

I got the HEQ5 mount. Everything seems to be in working order. I noticed the hand controller has a female USB-A port. Nice, I was expecting a serial port or network jack. It was a breeze getting CdC working with the mount. I only needed the ASCOM platform installed. Maybe the EQMOD isn't needed anymore? I don't mind the hand controller in the mix. I actually found using it to be intuitive and convenient. 

 

I was hoping to give it a real polar alignment, but there is a thunderstorm at the moment, might not get outside tonight. That's fine, the camera arrives tomorrow anyway. Hoping for clear skies this weekend.

 

Question about guiding, why does everyone seem to prefer off-axis guiding? Wouldn't on-axis be easier? Is it a star thing? Sometimes it's not possible? And is an auto-guider necessary with plate solving? 

An auto-guider is not necessary for platesolving (although the guidescope can be used for platesolving).  You typically use the main scope and camera for platesolving.



#31 Jay120

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Posted 06 August 2022 - 12:14 AM

The last few days have been a steep learning curve. The ZWO ASI1600MM-P, HyperStar, and Celestron Focus Motor arrived today. I struggled for a couple of hours getting it all working. Once you get the driver's sorted out ASCOM is great. Everything is working now, Stellarium can slew, NINA can control everything, PHD 2 is configured, and ASTAP is setup for plate solving. 

 

I picked up the licensed version of SharpCap. I think it's a small price to pay compared to everything else. The smart histogram is a cool feature. 

 

I'm not going to lie, it was a challenge getting this setup. I have a whole new respect for the EAA community. This stuff isn't exactly simple. 

 

Tomorrow the ASI294MC arrives. I plan on making it my primary camera. Once I get some good OSC images, then I'll try out the monochrome. 

 

Where are the clear skies? Somethings are out of my control.  

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

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  • PXL_20220806_033127125_Easy-Resize.com (1).jpg

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#32 alphatripleplus

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Posted 06 August 2022 - 07:26 AM

 

 

I'm not going to lie, it was a challenge getting this setup. I have a whole new respect for the EAA community. This stuff isn't exactly simple. 

 

 

You have certainly bitten off quite a bit with that set-up : Hyperstar/ NINA/ Stellarium/ SharpCap/ ASTAP/autofocus. Many of us start of with a simpler set-up that avoids some of the complexity. For example, short focus refractor, plus SharpCap and a GOTO mount are really all you need to get going. However, kudos to you for getting all the bits working in your set-up as a first timer!



#33 steveincolo

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Posted 06 August 2022 - 07:37 AM

The last few days have been a steep learning curve. The ZWO ASI1600MM-P, HyperStar, and Celestron Focus Motor arrived today. I struggled for a couple of hours getting it all working. Once you get the driver's sorted out ASCOM is great. Everything is working now, Stellarium can slew, NINA can control everything, PHD 2 is configured, and ASTAP is setup for plate solving. 

 

I picked up the licensed version of SharpCap. I think it's a small price to pay compared to everything else. The smart histogram is a cool feature. 

 

I'm not going to lie, it was a challenge getting this setup. I have a whole new respect for the EAA community. This stuff isn't exactly simple. 

 

Tomorrow the ASI294MC arrives. I plan on making it my primary camera. Once I get some good OSC images, then I'll try out the monochrome. 

 

Where are the clear skies? Somethings are out of my control.  

Congratulations!  The causal relationship between new equipment and cloudy skies is well documented on this site.

 

A few small recommendations.  The NINA three-point polar alignment plugin (which works in conjunction with ASTAP plate solving) is very nice.  NINA autofocus takes a little tweaking to set up; Patriot Astro has a good video on how to do it.  And, if your horizon is somewhat obstructed, a horizon file (see Patriot Astro again) is nice to have in conjunction with the NINA Sky Atlas.  



#34 Jay120

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Posted 06 August 2022 - 10:08 PM

You have certainly bitten off quite a bit with that set-up : Hyperstar/ NINA/ Stellarium/ SharpCap/ ASTAP/autofocus. Many of us start of with a simpler set-up that avoids some of the complexity. For example, short focus refractor, plus SharpCap and a GOTO mount are really all you need to get going. However, kudos to you for getting all the bits working in your set-up as a first timer!

No joke. For anyone who finds this thread and wants to follow this example. My first night under clear skies will start out without any focal reducers. It's important to maintain a working baseline that you can get back to. Once I get it dialed in, I'll build up from there. I'm a senior engineer and this stuff is right up my alley, but even I struggled with it. I've noticed a trend with the instructions provided. Most of it is terrible, if provided at all. Trouble-shooting skills are a requirement. 

 

 

Congratulations!  The causal relationship between new equipment and cloudy skies is well documented on this site.

 

A few small recommendations.  The NINA three-point polar alignment plugin (which works in conjunction with ASTAP plate solving) is very nice.  NINA autofocus takes a little tweaking to set up; Patriot Astro has a good video on how to do it.  And, if your horizon is somewhat obstructed, a horizon file (see Patriot Astro again) is nice to have in conjunction with the NINA Sky Atlas.  

Haha, yes, it does feel like there is causality between new equipment and cloudy skies. 

 

Thanks for the pointers. I've tried a lot of different EAA related software and I really like the layout of NINA, I'll checkout the autofocus pointers. That's going to be important. 

 

 

I'm joining my local astronomy club. They have public outreach events, like the Perseids next week. Not sure how popular it is but I'll bring my scope and go check it out. 

 

Still waiting for clear skies, sigh...


Edited by Jay120, 06 August 2022 - 10:09 PM.


#35 Jay120

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Posted 07 August 2022 - 04:36 PM

An off axis guider sees the same picture as your imaging camera. You pick a star that’s “off axis” in that view and guide on it. 
 

Conventional guide scopes and guide cameras don’t necessarily see the same thing your imaging cam sees. This can cause problems if the guide scope is poorly aligned with the scope, or if flexure of the system makes small alignment shifts in the guide scope relative to the imaging train.
 

The main mirror movement (“flop”) due to gravity in SCT scopes is notorious for wrecking conventional guiding. 

I keep coming back to this topic. I misunderstood what an "off axis guider" was. It finally registered that this isn't referring to just the guide scope, it's part of the imaging train where a guide scope would connect. Got it, thanks again. 

 

The C6 had its first light! I woke up at 2am this morning and I could see stars. I carried everything outside and slewed the scope to Jupiter and focused in on it. To keep things simple I wasn't using any focal reducers, however I couldn't quite get things into focus. After a 30 mins I decided to pack it up, I wanted to get back into bed, lol. 

 

This morning in hind sight I think I forgot to consider the back focus (what a confusing term) without the F/6.3 reducer in the equation. I assumed I could just remove it from the imaging train and things would still focus. 

 

If I want to use the camera in F/10 then I should use the 1.25" nose piece that came with the camera to connect through the visual back? I'm guessing the answer is yes. Obviously the camera system wants faster optics, but for family and friends I know they are going to want to see the planets. That's my only use case for using the camera without a focal reducer. 



#36 alphatripleplus

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Posted 07 August 2022 - 07:10 PM

 

 

If I want to use the camera in F/10 then I should use the 1.25" nose piece that came with the camera to connect through the visual back? I'm guessing the answer is yes. Obviously the camera system wants faster optics, but for family and friends I know they are going to want to see the planets. That's my only use case for using the camera without a focal reducer. 

Even at f/10 I try to use a threaded connection on my SCTs and not the 1.25inch nosepiece, which is a less secure connection. With a  SCT to T-adapter, and T-Thread chain you'll have less vignetting than with a 1.25inch nosepiece and a more secure threaded connection. Just my 2 cents.


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#37 reifheck

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Posted 08 August 2022 - 01:01 PM

 

Here are a few mono shots I took with C6 Hyperstar, IDAS NBZ, and ASI178MM.  You’ll get a magnificently larger FOV with the 1600MM. 

Portion of NGC 7000 (North America Nebula)

 
 
IC 1318 (Gamma Sadr region)
 
 
M27
 

 

Steve those are great shots waytogo.gif.

 

How are you dealing with all of this cloud cover in order to get those shots?

 

I'm down here in Denver. Every time  I get my equipment set up, the clouds come rolling in confused1.gif.

 

Just got my ASI533MC Pro and looking for some clear skies so send some my way lol.gif.

 

Reif


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#38 steveincolo

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Posted 08 August 2022 - 01:16 PM

Steve those are great shots waytogo.gif.

 

How are you dealing with all of this cloud cover in order to get those shots?

 

I'm down here in Denver. Every time  I get my equipment set up, the clouds come rolling in confused1.gif.

 

Just got my ASI533MC Pro and looking for some clear skies so send some my way lol.gif.

 

Reif

Without getting too far off topic, I use weather.gov to look for "clear" or "mostly clear" nights.  My main rig is set up under a Telegizmos cover so it's easy for me to take advantage of the recently rare clear nights.  


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#39 reifheck

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Posted 08 August 2022 - 01:18 PM

Without getting too far off topic, I use weather.gov to look for "clear" or "mostly clear" nights.  My main rig is set up under a Telegizmos cover so it's easy for me to take advantage of the recently rare clear nights.  

Thanks Steve waytogo.gif .

 

Not trying to go off topic.

 

Reif


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#40 Jay120

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 12:29 PM

Even at f/10 I try to use a threaded connection on my SCTs and not the 1.25inch nosepiece, which is a less secure connection. With a  SCT to T-adapter, and T-Thread chain you'll have less vignetting than with a 1.25inch nosepiece and a more secure threaded connection. Just my 2 cents.

I agree, it makes me nervous that stuff is going fall off using the diagonal. Not sure why it didn't focus the first time I threaded it on? I'll give it another try. I'm getting more familiar with everything. I might have had something else out of whack. 

 

I had to watch more than half a dozen videos on how to Polar Align my HEQ5. So many details, it's a little intimidating. I took it slow and followed every step, even if I knew it wasn't applicable. Like calibrating the polar scope. Unfortunately I don't have a clear view of Polaris from my back deck, it is visible from my yard, but I'd rather be on the deck for now. 

 

I used a Polar Alignment app on my phone to assist with getting the mount into the correct position. Carefully aligned true North and set my elevation. Once it was dark I performed a 2 star calibration, then used the polar alignment option through the hand controller. It allows you to use different stars to fine tune your polar alignment. The GoTo functionality finally worked properly! I'll need to run through the process a few more times before I have it down. 

 

I calibrated that useless little finder scope, never know when you might actually need it. 

 

We had mostly clear skies last night and I got to put everything through its paces. The ASI294MC arrived Friday along with the focus mask. I started out on F/10 and looked at Jupiter, then added the 2x Barlow. That was neat, I could clearly see cloud patterns and 3 of Jupiter's moons. 

 

Next I switched to F/6.3, which was a lot more friendly to work with. The imaging was a lot faster which was expected. I had no trouble getting things into a rough focus. Actually getting the focus near perfect is going to take some practice. 

 

Lastly I swapped out the secondary mirror and added the HyperStar. One word, wow! Imaging was lightning fast, I pointed at a dark part of the sky and watched the stars pop into view. Keeping the same alignment I swapped in the high speed narrowband filter and It was obvious that it was holding back the light pollution. It did require a little extra exposure time, but at F2 it's minimal. I was very impressed. This was the reason I picked the C6 SCT and I'm glad I did. It's laughable at how complex all of this is.

 

All and all, I'm pretty happy with everything. I think my expectations were accurate. I'm not quite ready to drive to a dark site, need a few more nights of practice at home. 

 

The images I have so far are not worth showing off. It's really just me calibrating and testing stuff out. Next step is to find out what's worth viewing in the Northern hemisphere this month. I'll have some images to shar soon. I'm happy to post more images of my scope, lol.  


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#41 steveincolo

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 12:47 PM

I agree, it makes me nervous that stuff is going fall off using the diagonal. Not sure why it didn't focus the first time I threaded it on? I'll give it another try. I'm getting more familiar with everything. I might have had something else out of whack. 

 

I had to watch more than half a dozen videos on how to Polar Align my HEQ5. So many details, it's a little intimidating. I took it slow and followed every step, even if I knew it wasn't applicable. Like calibrating the polar scope. Unfortunately I don't have a clear view of Polaris from my back deck, it is visible from my yard, but I'd rather be on the deck for now. 

 

I used a Polar Alignment app on my phone to assist with getting the mount into the correct position. Carefully aligned true North and set my elevation. Once it was dark I performed a 2 star calibration, then used the polar alignment option through the hand controller. It allows you to use different stars to fine tune your polar alignment. The GoTo functionality finally worked properly! I'll need to run through the process a few more times before I have it down. 

 

I calibrated that useless little finder scope, never know when you might actually need it. 

 

We had mostly clear skies last night and I got to put everything through its paces. The ASI294MC arrived Friday along with the focus mask. I started out on F/10 and looked at Jupiter, then added the 2x Barlow. That was neat, I could clearly see cloud patterns and 3 of Jupiter's moons. 

 

Next I switched to F/6.3, which was a lot more friendly to work with. The imaging was a lot faster which was expected. I had no trouble getting things into a rough focus. Actually getting the focus near perfect is going to take some practice. 

 

Lastly I swapped out the secondary mirror and added the HyperStar. One word, wow! Imaging was lightning fast, I pointed at a dark part of the sky and watched the stars pop into view. Keeping the same alignment I swapped in the high speed narrowband filter and It was obvious that it was holding back the light pollution. It did require a little extra exposure time, but at F2 it's minimal. I was very impressed. This was the reason I picked the C6 SCT and I'm glad I did. It's laughable at how complex all of this is.

 

All and all, I'm pretty happy with everything. I think my expectations were accurate. I'm not quite ready to drive to a dark site, need a few more nights of practice at home. 

 

The images I have so far are not worth showing off. It's really just me calibrating and testing stuff out. Next step is to find out what's worth viewing in the Northern hemisphere this month. I'll have some images to shar soon. I'm happy to post more images of my scope, lol.  

Good stuff!  With that 294MC, I think you’ll want to learn about calibration frames.  Note that you’ll usually need to do some slight refocusing when you add a filter to your optical train. 
 

I think you may find the camera-based polar alignment tools (e.g. SharpCap, NINA 3-point align) a lot easier to use. 


Edited by steveincolo, 09 August 2022 - 12:47 PM.

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#42 alphatripleplus

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 01:36 PM

 

I think you may find the camera-based polar alignment tools (e.g. SharpCap, NINA 3-point align) a lot easier to use. 

+1 on Steve's comments regarding camera based PA tools. For example, I use SharpCap and can be done with PA within an arcminute or two of the pole, in about 2-3minutes of time (and that includes a re-check).


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#43 dave85374

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 01:39 PM

Just look at M31 with your camera and you will see the need for calibration frames.  I have your camera and a HyperStar and couldn't get a photo of M31 without the calibration frames.  M31 is so bright all I got was a bug blob in the middle.  My flats were better with 5 sec exposures.  I tried real short exposures and they were not pleasing, then I tried 2 sec exposures which were nice but the 5 sec exposures were the best.



#44 BrentKnight

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 01:48 PM

I plan on swapping filters manually with a filter drawer. One of those fancy electronic filter wheels look tempting. I want to script the sequences, but I need to dial stuff in first, so the EFW can wait a bit, plus not a good fit for the HyperStar. 

 

I picked up the ZWO 1.25" LRGB filters along with a 2" to 1.25" adapter ring so I can use them in the 2" filter drawer. It would have been nice to get the 2" filters, but they will work fine with the camera sensors I'm using and it saved me a few bucks. 

 

At some point soon, I plan on being in bed while it runs it's routine. 

EAA means staying up with the rig and tweaking the knobs - especially with the typically shorter total exposures used for getting near real time captures.  The point being to make an observation with the camera instead of an eyepiece.

 

At least for me...being in bed while the rig captures data sounds too much like AP...


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#45 steveincolo

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 01:50 PM

I agree, it makes me nervous that stuff is going fall off using the diagonal. Not sure why it didn't focus the first time I threaded it on? I'll give it another try. I'm getting more familiar with everything. I might have had something else out of whack. 

 

I had to watch more than half a dozen videos on how to Polar Align my HEQ5. So many details, it's a little intimidating. I took it slow and followed every step, even if I knew it wasn't applicable. Like calibrating the polar scope. Unfortunately I don't have a clear view of Polaris from my back deck, it is visible from my yard, but I'd rather be on the deck for now. 

 

I used a Polar Alignment app on my phone to assist with getting the mount into the correct position. Carefully aligned true North and set my elevation. Once it was dark I performed a 2 star calibration, then used the polar alignment option through the hand controller. It allows you to use different stars to fine tune your polar alignment. The GoTo functionality finally worked properly! I'll need to run through the process a few more times before I have it down. 

 

I calibrated that useless little finder scope, never know when you might actually need it. 

 

We had mostly clear skies last night and I got to put everything through its paces. The ASI294MC arrived Friday along with the focus mask. I started out on F/10 and looked at Jupiter, then added the 2x Barlow. That was neat, I could clearly see cloud patterns and 3 of Jupiter's moons. 

 

Next I switched to F/6.3, which was a lot more friendly to work with. The imaging was a lot faster which was expected. I had no trouble getting things into a rough focus. Actually getting the focus near perfect is going to take some practice. 

 

Lastly I swapped out the secondary mirror and added the HyperStar. One word, wow! Imaging was lightning fast, I pointed at a dark part of the sky and watched the stars pop into view. Keeping the same alignment I swapped in the high speed narrowband filter and It was obvious that it was holding back the light pollution. It did require a little extra exposure time, but at F2 it's minimal. I was very impressed. This was the reason I picked the C6 SCT and I'm glad I did. It's laughable at how complex all of this is.

 

All and all, I'm pretty happy with everything. I think my expectations were accurate. I'm not quite ready to drive to a dark site, need a few more nights of practice at home. 

 

The images I have so far are not worth showing off. It's really just me calibrating and testing stuff out. Next step is to find out what's worth viewing in the Northern hemisphere this month. I'll have some images to shar soon. I'm happy to post more images of my scope, lol.  

Here are some recommendations.   With the Hyperstar and no filter: M31 and (a little later at night) M33.  With the Hyperstar and a narrowband filter:  NGC 7000 (North America nebula) and NGC 6960 etc. (Veil Nebula).  With the 0.63x reducer and a narrowband filter:  NGC 6888 (Crescent Nebula).  With 0.63x reducer only:  M13, M27, M57.  Those would be good starter objects.  



#46 Jay120

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 04:45 PM

Good stuff!  With that 294MC, I think you’ll want to learn about calibration frames.  Note that you’ll usually need to do some slight refocusing when you add a filter to your optical train. 
 

I think you may find the camera-based polar alignment tools (e.g. SharpCap, NINA 3-point align) a lot easier to use. 

I think that's a good suggestion. Why make things more difficult than they need to be. I think it's worth knowing how to polar align without my computer, but realistically how often is that going to happen, lol. 

 

Just look at M31 with your camera and you will see the need for calibration frames.  I have your camera and a HyperStar and couldn't get a photo of M31 without the calibration frames.  M31 is so bright all I got was a bug blob in the middle.  My flats were better with 5 sec exposures.  I tried real short exposures and they were not pleasing, then I tried 2 sec exposures which were nice but the 5 sec exposures were the best.

I'm ready to try and get a decent image of something, but that isn't going to happen without some work, I'll give it a try. 

 

EAA means staying up with the rig and tweaking the knobs - especially with the typically shorter total exposures used for getting near real time captures.  The point being to make an observation with the camera instead of an eyepiece.

 

At least for me...being in bed while the rig captures data sounds too much like AP...

Yeah I think I realized the automated sequences aren't going to happen right away. I do want to spend some time under the stars, but the idea of waking up to images that were carefully planned out is exciting too. However with the amount of rain we've been getting, no way I'm leaving it outside unattended right now.

 

Here are some recommendations.   With the Hyperstar and no filter: M31 and (a little later at night) M33.  With the Hyperstar and a narrowband filter:  NGC 7000 (North America nebula) and NGC 6960 etc. (Veil Nebula).  With the 0.63x reducer and a narrowband filter:  NGC 6888 (Crescent Nebula).  With 0.63x reducer only:  M13, M27, M57.  Those would be good starter objects.  

This is golden, thank you!


Edited by Jay120, 09 August 2022 - 04:46 PM.


#47 steveincolo

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 05:03 PM

 

 

This is golden, thank you!

If they're visible from your location, catch M8, M16, and M20, with and without the narrowband filter, while you still can this summer.  


Edited by steveincolo, 09 August 2022 - 05:03 PM.


#48 alphatripleplus

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Posted 09 August 2022 - 06:25 PM

 

 

Yeah I think I realized the automated sequences aren't going to happen right away. I do want to spend some time under the stars, but the idea of waking up to images that were carefully planned out is exciting too. However with the amount of rain we've been getting, no way I'm leaving it outside unattended right now.

 

 

If you want to collect images unattended while you are sleeping, you are definitely in AP territory. You'll find a lot of info in the AP forums on unattended overnight imaging sequences, but that topic is beyond the scope of the EAA forum.



#49 Jay120

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Posted Today, 02:22 PM



If you want to collect images unattended while you are sleeping, you are definitely in AP territory. You'll find a lot of info in the AP forums on unattended overnight imaging sequences, but that topic is beyond the scope of the EAA forum.

Last night I was going back and forth over this in my mind. Where does EAA stop and AP start? Is it exposure timing, or a combination of things?

 

 

I bagged my first nebula!. This is NGC 7000 or at least part of it. This is with the C6, HyperStar F/2 (300mm), ASI294MC, and NBZ UHS narrowband. 

 

I used SharpCap's smart histogram to measure and apply the recommended camera settings. It didn't produce the desired results. After an hour I couldn't get anything resembling a nebula to appear. The brightness setting was too low, but by the time I figured it out the dew shield was maxed out, and without a heater it can only do so much. 

 

I started getting aggressive with the gain setting towards the end of the night. Not the best result but not the worst either. 

 

38 stacked images using 20 second exposures. Total time about 12.6 minutes. I'll do better next time. 

 

gallery_415893_20705_2905134.jpg


Edited by Jay120, Today, 02:30 PM.


#50 alphatripleplus

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Posted Today, 03:51 PM

Last night I was going back and forth over this in my mind. Where does EAA stop and AP start? Is it exposure timing, or a combination of things?

 

 

 

On CN, the separation is post-processing: The pinned EAA Forum guidelines make the point that in the EAA Forum:

 

 

Please note that post-processing of EAA images is not allowed under any circumstances.

 

Currently, the EAA Forum on CN has no other restriction - except for an implied constraint on total exposure, since an EAA capture is done in one session rather than over multiple sessions. Without  the constraint on post-processing, the EAA Forum would most likely be absorbed into one or more of the AP forums, as there would be no meaningful way to distinguish them on CN. 

 

In reality, people often dabble in both EAA and AP. There's nothing wrong with that, and there are (separate) places for both on CN. 

 

If you have any further questions on the division between EAA and AP on CN, please contact the mod team, or search for one of the many topics over the years that have discussed that same question in this Forum. I'd rather not derail this topic with another discussion here. smile.gif




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