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Can you ID a Galaxy out past NGC 7015.

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#1 OregonSky

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 01:54 AM

Just before shutting down and packing it in the other night,  I was in the Neighborhood of NCG 7015 and thought I would take a look.   I'm new at Eaa and still gaining perspective of whats possible to view.     While not a great image , ( It is 203 Million Light Years out ) ,  I was pleased just to see it with my 6se.    I also see another galaxy visible out at about 1 o'clock.    I've tried to figure out its ID, Magnitude and distance but cant find anything about it with the tools and references I have. 
Can anyone help ID that galaxy  ?   

Its as big as I can make it and keep under 500k

 

 

NGC 7015 +1  6se  52 X 8sec - 416sec  -  303 gain - Cropped

NGC 7015+1_416s_203MLY Crop .Jpg

 

Thank You 



#2 EGregerson

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 02:27 AM

Hi; U can submit a .jpg to Astrometry.net 

 

 

*  This project is partially supported by the US National Science Foundation, the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Canadian National Science and Engineering Research Council.



#3 David Knisely

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 02:43 AM

The galaxy 5.1' arc to the west of NGC 7015 is MAC 2105+1124.  Megastar lists it at 0.6' x 0.1' arc with magnitude 16.0 and no other data on the object.  Clear skies to you.


Edited by David Knisely, 10 August 2022 - 02:45 AM.


#4 MartinMeredith

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 03:06 AM

Also known as PGC 1393258 in the LEDA galaxy database (listed at mag 16.5 there, most likely photographic rather than visual)

 

Aladin is good for initial ID, then its sister tool Simbad is great for finding out more details e.g. for the gx in question:

 

http://simbad.cds.un...t=SIMBAD search


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#5 Redbetter

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 04:14 AM

Also known as PGC 1393258 in the LEDA galaxy database (listed at mag 16.5 there, most likely photographic rather than visual)

 

Aladin is good for initial ID, then its sister tool Simbad is great for finding out more details e.g. for the gx in question:

 

http://simbad.cds.un...t=SIMBAD search

Yes, unfortunately it is just within a stripe of sky not covered by the SDSS-III survey, so no updated g & r photometry.  The 16.5 value is B mag with +/- 0.5 uncertainty.  Most likely the visual magnitude is something like 16.  The lack of of more precise photometry in the the area makes it difficult to estimate for lack of comparisons. 

 

When I observed it back in 2017 it was averted vision only, and I put it at 16+.  I was unable to discern the shape that night, just the presence of the galaxy.    


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#6 OregonSky

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 01:34 PM

Redbetter

 

I got that image as a last look just before a cloud bank began to invade.   I'm looking forward to trying again in better skies.

 

----------------

 

I went to SIMBAD  and found this page about PGC 1393258 :

 

http://ned.ipac.calt...wmap=4&corr_z=1

 

that led to

http://simbad.cds.un...t=SIMBAD search

 

that has a link to :

 

Data at NED - NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database : PGC 1393258

 

One of its details gives distance :

Hubble Distance (CMB) [Mpc]  --  195.99 +/- 13.72

 

I found a converter for Hubble Distance to Light Years  but , the result seems way out past what I even imagine possible.

It shows that 1 Hubble unit is approx 1 Billion Light Years.

Thus ...   195.99  =  195 Billion Light Years  ??    

Seems impossible.      Hard to believe. 



#7 Redbetter

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 02:32 PM

The units are Mpc = megaparcecs = 1 million parsecs, where 1 parsec is ~3.262 light years.  So the actual distance is approximately 639 million light years.  And that is the estimated light travel time from when the light was emitted.  The distance is greater now.



#8 OregonSky

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 08:54 PM

Thanks Again  -    639+  MLY  -   WOW ! 

So much to learn.  



#9 havasman

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Posted 10 August 2022 - 09:55 PM

There a several ways to track these down and Aladin goes deep. But the easiest for me is WIKISKY.ORG and it answers this question too by identifying PGC1393258.



#10 OregonSky

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Posted 11 August 2022 - 03:24 AM

havasman

 

Thank You Too.  

Saved all these tips.   I hope to use them often .   

Clear Skies coming for a week - I hope.   Getting my list together. 

 

My home view is East to Southwest and zenith.  Forrest blocks the rest.   Not sure how to tell what bortle I am but pretty dark.   A gradient chart i found says 4 to 5.       I have permission to use a mound out a few more miles that's darker yet.  

 

Hope to find a object I can see that's a billion Light Years out one day.

I never looked for things to view that way for the 30 years I spent at the eyepiece.   I knew the 100 pretty items I could see.  I was growing bored looking at galaxies that only appeared as an indistinct fuzzy spot just to get a check mark on a list.

 

Its a new universe !!

 

Thanks

MIKE in OREGON



#11 Starman1

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Posted 11 August 2022 - 05:41 PM

OK, try Galaxy Cluster Abell 2065 in Corona Borealis.

Member Galaxy PGC54876 has a V magnitude of 15.1

The cluster is at slightly over 1 billion light years.


Edited by Starman1, 11 August 2022 - 05:41 PM.


#12 David Knisely

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Posted 11 August 2022 - 11:05 PM

havasman

 

Thank You Too.  

Saved all these tips.   I hope to use them often .   

Clear Skies coming for a week - I hope.   Getting my list together. 

 

My home view is East to Southwest and zenith.  Forrest blocks the rest.   Not sure how to tell what bortle I am but pretty dark.   A gradient chart i found says 4 to 5.       I have permission to use a mound out a few more miles that's darker yet.  

 

Hope to find a object I can see that's a billion Light Years out one day.

I never looked for things to view that way for the 30 years I spent at the eyepiece.   I knew the 100 pretty items I could see.  I was growing bored looking at galaxies that only appeared as an indistinct fuzzy spot just to get a check mark on a list.

 

Its a new universe !!

 

Thanks

MIKE in OREGON

Well, if you want something that is fairly easy but still a long way off, try the quasar 3C-273 in Virgo next year.  It appears as magnitude 12.8 star and is 2.433 billion light years away.   Here is an eyepiece finder chart for it:

 

3C-273wide.jpg




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