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[Image] M31 Core during the full moon (feedback appreciated)

Astrophotography
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#1 Jsey

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Posted 13 August 2022 - 06:06 AM

Shot this image during the last two nights as I just couldn't let a clear night pass. The moon is very much present and I feel like a lot of details got lost. I was expecting to see more with 8 hours but also knew that the moon would be an issue.

 

Data:
Lum: 4h
RGB: 1h each totalt 3h
Ha: 1h
Total: 8h integration
ASI294MM, 200PDS, TSGPU CC, HEQ5-Pro, Optolong LRGB filter, Antlia 3nm Ha Filter, ASI120MM, OAG, EAF, EFW

 

M31 Core 8h during full moon

 

Constructive feedback is appreciated.


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#2 David Boulanger

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Posted 13 August 2022 - 08:13 AM

How long are the subs? I'm sure the moon is an issue. M31 is a little bit like M42 as it is hard not to blow out the core of the target.

#3 Jsey

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Posted 13 August 2022 - 08:44 AM

How long are the subs? I'm sure the moon is an issue. M31 is a little bit like M42 as it is hard not to blow out the core of the target.

Subs were at 120s for all the filters except Ha. According to the histogram I didn't blow anything out. Processing could have been done better to protect the core but I was itching to see the faint outer parts.



#4 Phil Sherman

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Posted 13 August 2022 - 10:46 AM

I suspect that the faint parts of M31 faded into the background, a direct effect of the full moon. Take and process an additional hour of luminance images with a 120 second exposure of whatever is located at the same altitude and azimuth as M31 was when you imaged it when the moon is below the horizon. Compare the average background level of the two luminance images to see how much brighter the background sky was at the full moon. Any parts of M31 that lie within the range between the brightness of the two background levels will have been lost during the full moon exposures.


Edited by Phil Sherman, 13 August 2022 - 10:46 AM.

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