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Observation log continued; IV

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#326 DSO Viewer AZ

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Posted 25 October 2022 - 08:00 AM

So on my most recent trip to my regular dark sky site, I was there to work. And work I did! Three hour drive to get there, then 8 hours straight. I had set up camp and my smaller scope as I was not really there for astronomy but rather site modification. As the sun went down and stars started to pop, I was exhausted and could not wait to go to bed. In fact I was so tired I skipped making dinner and just sat in my chair and enjoyed a beer. The sky was like glass, so clear, stars so steady it was nice to just sit and soak it in. Then I looked over to Jupiter and thought maybe I will have a quick look, after all, shame to waste such a wonderful sky. Needless to say it was stunning. Still thinking a nice nap would be more fun, I got up to call it a show, and glanced again at the Milky Way one last time before hitting the sack. It was so bright and full of such detail, it was rather breathtaking. Sitting on the table in front of me were my binoculars so I thought, why not give it a scan. And BAM!! So many things to take in. I suddenly felt a surge, and sat back at the scope. Using the binoculars finding something interesting then point the scope to get a better look. I could not stop. Back and forth from binos to scope, many targets I know I have seen before and many I’m not so sure. No tablet, no phone, no sky charts, just the sky, my binos and scope. I am not so good that I know each thing I was looking at, and quite frankly didn’t care. Just having a fabulous time enjoying the moment. Before I knew it I was moving to other parts of the sky doing the same thing. Then looked down at my watch and it was after 11pm. I had time warped 4 hours through the evening. How great! Having to get to work again when the sun came up, responsibility took over and I called it a show. As I laid down waiting for sleep to take over, I just could not get over how much fun I had. I have just sat at the scope before with no electronics, and have sat with binos with no electronics. But doing both at the same time was new to me. No star hopping required was a new approach. Such a great experience I just felt the need to share. I wonder if this was a common practice prior to all these super smart electronic gizmos? Does anyone else do this regularly?
Thanks for reading, clear skies!

Andrew


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#327 wizbang396

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Posted 25 October 2022 - 08:32 AM

I know how this must feel as I spend most of if not all of my time imaging.  BUT, there are times I will just go out and look arounde, with and without the scope, just to observe.  It reminds me of the "old days".  AND just how much observing is a joy.;  Thanks for your report.


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#328 radiofm74

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Posted 25 October 2022 - 03:58 PM

After taking a night off the night before last due to wind, cold and my tired condition, I decided to at least give it a go last night from the covered side deck. I had taken two weekdays off from work for the new moon and I wanted to get at least something out of that despite the gusty winds. After sunset, Jupiter was up by the side (east-facing) door, and I’ve also had a mind to go for the Sculptor Galaxy, NGC 253, that Jupiter was passing above. And Neptune was near Jupiter... But it was windy and I was still tired from the other night and hesitating to go out. GRS was out of position. The sky to the south looked washed out. Well, it got almost fully dark and I decided to heck with it, carry the 4" out and have a look at Jupiter before the deck roof got in the way. In the midst of setting up, the wife came home and I talked with her a while about work. Finally got all the way out and pointed up at Jupiter but just had one last look off the south end of the deck before settling in at the scope and…heck, that’s Sagittarius! I could see the Teapot tipped over on its side between trees. It was washed out in the light pollution, but my last chance at summer was about to slip into a tall stand of pines and then be lost to view.

 

Kicking myself for not getting out earlier, I quickly repositioned to the other side of the deck and did a quick tour through Sagittarius, catching a pale/washed-out Lagoon and Triffid before they went behind the pines (I could still make out the Butterfly OC from between the pine branches), then I got the big globular M22. This was all accompanied by a rapid switching in and out of filters and eyepieces while bent over my telescope as the only viewing angle meant that I had to move it to the far corner of the deck where there was a bunch of stuff lying around that prevented me from moving a chair into position. Spent some time on M22 and was eventually able to resolve a twinkling sparkle of stars. Never did see M28. Moved up to the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud M24 and saw one of the M16 or M17 nebulas, I’m not sure which but I think M16. I don’t actually know this area so well as conditions tend to be horrible low to the south, and this and hopefully again tonight is probably going to be my last chance at it for the year. Well, it was a completely unplanned scramble just jumping around from target to target. The sideways orientation of the Teapot was confusing too, especially as I couldn’t make out all the stars naked eye. Got hints of globs M54 and M70 in the low haze. And then it was basically gone, either completely in the muck or swallowed by the pines. Whew. 
 

Moved over to a more comfortably situated viewing spot (still on the deck, peering out southwards from under the deck roof while sheltering from the wind) and decided to go for the globular M75 in Capricornus. This one had been a challenge for me to first find last year, and aside from that initial "discovery" weekend, I’d never revisited it and had been meaning to kind of "re-confirm" it even though I’d had a solid sighting logged. Found it relatively easily and, yup, still not much to look at laugh.gif Anyway, one of my weaker loggings re-confirmed. 
 

The wife came out and I showed her Saturn, which was looking pretty good. She complained about the glare surrounding the planet in the eyepiece (ES82/4.7). Sorry, baby. If you want to contribute to a set of dedicated minimum glass planetary eyepieces and a tracking mount, we can eliminate that, lol. She went inside. (Don’t worry, I didn’t actually say that lol.gif )
 

Well, the wind, which had been predicted to drop off, wasn’t really letting up, but Capricornus was in position for the limited deck viewing angle. I decided I’d go get the Dob and set that up on the deck and have a look for M73 that I’d seen a few weeks ago in the refractor but hadn’t been 100% sure about. The star hop had said it should be it, but it’s just a couple of nondescript stars among a sky full of stars, so hard to say. Got the Dob and started on nearby globular M72 that had been a very big challenge for me. Now with the Dob and knowing the area very well from all my hunting in there over the past summer, I got on it soon enough. Nice. Then relearned my starhop for M73 and yep, that was it. The little grouping of 4 dim stars that I’d seen in the refractor a few weeks ago was now fully resolved and more distinct, clearly matching photos of M73. Fully confirmed. Well… there is the Saturn Nebula right by there that had so far eluded me. Consulted Stellarium, hopped over, and this time I saw it — quite distinctive and white, with the "anses" visible. I upped the magnification and put in an Oiii filter. Upped the magnification again and spent some time with it. The ring-like projections (anses) were there to see at times, other times it was more American football-shaped (like Saturn through binoculars), but I didn’t make out any detail within, at least not clearly. Reading up on it later, I should have stuck with no filter; I’d just assumed that since it was a planetary, Oiii would be suitable, but David Knisely lists it as better with UHC and that actually no filter is needed. Oh well. Maybe I’ll try it again tonight, conditions permitting. Pretty cool though.

 

Took about a 2 hour break which included a late dinner and then pulled myself back outside. Wind was still going strong, which was too bad as the sky was nice to the east and over the house, but washed out to the south (deck view). Main thing I was wanting to try for in the second session was the Sculptor Galaxy, and I got on it pretty quickly. My first sighting of it, I was surprised at how big it is. Went from a 14mm eyepiece to an 18mm to finally 30mm to get it all in. Very nice; one of the most distinctive galaxies I’ve seen. Spent a good amount of time with it, enjoying the view but also occasionally dipping away to hunt for the nearby globular NGC 288 (which I never did end up seeing). Anyway, the Sculptor aka Silver Coin Galaxy is a good one, for sure. Large, bright and with dust lanes adding detail. Definitely "Messier worthy" (if the Messier list were a true ‘greatest hits’ list, which of course it isn’t).

 

From there, well Neptune was right by Jupiter so I decided to hunt it down. I’ve tried for it a few times before and was always left with feeling "maybe" or "Huh?" I actually haven’t tried too many times though as my disappointment with Uranus upon seeing that for the first time definitely cooled my ardor for seeing for myself my favorite planet from the Voyager 2 flybys, Neptune. Well, this time with the Dob and Stellarium, plus a relatively easy star hop from Jupiter, there could be no doubt; it’s a blue dot. More star-like than the haziness of Uranus. I tried to convince myself I was seeing Triton next to the planet, but even I didn’t believe me. Checking with Stellarium, I confirmed that, as my wife likes to say, I must have a good imagination (i.e., no Triton).

 

The night was still relatively young (1:30 am) but the wind was still buffeting the back yard and I’d had my fill of narrow viewing angle deck viewing to the hazy south. Kind of a wasted new moon in terms of not staying out until the early morning, but I did get in a last look at Sagittarius, reconfirmed M75 and especially M73, got my first ever views of the Saturn Nebula and the Sculptor Galaxy and my first for sure view of Neptune (I had seen Neptune before, but was each time left wondering, "That’s it? That’s all? " Now I know, yup, that’s it"). Tonight I’ll set up at sunset and, if the clouds and haze cooperate, hopefully get in a last look at Sagittarius, this time in a better planned session. Wind’s still gusting, so it’s looking to be another deck special 

So you've seen the ansae of the Saturn Nebula and the Sculptor Galaxy! The Sculptor! This is treason of the highest order lol.gif

 

On my end of things, I can tell you all you wish to know about M33 grin.gif

 

Way to go Mr. DMT!


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#329 Cfeastside

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Posted 26 October 2022 - 12:58 PM

Monday night 10-24-22
Backyard B4/B5
Start time: around 830
End time: around 1100
Sqm: 20.80
Temps: low 40s to 32
Celestron C11 on CGX
EPs: TV Delites 11, 13, 18.2; TV Panoptics 22, 35, Parks Gold Plossl 15

Seeing:  below average to average.  Breezy at first then calmed down so did the seeing

 

Objects observed: 22
• NGC 6818 Little Gem Nebula
• M 71,NGC 6838
• NGC 225
• M 110,NGC 2052
• M38 Starfish Cluster
• M57 Ring Nebula
• k14
• NGC 457 Owl Cluster
• M31 Andromeda Galaxy
• NGC 869 Double Cluster
• M 39,NGC 7092
• M 52,NGC 7654
• Be 86
• NGC 6871
• M 103,NGC 581
• M33 Pinwheel Galaxy,Triangulum Galaxy
• NGC 7009 Saturn Nebula
• M 72,NGC 6981
• NGC 663,
• M 29,NGC 6913
• Tr 2
• M 30,NGC 7099
• Jupiter
• Saturn

 

Started the evening off by viewing Jupiter and the transiting GRS.  Really should be called the great orange spot though!  Unfortunately Jupiter at that time of night is positioned over the roof and not the best seeing.  So it was a bit turbulent but I did get moments where I could make out some “finer” detail around the GRS and the primary belts.  I could see a hint of color of what I believe are the north and south temperal belts.

 

I spent very little time on Saturn since the seeing wasn’t the greatest so moved on to DSO objects.

I was eager to try my new Dioptrx 1.0 on my Pano 35.  I don’t recall what I looked at first with it, but I spent some time hunting down open clusters in the cygnus (northern cross) and Cassiopeia.  I do remember the standouts in the 35 pano were the Owl Cluster and the Double Cluster.  Tack sharp stars and were very beautiful.  I was able to get most of the Double Cluster in the fov.

 

A very good evening!

 

Tuesday Night 10-25-22
Backyard B4/B5
Start time: around 0200
End time: around 0430
Sqm: 20.77
Temps: low 34 to 28
Celestron C9.25 on evolution mount
EPs: TV Delites  18.2; TV Panoptic 35, Parks Gold Plossl 15

 

Hadn’t planned on observing due to clouds earlier on which were forecasted.  Woke up around 1am and poof, they were gone.  So what the heck might as well get my first views of Orion and Mars in.

Even with a layer of reflectix on the 9.25, taking it from the house at 62* to outside at 34* produced some thermals.  That took awhile to settle down.  Mars was high over head but thermals were killing it.  So I put the pano 35 in along with the dioptrx and slewed over to M42.  Woa, what a spectacular sight to see in the 35 and pretty sharp stars!  I hung out here for most of the night.  I also put the 18.5 Delite with dioptrx in as well.  I think I liked the 35 with the overall view better!

I called it a night at 0430 with frozen feet.  Need to get some better insulated boots!


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#330 daveb2022

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Posted 26 October 2022 - 08:37 PM

Last night I set up a 4-inch refractor in my light polluted backyard slot of the sky. Temps ranged from the mid 60's and into the upper 40's. Luckily it was some of the best seeing I've had over the past couple of weeks.

 

Early on, once Saturn was finally in view, I found it was producing sharp images at the EP. Not the best I've seen in the past but very steady at times.

 

I was able to push the power up to 216X (that normally is reserved for splitting doubles) on some of the Messier objects and got pleasing results.

 

Globular clusters like M-13, M-92, M-2, and M-15 resolved better than normal at the higher powers. It's finally getting dark enough after dusk with the sun setting earlier each day to capture one of my favorites, the Wild Duck cluster. M-11 has been washed out over the neighbors roof during the last month but being the sun is setting earlier, & considering the last couple of nights have much cooler, the cluster resolved well at higher powers. Even captured M-26.

 

Planetary nebulae like NCG-7009, M-57, M-27, NGC-6826 and NGC-6543 were bright, with M-27 looking better with an O-III filter.

 

But Jupiter was really nice at 154X and possibly the best I've seen it. While not completely steady, the seeing was good enough to capture some impressive views from time to time. With such steady skies, I was able to compare my Nagler 3.5 to the Delos 3.5 and found the Delos won overall. Generally I stick with the 16, 5, 3.5, and 2.5 Nagler EP's because of their weight and being they're somewhat parfocal. But the Delos was a treat to use. A couple transitions across the FOV were completely steady and produced fantastic views. Around midnight, I spent at least an hour on Jupiter itself using the Delos.

 

Besides splitting doubles in sky I have access to, some of the better open clusters were a treat. Makes me want to get to a darker site or lug out some of the heavy ordnance. Too bad my backyard is so limited but it's all I got. At least I finally got some fairly clear and steady skies.

 

Espresso good, seeing good and cooperating weather...well it made for a memorable night.


Edited by daveb2022, 26 October 2022 - 08:37 PM.

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#331 therealdmt

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Posted 27 October 2022 - 09:46 AM

So you've seen the ansae of the Saturn Nebula and the Sculptor Galaxy! The Sculptor! This is treason of the highest order lol.gif

 

On my end of things, I can tell you all you wish to know about M33 grin.gif

 

Way to go Mr. DMT!

If it makes you feel any better, I borrowed the ‘ansae’ terminology from your Yucatán post grin.gif

 

As for the Sculptor Galaxy, I didn’t connect it with your use of its other name, the "Silver Coin Galaxy". There’s a couple of those "Silver _____" galaxies and I don’t end up remembering which one is which (use the NGC number, and then I’d be really lost). Anyway, if I had realized, I wouldn’t have described just how awesome it is in such detail wink.gif

 

Just kidding around. Anyway, it’s good to have something left on the table. Frustrating, yeah, but good in a way, too.

 

And…I did finally reel in the Triangulum Galaxy (observation posted here) a few weeks ago. Whew. Man, that was a long time coming. Next big one up for me will be M101, the famous Pinwheel Galaxy, which I haven’t been able to make out yet despite going over the area again and again. The Owl Nebula is another that’s eluded me. But the special frustration of not being able to make out the 2nd closest large galaxy will surely stand out for me for a long time to come, especially since it can be seen with binoculars or even naked eye from a dark enough site


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#332 BrentKnight

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Posted 27 October 2022 - 01:32 PM

If it makes you feel any better, I borrowed the ‘ansae’ terminology from your Yucatán post grin.gif

 

As for the Sculptor Galaxy, I didn’t connect it with your use of its other name, the "Silver Coin Galaxy". There’s a couple of those "Silver _____" galaxies and I don’t end up remembering which one is which (use the NGC number, and then I’d be really lost). Anyway, if I had realized, I wouldn’t have described just how awesome it is in such detail wink.gif

 

Just kidding around. Anyway, it’s good to have something left on the table. Frustrating, yeah, but good in a way, too.

 

And…I did finally reel in the Triangulum Galaxy (observation posted here) a few weeks ago. Whew. Man, that was a long time coming. Next big one up for me will be M101, the famous Pinwheel Galaxy, which I haven’t been able to make out yet despite going over the area again and again. The Owl Nebula is another that’s eluded me. But the special frustration of not being able to make out the 2nd closest large galaxy will surely stand out for me for a long time to come, especially since it can be seen with binoculars or even naked eye from a dark enough site

M101 is a worthy challenge though.  Once found I think you will be surprised by how big it is.  Lots of little details will pop into view...  You might actually try looking for it using a UHC filter as the HII regions might stand out a little more than the faint core.


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#333 TheChosen

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Posted 27 October 2022 - 04:32 PM

My first proper observation log entry.

 

Finally got myself the 8 inch DOB over the summer and I have been going through the targets recommended by the Turn Left at Orion. The summer was more a process of discovery of the night sky and equipment buying and tuning as well as some imaging of the planets, moon and the sun, but now that I am all set and properly equipped, it is time to do some serious visual observation and logging. After all, when I bought my telescope, I had decided I would be a 90% visual observation focused. I had already observed during the summer at least 1 or 2 of the main galaxies, nebulas and clusters but didn't keep a detailed log as I was too busy with learning the basics.

 

Location: Bortle 3.5. Central Europe.

Weather: 100% humidity with fog creeping in. Swimming in dew. First hour breaking clouds. Can't pick and choose my nights too much as my telescope is at our 'summer house' and we go there only few days per month.

 

  • Got the kids to sleep and at 23:00 I just missed Jupiter at its highest. Today's night I had decided will be focused on visual but I decided to take three fast captures with my cheap planetary astro cam as Jupiter is still around opposition and quite big. I have been dealing with some black dots because of dust on my cam the previous month and immediately there were two big black circles on the planet. At first I thought something has seriously broken but then it quickly became obvious.. double shadow transit!.. without even expecting it. I had not had the time to properly plan my observation, just a quick copy/paste of objects from the book (kids and all that have kept me busy during the day). Quickly finished the captures, put the laptop away and took out all my eyepieces (covered to protect from the dew). Seeing was pretty horrible anyway with even some clouds ruining it, but better something captured than nothing considering the shadow transits. Started with a 9mm with a 2x Barlow.. Visually it was awesome. Seeing the shadows of actual moons. Europa and Ganymede for that matter. I have to say, I would've spent a lot more time if it wasn't for the moonless night and some DSOs waiting for me. Jupiter is all nice and great, but I can observe it when the Moon is out and DSOs are washed away.
  • Pleiades - The Pleiades were quite high up in the sky and just had to be observed to 'warm me up'. Switched to my favorite eyepiece (40mm, 2inch, 72 AFOV) and there they were. The whole of the Pleiades, super bight and sharp in the lowest magnification the scope can handle. It is not very often that the visual observation is somewhat comparable to an astrophoto. Lots of minor stars I did not even knew existed as I remember only the main stars. There was even some hint of Nebulosity, or maybe it was the hazy air spreading the light from the stars. Either way, it looked glorious. Hardly a night of observation goes by without me having a look at the Pleiades.
  • NGC 869 & NGC 884 - They were visible as indicated with the naked eye between Perseus and Cassiopeia. Found them very fast in the 40mm, after only pointing the RDF in the 'patch' I could see with my naked eyes. They looked really nice and verifying on my phone it is indeed them, they looked only about half as bad as the astrophotos I found online. Not bad at all. I switched to the SVBony 21-7 zoom eyepiece (as I didn't want to waste too much time with fixed EPs (I have an entire 6,9,15,20 68FOV set) finding the optimal one. I have to say, there is something nice about zoom eyepieces in that they provide the illusion of traveling towards the object while the background goes darker and darker.. a feeling of going deeper and deeper into space towards the target. The AFOV at 21mm is only 40, pretty bad.. but it didn't bother me this time. 7mm is much better at about 57 degrees AFOV. Zoomed in and out and inspected the details of the clusters. The stars remained relatively bright and sharp all the way to 7mm - 180x.
  • NGC 663 - Found it fast in Cassopeia, which is my favorite constellation. Observed again at low power, 40mm and switched to the zoom for some deep space travel. Everything was nice, sharp and bright at all the magnifications from 29 to 180 but to be honest, nothing particularly impressed me by this cluster. Time to move on.
  • NGC 457 - Another target I had quickly copied from the book during the day. Found quickly something that looked like an airplane. Looked it up in Stellarium to verify I am on target. Sure enough. Apparently it is called the Dragonfly cluster. This must be the first time ever that a star pattern actually looks a lot like its name. What a nice find. The 40mm showed at least 15-20 stars that I enjoyed seeing 'from a distance'. Enjoyed the nice, bright and sharp view and went for the zoom to gain enjoy some spaceship flight towards the dragonfly and inspect the two main stars and some more details. 
  • Orion Nebula - At this point it was getting really late, I was actually going to go but Orion was hard to miss in the sky, it was just getting to about maybe 35-40 degrees high. It was not on my list. Fog was everywhere, my tables, boxes and the whole telescope was swimming in dew. The only thing that hadn't dewed yet was the primary mirror.. secondary was already gone with a milky film of fog on top of it. Anyway I said I will give it a try.. I've been waiting for Orion since the summer as pretty much everyone has heard about the famous Orion Nebula. I put my 40mm in, screwed the 2 inch UHC filter (cheap one for 40$ of Aliexpress) and gave it a try. Sure enough I could see the Nebula really nice, big and bright. Considering the absolutely abysmal conditions, I didn't expect to see anything.. much less a Nebula. Other Nebulas I had already observed took a lot more effort and better conditions. I managed even to snap some very crude photos of it on my cellphone with a 2sec exposition shutter. I can't wait until I get a look at it during the winter under a crisp, clear night.

All in all. Given the conditions, I had achieved a lot of the goals for the night. 3 hours of quality observation with many targets seen for the very first time. 


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#334 Nankins

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Posted 27 October 2022 - 06:26 PM

I was able to get my 10" out for an hour and a half yesterday evening. Astrospheric showed that the seeing and transparency would not be the best,
but I wanted to go out anyway. And the transparency was better than expected. I did not give my telescope enough time to cool down,
so of course when planet viewing I definitely had lots of uncertainty and thermals, and it fogged up towards the end.
But I decided to look at Jupiter twice, and was able to get glimpses of good seeing, especially the second time when it was higher in the sky and
I actually caught not only some of the thinner, narrower cloud bands but also a purplish hue from the clouds on one pole, and a nice orange from those
around that area. Very nice. Saturn, however, presented me with more moments of great seeing, and I was able to get a nice look at one of the major cloud bands,
plus the Cassini Division which once or twice showed stark and strong within the rings (though I saw it more times than that!). And at least two faint moons.

My only major DSO target for the night was the Veil Nebula. I had been able to view the Western Veil back in April, but ever since my attempts have
been foiled. Thanks to other members here, I was finally able to not only find it again, but also got a great look at the
Eastern Veil, which I saw for the first time. I first tried it unfiltered, but got foiled and could not find it ("I am in the right area,
where exactly is this thing?"). Then I put in my OIII filter that I was using on the telescope for the first time, panned a little to try and locate it,
and got a nice eyefull of gray filaments when the Eastern Veil popped into view! I spent around 20 minutes exploring the area,
panning up and down the Eastern Veil so as to see as much as possible, then moving over and doing the same to the Western Veil. The views
reminded me of a long pencil. And I also realized that I originally missed the Veil because I WAS ACTUALLY LOOKING RIGHT INTO THE MIDDLE
OF IT! That solved the issue. And I also think that as I panned inside of it I was able to catch some of the fainter filaments.

I finished the night up with a quick look at the Double Cluster (nice, but not look worthy yet), M31 (and M110 easily found too! But still not totally look
worthy, I have seen it incredibly well in binoculars), and by stumbling on NGC 457 (the Dragonfly Cluster) in Cassiopeia. This last
is a show worthy target, because it is large in the EP, looks like its name, stands out from the surrounding stars, and the "eyes" are gold and blue,
similar to Albireo. Definitely a nice surprise. I am going back out tomorrow night and letting a friend look through my telescope, so
hopefully we can revisit all of these great targets!
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#335 dave253

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Posted 28 October 2022 - 04:29 AM

I just saw one of the most amazing things in all my decades of astronomy!

 

 I had the 80mm trained on the crescent moon, with the 15LV producing 60x, nicely framing the disc with earthshine visible.

 

 I was waiting for the occultation of HR6193, a 6mag star in Ophiucus. Just before the occultation, a satellite whizzed straight across the disc!

 

 I consulted SS6 Pro, and the sat was Starlink 1738. Interesting, SS6 showed it missing the moon by a dozen or so arc minutes. 
 

Wow! I’d never seen that before. Since refurbishing the mount on the Vixen, it’s been out every clear night. 


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#336 therealdmt

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Posted 28 October 2022 - 07:48 AM

My first proper observation log entry.

 

Finally got myself the 8 inch DOB over the summer and I have been going through the targets recommended by the Turn Left at Orion. The summer was more a process of discovery of the night sky and equipment buying and tuning as well as some imaging of the planets, moon and the sun, but now that I am all set and properly equipped, it is time to do some serious visual observation and logging. After all, when I bought my telescope, I had decided I would be a 90% visual observation focused. I had already observed during the summer at least 1 or 2 of the main galaxies, nebulas and clusters but didn't keep a detailed log as I was too busy with learning the basics.

 

Location: Bortle 3.5. Central Europe.

Weather: 100% humidity with fog creeping in. Swimming in dew. First hour breaking clouds. Can't pick and choose my nights too much as my telescope is at our 'summer house' and we go there only few days per month.

 

  • Jupiter... double shadow transit!
  • Pleiades 
  • NGC 869 & NGC 884 
  • NGC 663
  • NGC 457 
  • Orion Nebula 

All in all. Given the conditions, I had achieved a lot of the goals for the night. 3 hours of quality observation with many targets seen for the very first time. 

Sounds like you’re off to a fine start! Great report, too


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#337 ETXer

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Posted 28 October 2022 - 10:09 AM

Last night (finally a clear one) was devoted solely to Jupiter as I'm trying to further refine my imaging during its close opposition. As Jupiter rose and peaked at 49 degrees, I had the best view I've ever seen with my  Celestar 8 Deluxe with relatively better seeing (though still not ideal) than had existed for a while.

 

I started off with a visual view with the 2x Barlow (classic Ultima SV-Series 2x) at 156x. The planet was mostly steady with all the Galilean moons lined up to one side. Both the North and South Equatorial Belts easily stood out, while the North-North Temperate Belt and North Polar Region provided a small amount of detail. A hint of blue in the Equatorial Zones was present.

 

I was encouraged with the improvement of seeing as the evening progressed and as Jupiter strode to its max elevation, I decided it was time to mount the camera, my modest ZWO ASI120MC. I have an ASI224MC on the way, but it won't arrive until Tuesday and next week's weather doesn't look reassuring, so last night was my chance and had to use what I had.

 

And at that point with perfect timing, the GRS began to come into view. It's pale hue made it barely visible, but over the course of the next hour it's visibility improved as it approached Jupiter's meridian.

 

Here's the best of the captures. In all, a very satisfying night with "The King!"


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#338 BrentKnight

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Posted 28 October 2022 - 10:28 AM

I can definitely see more color in the GRS in you image than through an eyepiece.  Very pale these nights.


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#339 ETXer

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Posted 28 October 2022 - 10:59 AM

I can definitely see more color in the GRS in you image than through an eyepiece.  Very pale these nights.

Thanks Brent, yes, I guess it's been steadily decreasing in size and color. I wasn't even sure I was seeing it at first! Next time I plan to try some filters (as soon as I can find them after my recent move) to enhance the contrast.


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#340 Nankins

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Posted 28 October 2022 - 09:12 PM

I just finished up another observing session with a friend who wanted to look through my telescope. Each target that I chose
definitely wowed her and I think she had a lot of fun. We started with the waxing crescent Moon, then moved on to Jupiter. Jupiter was still showing plenty of
detail and cloud bands, and also some of the smaller festoons. No GRS though. Saturn was next up, and everyone enjoyed the rings, and also one of the cloud bands. I
made sure to use different EPs, Barlowed and unBarlowed, especially on the Moon, so that we could get a good feel for the way magnification works.
Then we went to M22, which was surprisingly good and completely resolved to the core even in the Barlowed 30mm. Very nice.
We also looked at M13, which was very similar to M22 and resolved much the same way. M57 looked great without a filter, but when I put in the UHC filter
it lost some of its clarity and became a little blurry (I think the seeing was not quite the best, Saturn and Jupiter also had problems).
M27, however, looked great both filtered (UHC) and unfiltered. The UHC brought out more of the edges, as did using just the
Barlowed 30mm so that my friend could get a good feel for how large this nebula is.
We also stopped at M31, which was showing quite nicely and filled a good deal of the Barlowed 30mm EP. Very obvious.
Next was the Eastern and Western Veil, which we viewed both through the Barlowed and the unBarlowed 30 mm EP. Both showed up quite nicely
as long grey tendrils, especially the Eastern Veil. These were both seen with the OIII filter only. I had no luck unfiltered.
The Double Cluster was the next target, but only a quick look because we needed to end the session. It popped out really nice and clearly,
nearly filling the entire unBarlowed 30mm. And the Pleiades was the final stop, with all the main stars plus some
mostly filling the 30mm and looking very nice despite being in the light pollution. All in all, a great night and the scope did not fog up!

As a bonus, I saw three Orionids, and the last one was a huge bolide that we all watched cross most of the sky leaving a smoke trail,
with fragments breaking off and then it finally burned up. It was the largest one that any of us have ever seen, and was VERY orange.
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#341 therealdmt

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Posted 29 October 2022 - 07:57 AM

The ending night of the 4 days I took off from work around the new moon. I was pretty wiped out afterwards so just posting now, 3 days later.

 

Set up the Dob on the side deck facing south. By around sunset, the wind had finally died down, but I stayed with observing from the deck for the elevation. Down on the lawn, with a stone wall to the south, the Dob cannot get low targets, and my main objective for the session was to get in Sagittarius and possibly Scorpius before they’d get swallowed by the summer-eating pines on the adjacent lot. Unfortunately, with the dying wind came a return of the pre-weekend haze, leaving the sky a white-ish gray to the south. Nevertheless, I soon saw Antares twinkling like crazy in the gap between pines, and I set to work trying to find M4. That wasn’t happening (low transparency, not really dark yet). M80 was already behind a pine branch. Wasn’t really prepared for M62 or M19, and meanwhile Sagittarius was now slipping towards the pines…

 

Ok, abandoned Scorpius and went to M8 the Lagoon Nebula and M20 the Trifid. Transparency wasn’t great, so neither of them were very good. Tried various filters… moved on to the globular M28 which I’d missed the night before. It was decent; checked the nearby globular M22 — Ahh, that’s better. Spent some time with M22, resolving the stars within in averted vision. Very nice. Went up to the Small Sagittarius Starcloud, M24, which was reasonably impressive at first but gradually grew less distinct as it sunk into the muck, then the adjacent OC M18, then up to… okay, here I got confused. This is the area I don’t have 100% nailed as I’m typically much more interested in M8 and M20. Spent a lot of time going over the star hop. I found one nebula but wasn’t 100% sure which one it was, the Eagle or the Omega/Swan? The one I saw was quite distinct, especially filtered, but I wasn’t sure about where the other was; above it, or below? There seemed to be a number of semi-nebulous suspects. Finally, I decided to just stick with what I had, wondering if there was an omega there (or perhaps an eagle?), and then suddenly I saw it — a swan. Or, "The Swan", I should say. I’ve seen the M17 nebula before but had never discerned either of its namesake shapes, but now through a UHC and with it in the sideways/descending orientation and an "upside down" Dob view, there in my eyepiece was a [rightside up] white swan surrounded by a partial circle of stars. Quite fetching. I eventually did a quick little sketch so as to be able to verify it later, but it soon became obvious that it could be none other than the Swan Nebula. After a while, with my bearings now set, I resumed my search for M18 the Eagle Nebula and eventually found it. Almost no nebulosity was to be seen with M18 in the haze, regardless of filter used. Anyway, I have a much better handle on the whole area now and will be more prepared for it when it comes back around next year.

 

After that, I went to Saturn and then down the other side of Capricornus from the previous night’s session to visit an old standby, globular cluster M30. Then, there was one remaining object in the area that I’ve been wanting to see and it was coming below the deck roof at that point, so I moved on to looking for the Helix Nebula, which I eventually found. I’d been forewarned that it’s "larger than you would think", so I stuck with 2" eyepieces. That and an Oiii had me on it after a while of, frankly, fishing around — there wasn’t much to go by naked eye as the area was all washed out in gray. The Helix Nebula showed as a large circular gray patch, a mostly featureless opaque disk, though it did very briefly seem ring-like once. Spent some time with it, trying various filters, but as it sunk lower it became less distinct.

 

Stayed out until 11:00, when I had to go in to get ready for a worknight bedtime. Transparency/skyglow was finally improving, too, but oh well. Wrapped things up with Saturn, Jupiter (GRS) and a few double stars, finally ending at Eta Cass, a lovely white and orange pairing, and then with my gear halfway in, took a closing look at Pleiades through a finder, the sky finally a satisfying black behind it


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#342 Jehujones

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Posted 29 October 2022 - 01:00 PM

If it makes you feel any better, I borrowed the ‘ansae’ terminology from your Yucatán post grin.gif

 

As for the Sculptor Galaxy, I didn’t connect it with your use of its other name, the "Silver Coin Galaxy". There’s a couple of those "Silver _____" galaxies and I don’t end up remembering which one is which (use the NGC number, and then I’d be really lost). Anyway, if I had realized, I wouldn’t have described just how awesome it is in such detail wink.gif

 

Just kidding around. Anyway, it’s good to have something left on the table. Frustrating, yeah, but good in a way, too.

 

And…I did finally reel in the Triangulum Galaxy (observation posted here) a few weeks ago. Whew. Man, that was a long time coming. Next big one up for me will be M101, the famous Pinwheel Galaxy, which I haven’t been able to make out yet despite going over the area again and again. The Owl Nebula is another that’s eluded me. But the special frustration of not being able to make out the 2nd closest large galaxy will surely stand out for me for a long time to come, especially since it can be seen with binoculars or even naked eye from a dark enough site

Congrats on M33 and hope you get M101 soon. But that's what makes them so memorable and special. It took years to see M33 and M101 with my 10" and part of it was simply because I didn't realize what I was seeing, even though I knew how large they are. I remember that "Oh wow!" feeling of finally seeing them. It wasn't because the view was stunning, it was just that all of a sudden they jumped out from the background.


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#343 Cfeastside

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Posted 29 October 2022 - 01:59 PM

Sat morning 10-29-22
Backyard B4/B5
Start time: around 1245
End time: around 0300
Sqm: 20.86
Temps:  34F
Celestron C9.25 on evolution mount
EPs: TV Delites 11, 13, 18.2; TV Panoptics 22, 35

Seeing:  average. 

 

Jupiter
Mars
Orion Nebula
Owl Cluster
Bode's Nebulae
NGC 2129
M 35
Intergalactic Wanderer
NGC 2331
Cr 96

 

My normal viewing time was a no go due to cloud cover so I set my alarm for 0230.   As luck would have it I woke up at 1215 and took a peak out the window.  I saw Jupiter shining brightly above; no clouds!  I decided to get dressed and get to observing!  I had already set the scope up so it was chilled and ready to go. 

I fired up the mount and set starsense off on its auto alignment whilst I went back inside to make some hot chocolate.  Not so much for the cold, but I wanted the sugar to wake me up.

 

Heading back outside and the alignment completed I slewed over to Jupiter which was still pretty high in the sky.  Woah, some good detail was coming through the ep as well as the grs!  The seeing seemed pretty decent and my collimation was good so I was seeing some of the better views from this location.  I could make out both the equatorial belts as usual, but this time I was also seeing two thinner bands below the south equatorial belt.  I think these were the S and SS Temperal Belts.  Funny though I don’t recall seeing the N NN Temperal Belts.  I could see a distinction between the GRS and the equatorial belt.  A little bit of detail in the GRS.  At least it wasn’t a orange smudge like usual.  I couldn’t see detail in the equatorial belts though.  I was really stoked to see this much detail; It’s been awhile.  The other night I spent some time collimating while I had decent seeing and I think that helped.  I was able to use the 11mm Delite(204x) on Jupiter, but the 13mm Delite(173x) was a little better.  Getting fine focus was a little harder to do since the 9.25 bounces a lot more on the evolution mount vs my c11 with feathertouch on the cgx.  But it wasn’t too bad and focus was pretty crisp and easy to find.  As Jupiter was getting lower in the sky the seeing and thicker atmosphere was reducing the details to be had.

 

Next up I swung over to Mars which was nearing zenith.  Unfortunately, it and the Orion Nebula were over the roof which seemed to affect the seeing.  Mars was a bit turbulent and I couldn’t really make out any detail.  just an obvious dark irregular shape on its orange surface.  I think I saw the polar ice cap.  I was using the 13 Delite.  I’ve always had trouble with getting any decent views of mars an any of my scopes.  I think once it clears my roof and is west of the meridian, I think it will improve.  I think I’ll put more effort into it when I get the c11 back.

 

After mars I put the 18.2 Delite in and swung over to the Orion Nebula with the Dioptrx.  Impressive tighter view.  The stars in the trapezium were wavy though, which I believe was thermal currents emanating from my roof.  The last view of the night I went back to Orion with the 35 pano with the Dioptrx.  That was my favorite view of Orion.  The entire nebula was visible in the EP with pin point stars….breathtaking!

 

A couple stand outs from the evening:  M35 was gorgeous in the 35 pano and Dioptrx.  I don’t think I’ve ever looked at this open cluster before.  i made a mental note to remember this one for future observations.  I had started with the 18.2 Delite on it which filled the entire field.  but I think it looked best in the 35.  Admired that one for a bit I did.

 

The other standout was the Owl Cluster in the 35 pano and Dioptrx.  Stunning display and amazing how much it does in fact look like an owl; with those two blazing stars for eyes!  Magnificent!

 

Ive don EAA on the Intergalactic Wanderer but had never looked at it through an ep before last night.  It was pretty dim.  I’ll have to revisit it with the c11 when I get the cgx back.

 

I was really happy to get this session in especially with Jupiter and the grs providing such good views, at least for what I’m accustomed to seeing.  I’m missing my c11 and can’t wait to get my cgx back so I can use it!

Hopefully the clouds won’t be too bad tonight or tomorrow as next week will be stormy and I’m hoping to get a few more nights in before that.  Its been good getting some time in at the ep!  Til next time….clear skies!

 

Mars edit: i’m thinking i saw atmospheric clouds instead of the polar ice cap. It was too large and looks like what ive seen online today for the atmospheric cloud.  


Edited by Cfeastside, 29 October 2022 - 06:15 PM.

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#344 Moonlit

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Posted 29 October 2022 - 06:36 PM

Saturday eve at the cabin alone for one night, it's the first night I've actually been able to use the new 2" diagonal as last time was very dewy. Having no diagonal for the 32mm EP on a refractor is frustrating, and it meant I couldn't use the 2" UHC filter on my 1.25" EPs either. Until now!

 

 

I'd made a list of nebulas to try out with the 120mm f/8 scope, and I got them all (almost)! With a 4.5" scope I didn't expect to see much nebulosity but I saw more than I had expected!

 

The Pacman Nebula, NGC 281, actually looked like Pacman this time! My previous attempt with a 20mm and no filter didn't go that well.

Tried M97(Owl neb) first and saw just a blob, but I realized I could see the Surfboard Galaxy (M108) at the same time, letting me see which way the surfboard was surfing tonight.

 

When I was just looking around with naked eyes for a change I noticed a light as bright as the brightest stars near Tania Borealis that was moving slowly to the left! 2-3 seconds after I spotted it it dimmed quickly, leaving a field of light around it. Perhaps a disintegrating meteor? I reported it on our national meteor site, but they haven't made a note of anything happening at the time (20:58 +0200) yet: http://norskmeteornettverk.no/meteor/

 

On to the California Nebula which yielded nothing, then M101 The Pinwheel Galaxy. I could easily tell it was there, and I also got a whiff of nearby NGC5474. 

 

After a break for warming myself and the optics, I tried the Ring Nebula. Wow! Switching to a 9mm EP it was clearly a ring with a dimmer middle, and I think this was the highlight of the evening. It hasn't got any bright stars near so it really stands out.

The Dumbbell neb, M27 next. Putting in the UHC I could discern the symmetric shape of it against my expectation and I can't wait to see it with bigger aperture. 

 

I was getting cold again so finished off with the Crab nebula which was just a blob, before returning to a star I love, Aldebaran.

Something about the brightness and color of it makes it appear to have spikes that change amplitude and direction if I move my eye slightly off the center of the focus point and that view always gets me. 
 


Edited by Moonlit, 29 October 2022 - 06:40 PM.

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#345 therealdmt

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Posted 30 October 2022 - 12:25 AM

Congrats on M33 and hope you get M101 soon

Thanks smile.gif

 

 

I remember that "Oh wow!" feeling of finally seeing them. It wasn't because the view was stunning, it was just that all of a sudden they jumped out from the background.

Yeah, that’s it exactly (well, I can’t speak to M101 yet grin.gif  But for for M33, that was it exactly)


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#346 jc482p

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Posted 30 October 2022 - 10:43 AM

Scope: 120mm F/7.5 Skywatcher 120 ED

Eyepieces: 32mm Plossl (28x), 18.2mm TV Delite (49x), Meade 5.5mm UWA (163x), BST Starguider 4.5mm (200x)

 

2022-10-28

6:06-6:16am, 18.84 sqm, 43 degrees, average transparency, below average seeing, clear, occasional light wind

Mars - At 200x, it was a yellow orange disc, a bit gibbous to the SE, and a bright yellow edge to the NNW.  The only standout features that I could see were dark markings on the left half of the disc.  Looking it up from https://www.shallowsky.com/marsmap/ these were Meridiana, Sabaeus, and Syrtis Major, going N to S.  By the way, to me the shallowsky.com Mars map view seems more rotated to show the south pole than what I saw in my telescope view.  The SkySafari Mars map view looks more accurate, but is hard to select and find out individual places on that map using my fat fingers.

 

2022-10-29

5:28-6:20am, 19.00 sqm, 38 degrees, avg transp, avg seeing, clear

It was the first viewing session this fall where the temperature was below 40 degrees.  Hands were getting numb towards the end of this session.

Mars - At 163x, it was still the same slightly gibbous yellow orange disc.  But now the dark features were shifted from the left more towards the middle of the disc.  Looking it up later, this was because Syrtis Major moved up from the S to be closer to the middle of the disc.  There was another dark feature, smaller, to the NE.  I also compared the 163x view with the 82 degree Meade UWA to the 200x view with the 58 degrees BST Starguider.  With the 82 degree eyepiece, it took a full two minutes for Mars to cross the FOV, while it took just one minute with the 58 degree eyepiece.  So it would seem that the Meade UWA is more favorable with my alt-az mount setup, except that I found it was easier to make out dark features on the disc with the BST because the disc was not as bright with it.

Messier M79 - globular cluster.  At 28x and 49x, I couldn't see a thing.  At 163x, I could see a dim fuzzy star and with averted vision I could see it was the center of a globular-cluster shaped mottling of the sky.

Messier M41 - open cluster.  At 28x, there was a broad band of 12 brighter stars going across the middle of the FOV and 7 more stars all around the FOV.  With the dimmer ones, there were 40 stars total.  At 49x, 50 stars.

 

2022-10-30

5:28-6:00am, 18.99 sqm, 37 degrees, excellent transp, above avg seeing, clear

I can't remember any previous time when Astrospheric said my viewing location had excellent transparency.  It felt as cold as it was the day before.  Eventually I'll get used to the cold, but not this time.

Mars - At 163x, again it was a slightly gibbous yellow orange disc, with dark markings on it.  This time, the dark markings looked like a Texas Longhorn covering most of the disc with its head at the middle bottom of the disc.  Meridiana and Sabaeus was the left horn and the head was Syrtis Major.  I'm not sure what the right horn was.

Messier M42 - Orion Nebula.  At 28x, I could clearly see four stars in Trapezium already, maybe courtesy of the excellent transparency.  So I thought I would have a chance to see the E and F stars at higher magnifications.  I tried 163x and 200x.  Nope, though the A star was looking bulgy.  The nebula looked more like a clearly defined cloud (lowercase U-shaped) in the Meade UWA (163x), and more like a mist with the other eyepieces.


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#347 Jehujones

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Posted 30 October 2022 - 01:59 PM

On a whim we went for a drive yesterday evening and decided to go to Chuchupate. It was already late evening and after stopping to eat, the darkness beat us there. I didn't want to drive in with headlights so we pulled over in a turnout just past the Ranger's Station. No equipment, just four eyes. The air was cooling down pretty quick and thankfully we had some light jackets in the car. Transparency seemed pretty good with an occasional little cloud here or there. The seeing probably wasn't too great for the gang up the road since there was some twinkle visible and the random little clouds were being pushed away fairly quickly. M31 was visible after only a few minutes outside the car. After half an hour we could tell the light dome to the southeast was keeping us from fully adapting so we avoided facing that direction. From our location the moon was behind the mountain but still up. The Milky Way was a welcome sight but by no means would I call it bright, let's just say it was obvious. By the time we were ready to leave I had found several open clusters including the Coathanger which happens to be a personal favorite. Not exactly a "Log Entry" but anytime I'm under the stars with my wife is worth sharing. grin.gif


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#348 WheezyGod

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Posted 31 October 2022 - 08:27 AM

My wife and I went hiking up one of the white mountains on this past Saturday and had great weather day and night.

I got to the Kancamagus Highway spot at around 8:30pm on Saturday and saw several red lights whose owners night vision I likely destroyed passing by. I brought along my wife who was happy to see other people this remote given the other places we’ve gone that have had no one. I thought it would be cool if there was another person observing and had gotten more than I had hoped for in a good way.

I took out my AD10 and was greeted by one of the guys who explained that they’re each at the site independently. I checked out M15 first which was a bit disappointing because I probably wasn’t waiting long enough for my scope’s temp to acclimate. The Veil, Andromeda, and ring nebula looked nice at lower power.

I went over to a guy who had a C8 who was showing a few people different objects. Turns out he was a local, as were his buddies who were observing for the first time. Looked at a bunch of objects through his scope like the double cluster, dumbbell nebula, Saturn, and a few I already looked through. Went over to one of the two guys doing photography to see a pretty nice looking 5in refractor on a triplet that was photographing Andromeda along with another AP scope. He definitely was a true AP believer who had skepticism doing visual by explaining you can’t see M31 very well visually. Even when I explained that I’d be able to see the horse head nebula with night vision he stuck to his AP guns as if he was trying to convert me to AP. Another guy next to him who I didn’t get a chance to talk to was also doing AP.

Unfortunately my visit was cut short by the wife who was tired from our long hike before. I missed being able to checkout some objects with my own scope but had at least seen most of the ones I wanted to with my scope or the other guy’s C8.

Anyone else whose visited this site have other observers show up? It felt like an unexpected mini star party.
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#349 monolithic

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Posted 31 October 2022 - 10:10 AM

So, it's Friday Night, and the forecast is clear. Of course, I wheel my 10" Dobsonian out the door. I was fortunate to have a night of what seems to be extraordinary transparency -- Zeus smashed my expectations for a night of Bortle 7 observing. The objects I observed are: M101, M31 and co., M33, NGC 604, and Jupiter.

M101 - I had joked about trying to view this from home after I confirmed the Horsehead at my Bortle 4 site. I tried it on Friday night, expecting nothing, the galaxy a whopping 16 degrees off the horizon, and... I got it. It wasn't much at all, and it was quite difficult to detect, but Messier 101 was right where it was supposed to be. I glimpsed it multiple times in two eyepieces. It was almost comedic, and probably a miracle; I don't think I'll be able to duplicate this.

M31, M32, M110 - After observing at B4 I now had a good idea of what to look for, and with time I was able to detect M31's two main dust lanes. This was not trivial, but it was doable. The satellite galaxies were interesting: M32 was a bright ball of light, and M110's stellar core was detectable with direct vision. The view was a far cry from B4, of course, but still alright.

M33 - My 'Little Andromeda' asterism is always helpful in finding this galaxy. There wasn't much there, but the core was quickly spotted and with some time the general orientation of the galaxy was apparent. Eventually I detected something near the foot of my asterism, and I had to Google it to confirm what I was looking at. That's a first for me: NGC 604. A vaguely nonstellar patch, not easy to see, but very cool -- what's not to like about observing a nebula in an entirely different galaxy?

Jupiter - Seeing was not great, and the GRS was on the other side of the planet, but I spent some time on this gas giant anyway. The usual was apparent: the southern section of the planet was broken up into a banded mess, the NEB was dark and contrasty with some swirls, the planet's polar regions did not show much, and... a festoon? Yes, a prominent blue festoon curved across the equatorial Jovian atmosphere, accompanied by a blue patch rooting it to the NEB. Pretty interesting, I've never seen one of these before.

Overall, a pretty decent night. Detecting M101 that low to the horizon was absurd, and I did not expect to see two dust lanes in M31. NGC 604 was neat, and I now know how and what to look for when I want to observe festoons.

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#350 BrentKnight

BrentKnight

    Cosmos

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Posted 31 October 2022 - 03:29 PM

It was overcast all day Sunday, so I was very surprised to get home after league bowling to find the skies clear!  This was about 9pm, and Luna was just above the treeline - maybe I could catch a couple more targets that I'd missed during the early phases for the AL project.

 

I quickly pulled out the AT102ED (banging the tripod into a couple things I should not have banged it into).  I got it setup in record time just outside the garage door.  It took me way longer than I felt it necessary to get my lunar chart oriented correctly to what the telescope was showing me, but finally I did.  I was able to track down a single target before noticing the "top" of the Moon was disappearing - dang neighbors roof.  Luckily I could pick the whole rig up and drag it a little farther down the driveway (grab-n-go?).  I had to do this at least three more times before I ended up in the grass of the front yard.  It was a losing battle, but I managed another 5 targets before I gave up for the night.

 

It was very fun though...


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