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Observation log continued; IV

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#426 Migwan

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Posted 04 November 2022 - 01:25 PM

I'm afraid I don't get the reference... "Time study guy"?

 

 

Thanks! I had some difficulty trying to get the gamma/brightness/contrast settings to be acceptable in each image. With a dark area on one side and an overexposed bright side on the other, it was tricky. This was about the best I could come up with without cropping the images down a lot farther.

 

Tony

Sorry.  Someone who analyzes how efficient employees are.   I was amazed by all you got done in an hour and thirty five minutes.   


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#427 Jehujones

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Posted 04 November 2022 - 03:14 PM

I know. I really need to take the time to learn those NGC numbers! This was the Fuzzy Butterfly Cluster, different than the Butterfly Cluster. Not sure why it's called that, though.

Lawnmower Cluster: NGC 663.

Fuzzy Butterfly Cluster: NGC 654

Sailboat Cluster: NGC 225

I tend to personally do better with the names.

I'll have to chime in and agree with avoiding many of the names.

There are of course some exceptions that are pretty safe, I don't think too many would have trouble with calling out M45 by name.

Sometimes the designation and even the "official" name are better replaced by their common name instead of Collinder 399 or "Brocchi's cluster".

In fact sometimes you would have to choose which designation to use instead of a name when you have multiple designations, like Caldwell 41 / Collinder 50 / Melotte 25.

I certainly would have no objections to The Pleiades, The Coathanger or The Hyades.


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#428 Studly

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Posted 04 November 2022 - 04:31 PM

Sorry.  Someone who analyzes how efficient employees are.   I was amazed by all you got done in an hour and thirty five minutes.   

Ah. I thought that might be it, but I wasn't sure in what context you were applying it!

 

Tony



#429 NYJohn S

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Posted 04 November 2022 - 06:07 PM

I got out again last night hoping for a repeat of the excellent seeing we had the previous night but no such luck. I was ready with the AT102ED this time too.

Jupiter - I set up around 10:00pm just in time to catch the GRS almost centered on the planet. It took about 20 mins for the refractor to get acclimated and then I found the best views were at 130x. I could see the GRS as a pale salmon color or soft pink. I tried different magnifications as high as 194x but really couldn't see any more detail than the views at 130x. That was with a Meade 5.5mm and no Barlow. I also played around with some filters. A blue and a neutral density filter. The blue did give the belts a little more contrast so they stood out but I really can't say I saw any more detail.

The GRS seemed to have a white or cream area around it just inside the South Equatorial Belt. There was also a light area that curved around the GRS which I guess is the SouthTropical Zone. The belts seemed twisted together and mixed up in that area. I saw an image someone posted from that night and it helped clear things up - https://www.cloudyni...upiter-11-3-c8/

The North Equatorial belt was prominent but other than that I actually saw less detail than the previous night with the smaller scope. Just shows how much more you can see when the seeing is excellent like that.

Mars - I was actually able to go to a higher magnification on Mars - 194x. There really wasn't a lot going on though. A few vague dark area on the southern end of the planet. I didn't see any polar cap but there was a brightening on the North edge of the planet.

Almach - I really wanted to check the colors on this because I split it with my ST120 a few nights earlier and for the first time the secondary almost looked green to me. At 130x with the AT102 it looked blue or Aqua as usual. Went up to 194x to confirm the colors and that was a really nice view. Both stars had diffraction rings around them but weren't totally stable. It was almost as if the rings were spinning. The primary was a nice yellow and the secondary a vibrant blue. I can see some yellow in the blue leaning towards aqua but not the green I saw with the ST120. I guess the CA changes the color?

NGC 752 -This is a binocular stop for me under dark skies so while in the neighborhood I stopped by. At 30x it nearly filled the eyepiece with stars. It looked rich even with the Moon. The 5th mag yellow and orange stars on the SW edge really caught my eye.

M45 - I ended the night with this. Out of all of my scopes the AT102 seems like the best match for this large open cluster. With my ES 68º 24mm it fits comfortably and the smaller stars resolve nicely. Everything stays nice and crisp out to the edges.

So a short session but it was nice to get out again. I noticed the focuser on the AT102 needs an adjustment. It was slipping a bit when pointed near zenith. I'll have to work on that.

Clear Skies
John

Edited by NYJohn S, 04 November 2022 - 06:27 PM.

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#430 Jehujones

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Posted 04 November 2022 - 08:38 PM

Clouds are moving in so no observing tonight but at least not a total loss...

 

image_2022-11-04_183555062.png

 

straight from the iphone, untouched. not even close to what it really looked like


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#431 Nankins

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 12:06 PM

I'll have to chime in and agree with avoiding many of the names.
There are of course some exceptions that are pretty safe, I don't think too many would have trouble with calling out M45 by name.
Sometimes the designation and even the "official" name are better replaced by their common name instead of Collinder 399 or "Brocchi's cluster".
In fact sometimes you would have to choose which designation to use instead of a name when you have multiple designations, like Caldwell 41 / Collinder 50 / Melotte 25.
I certainly would have no objections to The Pleiades, The Coathanger or The Hyades.


I really struggle with catalogue numbers outside of the Messier catalogue. But I'm still learning! I have also
been doing plenty of observations on the Slooh telescopes, which use catalogue names as well as common names where applicable. Maybe I
should pay more attention and use this to help me learn to associate objects with their catalogue number(s). But I would probably still use a name
in the cases where an object looks like what it's named after. For instance, the Sailboat Cluster, which really did remind me of a ship's sails!
I have health issues that including brain fog and memory loss, and therefore I tend to find names easier to remember.
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#432 Jehujones

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 02:00 PM

I really struggle with catalogue numbers outside of the Messier catalogue. But I'm still learning! I have also
been doing plenty of observations on the Slooh telescopes, which use catalogue names as well as common names where applicable. Maybe I
should pay more attention and use this to help me learn to associate objects with their catalogue number(s). But I would probably still use a name
in the cases where an object looks like what it's named after. For instance, the Sailboat Cluster, which really did remind me of a ship's sails!
I have health issues that including brain fog and memory loss, and therefore I tend to find names easier to remember.

waytogo.gif Hey, just go with whatever works for you. It'll make us all better to look them up.wink.gif


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#433 BrentKnight

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 03:03 PM

This topic of common/popular names comes up quite often.  Best practice is to just include a catalog designation (NGC/IC, Messier, Caldwell...) along with your chosen name.  That way, we all know what you are talking about.


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#434 Jehujones

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 03:30 PM

This topic of common/popular names comes up quite often.  Best practice is to just include a catalog designation (NGC/IC, Messier, Caldwell...) along with your chosen name.  That way, we all know what you are talking about.

Well, at least Nankins does give us the constellations so that narrows it down. I think I’ve seen a lot of those kinds of names in Stellarium. I don’t like them but I will gladly accept them to have one more person joining the posts. As long as everyone doesn’t start doing it.


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#435 NYJohn S

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 06:50 PM

Just came in from a quick look at the Moon. It’s a good night for Schröter’s Valley / “Cobra Head”. I was surprised I could see it so well with the hazy sky.
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#436 ETXer

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 07:56 PM

Last night was another opportunity to observe and image Jupiter while a clear night opportunity exists and it's in a convenient location and time. Again, with my Celestar 8 Deluxe/ 2x Ultima Barlow/ 26mm Plossl, I was able to get some beautiful looks before I began another imaging attempt. The only drawback was that the seeing was once again average at best, not affecting visual observing quite as much as the imaging.

 

Both equatorial bands were quite prominent, and the north polar zone was evident with a small amount of detail. The GRS at the beginning was barely visible on the edge of the disk, blending in with the south equatorial belt, but becoming more visible as it departed from the limb.

 

After nearly an hour passed, it was time to start imaging, this time using my newly acquired ZWO ASI224MC (having used a ASI120MC up to now). Unexpectedly, after about six video captures, the image on the screen began flickering; I looked up and clouds were rolling in! Very frustrating.

 

In any case, I processed what I was able to get and here's the best of the bunch. Astrospheric promises Monday evening to be clear with above-average seeing, so hopefully I'll get another attempt and improve the results. It's nice that Jupiter is being patient and cooperative!

 

Cheers, Allan


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#437 BrentKnight

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 08:08 PM

Allan...I decided a while back after doing planetary for a couple month, that it really wasn't for me (way too much post-processing for my tastes).  I did learn though that it makes you a much better visual planetary observer.  I don't claim that I can see the details that the camera brings out, but after doing the imaging - I know what to look for.

 

Your captures are getting very good.  Thanks for sharing...


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#438 WillR

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 08:16 PM

I know. I really need to take the time to learn those NGC numbers! This was the Fuzzy Butterfly Cluster, different than the Butterfly Cluster. Not sure why it's called that, though.

Lawnmower Cluster: NGC 663.

Fuzzy Butterfly Cluster: NGC 654

Sailboat Cluster: NGC 225

I tend to personally do better with the names.

NGC 663 is one of my favorite clusters. I never heard the name "Lawnmower Cluster". I'll have to look for the lawnmower next time.

 

I tend to think of all of them by their catalogue numbers, except a few. It does have the advantage of helping remember where they are since the NGC catalogue numbers are ordered by right ascension.


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#439 WillR

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 08:31 PM

I'll have to chime in and agree with avoiding many of the names.

There are of course some exceptions that are pretty safe, I don't think too many would have trouble with calling out M45 by name.

Sometimes the designation and even the "official" name are better replaced by their common name instead of Collinder 399 or "Brocchi's cluster".

In fact sometimes you would have to choose which designation to use instead of a name when you have multiple designations, like Caldwell 41 / Collinder 50 / Melotte 25.

I certainly would have no objections to The Pleiades, The Coathanger or The Hyades.

I certainly don't want to put Nankins on the spot. My GF can't remember highway numbers at all- some people just don't remember numbers.

 

But aside from that, it's an interesting topic. I try to include a name and a catalog number. But I draw the line at the Caldwell catalog which I consider more on a personal observing list. In some cases like the Pleiades, more people know them by that name than M45. And names change and can be subject to cultural trends. Is it the Eskimo Nebula or Clown Nebula? I prefer Eskimo, but is that no longer ok? Owl Cluster or ET? Now here I find ET describes the shape better. That's why Nankins likes Sailboat cluster, and I will be looking at it with that name in mind.

 

But I have wandered too far off the topic.


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#440 ETXer

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Posted 05 November 2022 - 08:48 PM

Allan...I decided a while back after doing planetary for a couple month, that it really wasn't for me (way too much post-processing for my tastes).  I did learn though that it makes you a much better visual planetary observer.  I don't claim that I can see the details that the camera brings out, but after doing the imaging - I know what to look for.

 

Your captures are getting very good.  Thanks for sharing...

Thank you Brent, and I couldn’t agree more on how imaging can hone planetary (or even DSO) observation skills. And I’m doing exactly that during these observing/imaging sessions, the two activities really compliment each other.

 

As far as the planetary/lunar imaging, my ASI224MC is as far as I plan to take it, and with excellent seeing I’ll be able to greatly improve the results to my satisfaction. I’ve already gotten great solar results (with the 174MM). The only DSO imaging I do (if you call it that) is with my Revolution Imager 2 EAA analog camera using a mini DVR and that’s good enough for me… nothing fancy, but a “souvenir” of the observing session.

 

Cheers, Allan


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#441 daveb2022

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Posted 06 November 2022 - 12:23 AM

Last night was a good example of a steady sky but horrible transparency.

 

Temps were in the low 60's and dropped into the upper 50's with 47% humidity while I was out.

 

I used a couple of sky condition sites and Clear Sky said 4/5 seeing and 4/5 transparency. The radar map showed cloud cover moving in by 1am but showed it to be very clear until midnight.

 

It was cloudy when I set up and basically light cover continued to obstruct brightness while allowing different levels of light through most of the night. So much for the transparency predictions. The only sacrifice was light gathering and thankfully the cloud cover was somewhat uniform and thin. There were times it got so bad I could not visually see Vega and Saturn would blink in and out. But it was some of the most steady seeing of late. It allowed me to go past 200x with my NP-101 refractor quite easily using a 2.5 Nagler.

 

My first target was Saturn and even in low light it was a treat to view. I could see the main division ring sharply and quite a bit of detail on the planet itself. However it got very very dim at times.

 

For about a half hour I stuck with Saturn, then cloud cover moved out and I picked up a few easy deep space objects. I couldn't see the Moon or Jupiter as they were blocked by my roof, but the moon really lit up the sky affecting some of the DSO's. I still was able to observe NGC-7009, M-2, M-27(barely), M-57, and about a dozen doubles I had access to. I split a few stars I haven't been able to over the past month or so. Stars were pinpoint and closer equal doubles like Epsilon Lyrae produced an almost perfect figure 8 airy disk past 200x. ADS 11871 was one I couldn't split.

 

It wasn't long before thin clouds rolled back in. By then Jupiter and the Moon were coming into my viewable slot. Again, super steady views with diminished light. It was good enough to keep me interested as I bounced back and forth between an 82% Moon and Jupiter. As with Saturn, the detail on Jupiter was much sharper than normal... even in thicker cloud cover. It was as steady as I've ever seen it, but it also winked out now and then. I tried a contrast filter but the views of Jupiter were best un-filtered. I saw what appeared to be a whitish spot between the bands.

 

 

The Moon wasn't the best as I've seen in past years but did fare well in the heavier clouds due to its brilliance. I could see the cloud cover move across the face. 

 


Nights like this is when I'm sorry I didn't set up one of my tracking mounts, but to be honest, I wouldn't have taken the time to do so considering the cloud cover at dusk was so bad. Plus, I find myself really liking simple these days.

 

By midnight some major overcast took over and the clouds finally won. Shut down after midnight. Still, it was a very productive night IMO

 

 

 

Picture of the sky around 8:30 Pacific daylight savings time.

Attached Thumbnails

  • cloud cover1.jpg

Edited by daveb2022, 06 November 2022 - 12:35 AM.

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#442 BFaucett

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Posted 06 November 2022 - 04:00 AM

Just came in from a quick look at the Moon. It’s a good night for Schröter’s Valley / “Cobra Head”. I was surprised I could see it so well with the hazy sky.

 
Well, there's that old saying about 'great minds think alike'... wink.gif  I was also observing the Aristarchus Plateau early this morning (Nov 6 from about 1:00-1:30 am) with my AT70ED. The Aristarchus Plateau is one of my favorite areas to observe. Schröter’s Valley displayed nice contrast and Aristarchus was a bright white with some terraced detail visible in the crater wall. I was using a Meade 5000 PWA 4mm eyepiece for 105x with a 25% neutral density filter. The Moon was about 90% illuminated. Nice, clear night at approx 60° F. It was an enjoyable grab-n-go session.

 

A guide to the Moon's Aristarchus Crater
BBC Sky At Night Magazine
https://www.skyatnig...tarchus-crater/

 

Aristarchus Plateau - LROC.jpg

The Aristarchus Plateau as seen by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA

click on the pic to view a larger image

 

 

AT70ED_sml_gallery_230527_18198_2322540.jpg

My AT70ED on an Orion Paragon HD-F2 tripod.

 

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif


Edited by BFaucett, 06 November 2022 - 04:22 AM.

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#443 chrysalis

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Posted 06 November 2022 - 04:01 AM

NGC 663 is one of my favorite clusters. I never heard the name "Lawnmower Cluster". I'll have to look for the lawnmower next time.

 

I tend to think of all of them by their catalogue numbers, except a few. It does have the advantage of helping remember where they are since the NGC catalogue numbers are ordered by right ascension.

Diverging BACK (so is that "reverging? ;) ) to topic:

 

NGC663 is a lovely OC, and is flanked by NGC654 and NGC659. In a wide field view these make a gorgeous triple cluster :waytogo: !!


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#444 NYJohn S

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Posted 07 November 2022 - 10:18 AM

 
Well, there's that old saying about 'great minds think alike'... wink.gif  I was also observing the Aristarchus Plateau early this morning (Nov 6 from about 1:00-1:30 am) with my AT70ED. The Aristarchus Plateau is one of my favorite areas to observe. Schröter’s Valley displayed nice contrast and Aristarchus was a bright white with some terraced detail visible in the crater wall. I was using a Meade 5000 PWA 4mm eyepiece for 105x with a 25% neutral density filter. The Moon was about 90% illuminated. Nice, clear night at approx 60° F. It was an enjoyable grab-n-go session.

 

A guide to the Moon's Aristarchus Crater
BBC Sky At Night Magazine
https://www.skyatnig...tarchus-crater/

 

attachicon.gifAristarchus Plateau - LROC.jpg

The Aristarchus Plateau as seen by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA

click on the pic to view a larger image

 

 

attachicon.gifAT70ED_sml_gallery_230527_18198_2322540.jpg

My AT70ED on an Orion Paragon HD-F2 tripod.

 

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif

Thanks for the image and link Bob! Glad you caught it too. Seeing it so well was a surprise for me. My sky was hazy, not quite as bad but similar to the image Dave posted above.

 

I didn't post a report but I noticed the nearby Agricola Mountains and Agricola Straits for the first time. They way the light was hitting the mountains really made them stand out along with the flat Plateau just before them. It looked to me like there was another lava flooded crater on the opposite side of Montes Agricola near Herodotus E but looking at a chart I think there are a few Sinuous Rilles there that curve and give the impression of a submerged crater. 

 

With everything going on there I'd love to have another look with a larger scope. I didn't see or notice Rima Agricola running along in front of the Agricola Mountains. I'm not sure how hard it is to see but it would be interesting. I should study these things before going out and not after smile.gif.

 

Here's a link to the Agricola Mountains and Agricola Straits with some of the features I mentioned labeled - http://apollo.sese.a...W/20090421.html

 

Btw, I was at viewing at 156x with the AT72EDII. I guess hazy skies = stable atmosphere.

 

ClearSkies!

John


Edited by NYJohn S, 07 November 2022 - 10:49 AM.

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#445 Studly

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Posted 07 November 2022 - 02:31 PM

Even though I wasn't feeling too great last night, I still got out for a short session on the Moon:

 

 

2022-11-06
Time: 21:30 local time (EST); 02:30 UT (11-07)
Cloud Cover: Approximately 20% and variable
Wind: Light
SQM Measurement: 17.46
Temperature: 9C/48F
Relative Humidity: 66%
Transparency: Average (3/5)
Seeing: Fair (2/5)
Length of Observing Session: 1h 35m
Instrument: Celestron C6-N Newtonian (fl750, f/5)
Mount: Orion VersaGo II Alt-Az
Eyepieces: Baader Hyperion with Orion Neutral Density Filter

 

Summary: The forecast called for clear skies, but below-average Seeing. The reality was a bit different—there were definitely some clouds in the area, but they were not in the vicinity of the Moon. Despite not feeling too well, I grabbed the C6-N and made a quick survey of the terminator areas.

 

Moon (Waxing Gibbous): The Moon was approximately 12 days old, standing at about 95% illuminated. I employed the Baader Hyperion 8mm (93x) using the Orion NDF to reduce the glare.

 

-Pythagoras, Oenopides, and Markov: Starting near the northern polar region and working my way southward along the terminator, the first feature of note was the crater Pythagoras. The terminator lay just west of its western rim, and its large central peak was easily visible. The crater’s entire rim was well-lit, and a pronounced shadow could be seen stretching from the eastern rim to the central peak. Very nice. A small line of raised terrain led southward from the crater’s southern rim, ending at the somewhat smaller crater Oenopides. The crater was slightly farther removed from the terminator, showing a fairly well-lit and smooth floor. Its perimeter was well-defined, and a thin shadow was cast onto the crater’s floor from its eastern rim. South of there, the smaller crater Markov was noticeable. Two adjacent, ghostly craters were glimpsed to the southeast and southwest during moments of steadier Seeing. The Atlas labeled the southeastern one as Markov-U.

 

-Cavalerius, Hevelius, Lohrman, and Grimaldi: Continuing southward, the terminator cut across Sinus Roris and into Oceanus Procellarum. Just north of the lunar equator, two craters stood out well—Cavalerius and Hevelius. Cavalerius (the northern) displayed a dark interior, but its internal western rim caught the incoming sunlight well. Adjacent to Cavalerius’ southern rim, the larger crater Hevelius sat. The terminator lay only a short distance removed from its western rim. Despite its proximity to the darkness, though, the floor was well-lit, with only small shadows visible along the southern and northern parts of its eastern floor. Adjacent to Hevelius to the south lay the much smaller Lohrman. A short distance south of there, the dark, convex floor or Grimaldi crouched on the surface. The terminator line sat directly on its western rim, causing its perimeter to appear particularly rough and uneven, Shadows seemed to “pool” along the base of its interior rim, while the central part of the floor appeared dome-shaped. Very cool.

 

-Darwin and Byrgius: Continuing southward, the terrain became brighter, leading to the large, foreshortened crater Darwin. Its western edge sat just inside the light. Its floor remained hidden in darkness, but its internal western rim shone in the light like polished aluminum. A short distance to the southeast lay Byrgius. Though smaller than its neighbor, it carved out a very clear outline amidst the brighter terrain. Between Darwin and Byrgius ran an elevated ridge casting a black shadow into the darkness of the terminator. Another notable ridge lay east of there, also casting its own significant shadow.

 

-Lagrange, Piazzi, and Inghirami: Continuing along the terminator southward, two ragged adjacent craters were next encountered—Lagrange and Piazzi. Both appeared severely foreshortened and difficult to trace out. Their rims appeared rough and irregular, while their interiors remained dark. Farther south, another much sharper crater sat against the terminator—Inghirami. It displayed a well-lit rim surrounding a blackened interior. Only the first rays of the rising Sun were catching upper portions of the interior western rim. Outstanding view.

 

-Ejecta Rays: Following the terminator farther south toward the southern polar region, positive identification of features became impractical. However, examining the disc of the Moon in its entirely drew attention to the ejecta ray systems of the more prominent craters. Tycho’s rays stretched nearly halfway across the visible surface, putting on a grand display. Copernicus and Kepler both showed their expansive ray systems arcing across the surface. Closer inspection revealed numerous smaller impacts scattered across the surface showing prominent ray marks, as well. Excellent.

 

Conclusion: The variable wind was moving the scope just enough to blur the view on occasion. Also, my health difficulties were making themselves known more adamantly. These two factors convinced me to end the session.

 

 

Until next time!


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#446 wxcloud

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Posted 07 November 2022 - 04:11 PM

Nov 7th 22 Shimmering solar short

Managed to sneak out the ls50tha on the alt az mount today during a lull in the clouds and potential wind a little later. CSC had poor seeing forecast but I wanted to look anyway. The view even though it looked underwater hat higher magnification still looked good once I got tuning decent. Found the massive AR3141 region and AR3140 near by. The spots where large and the area looked pretty dynamic. Next quadrant over a group of filaments gave the impression of the sun being pealed away (first impression the term "chatter marks" came to mind).

More towards the bottom of my view a couple larger filaments daisy chained from the surface.

Once I got more zoomed in to 7.2mm the bad seeing was really noticable.

Spent a little time just cruising around the surface looking. While the limb did show some proms, the surface had my attention more.

Even had my mom take a little look what she could see, noting a prom off the bottom of the view that looked like the sun has a little tail or tornado :)

Edited by wxcloud, 07 November 2022 - 04:32 PM.

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#447 WillR

WillR

    Mercury-Atlas

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  • Loc: Stroudsburg, PA

Posted 07 November 2022 - 08:15 PM

I did three nights on the waxing moon, using the moon tours by Ken Hewitt-White in The Backyard Astronomer. I was observing with my 6" F/10, mostly with a 12mm or 9mm for 125x and 167x. There seemed to be periods of excellent seeing, but my experience judging that is limited. But mostly very sharp!

 

I worked through tours 5-9.  Highlights were Plato (however could not see the craterlets; the Alpes and Appennines; three "A" craters: Aristillus, Autolycus, and Archimedes; Clavius and all its little craters- L,J, K, N, C and D; Tycho; Maginus and its offspring G, F, N, C; four more "A"s! Ammonius, Alphonsus, and Arzachel, and Alpetragius; the straight wall!  Rupes Recta and Rima Burt; Thebit; Copernicus including all three peaks inside! Stadius! and Eratosthenes.

 

I did some drawing. I have also just learned about the "Lunar 100" and downloaded the file. This seems like a great compliment to the Messier list for those moonlit nights. Excited to be getting more involved in lunar observing.


Edited by WillR, 07 November 2022 - 10:54 PM.

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#448 BFaucett

BFaucett

    Gemini

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  • Loc: Houston, Texas 29.8° N

Posted 07 November 2022 - 11:08 PM

Since there seems to be some interest lately in lunar observing waytogo.gif, I thought some here might find this free monthly newsletter to be of interest (for those that may not already be aware of it).
 

 

alpo_logo_copy.jpg

  

Link for The Lunar Observer monthly newsletter (a pdf file for download):
https://alpo-astronomy.org/lunarblog/
  
As an example issue, here's the direct link for the November 2022 issue (124 pages!):
https://alpo-astrono...2/tlo202211.pdf

 

The Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO)

https://alpo-astronomy.org/

 
Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif


Edited by BFaucett, 08 November 2022 - 01:25 AM.

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#449 WillR

WillR

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  • Loc: Stroudsburg, PA

Posted 08 November 2022 - 03:41 AM

Going out now for some lunar eclipse viewing. Clear here!


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#450 radiofm74

radiofm74

    Apollo

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  • Loc: Milano (Italy)

Posted 08 November 2022 - 06:33 AM

Wow, the wealth of information on this thread! I am unable to keep up as I'd like but here's an "amassed report" from the last week: I'll be extra-brief, skip some pleasant but unremarkable sessions, and only point out highlights or objects that were new to me and might be new to other forum members.

 

27.10.22 Cas small and obscure clusters: Bortle 4, so-so transparency, C6, going for clusters in Cassiopeia: starting at M52 (very nice), trying for the Bubble Nebula (no dice, I think 6” is too little), I then move to WZ Cassiopeia (bright orange carbon star) and looking on the Skysafari map I notice a string of little clusters. I cannot see Berkely 58, but find NGC7790 and NGC7788 (and barely-visible Frolov 1) and together they make for a fine view. Other views of the night are less remarkable, and then it clouds over.

29-30.10.22 a photographic weekend near Verona: Bortle 5, high humidity, 3" refractor. First night, the most fun is setting up on the front porch of the hotel showing the lovely moon, Saturn and Jupiter to interested guests and personnel. Later on, Jupiter shows a beautiful conjunction of Ganymede and Io. Neptune is a faint, small teal dot. 65 Psc is a wonderful, perfect cat’s eyes pair. Next night I set up for astrophotography and get three hours on the Eastern Veil in dwindling transparency. I hope to add more integration, but for now, noisy as it is, the picture is below ;D

1.11 Grab’n’go session in Lausanne. What a delight a 3" on an alt/az mount is. I was tired out but thanks to the set-up I went out anyway in the courtyard. Jupiter: in fleeting moments of good seeing I see a few more bands (easier with blue filter). Alrischa is a highlight: Split with Vicky (my 3") in barlowed 6mm, it’s 1.8” separation and a night of average seeing. Not the cleanest split but both stars clearly visible. White and yellow to me…. Deep, golden yellow. In good moments, tiniest gap! Mesarthim is a beautiful matched pair. 1 Ari is another highlight: Beautiful small pair, testing Vicky (split with 6mm but better in 10 barlowed). After some looking it shows an intensely yellow primary with a pale blue secondary. Lovely, and a favorite!

5.11.22: moon and Cepheus stars in Milano with 6" Newt. Fine night with the Moon nearing full. Seeing is very bad so no more than 18 mm (42x) but lunar features are beautiful. Golden Handle, Gassendi, a jumble of craters behind it. More subtly: Schröter’s Valley, Dorsa around Marius, perhaps a hint of the Marius Hills. S Cep is a total highlight: not bright (at minimum?) but incredibly red. Never seen such a ruby red star. Beautiful! The Garnet star (Mu Cep) which I visit later is very different, fiery bright and a rather light orange. STF2816: so very bright and beautiful and its minor neighbours, STF2815 and STF2819

6.11.22 – Cas doubles and clusters in Milano. Moon near full, great transparency due to wind, average/bad seeing, my faithful 6" Newt. I start on the Moon (do I see the Marius hills?). I go for the last doubles in my Cas list, but due to great transparency stay for the clusters! M103 is a dusting of stars among several such little groupings and clusters – charming, grainy even in such a light-polluted sky. STF131 is the bright star at the tip of the Wedge and a fainter companion quite wide (at 75x) to the S/SE. There should be an even fainter “C” component in that direction. Not that impressive in itself but a nice added bonus to lovely Messier 103. Hunting for more doubles I come across NGC663. Just like M103 even with a full moon and metro sky, it’s a delight. The whole area is fantastic given good transparency: bright stars and many little grainy clusters… I knew them well but never thought they'd be so nice in such a sky. Two doubles in NGC663: STF151, lovely little dim double one side of a triangle of stars in the heart of the cluster, and STF153, a slightly brighter and better matched on the NE side of the cluster. My doubles hunt ends in glory with Iota Cas, which I don't recall seeing before: one of the most beautiful multiple systems I’ve observed. At first just a nice "mom and baby" double: bright white primary and a red, almost plum secondary to the E, fairly easy. Cranking up to about 170x (10mm + 2.25 Barlow) I see the "B" component: yellow in comparison to shiny white A, tight to its SW.

7.11.22: Mars in Milano! Good forecast turns out to be untrue: thick passing cloud. Almach peeps out from a gap in the clouds, and it's so beautiful. Then second look at STF292 in Perseus: a very wide triple at low power, a bright star and two well-matched and close fainter companions. Nice. It's clouding over but I go to check out Mars as it peeps out. Initial skepticism ("it’ll be the usual orange disk") gives way to wonder and excitement. At last, in spite of so-so seeing, I manage to make out features at ≈170x: a very prominent ice cap and dark features. If I got this right (with the help of the S&T Mars profiler) what I saw was the N Ice Cap, Mare Erythreum and Mare Acidalium. I am thinking of using filters because passing cloud, when light, actually helped in reducing the glare and making the features stand out better. In any case, I am a Mars convert!

 

 

gcF764uh.jpg


Edited by radiofm74, 08 November 2022 - 06:34 AM.

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