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Observation log continued; IV

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#451 Migwan

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 06:35 AM

Deb & I just came in.  We agreed that the lunar eclipse looked like a peach.  Maybe we should have grabbed a breakfast snack before going out.

 

Pulled the ST80 and 8x42s out.  Along with the moon, we took a peak at the Orion Nebula, Pleiades & Mars.   Mars showed a bit of dark area, but you couldn't put a shape on it in all the CA.

 

I pulled a NELM of 5.35 and Deb a 4.35 in Perseus around Mirfak.  CSC had T=3/5 S=3/5.  They might have been a little light.

 

Enjoy


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#452 BrentKnight

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 06:39 AM

Wow, the wealth of information on this thread! I am unable to keep up as I'd like but here's an "amassed report" from the last week: I'll be extra-brief, skip some pleasant but unremarkable sessions, and only point out highlights or objects that were new to me and might be new to other forum members.

 

27.10.22 Cas small and obscure clusters: Bortle 4, so-so transparency, C6, going for clusters in Cassiopeia: starting at M52 (very nice), trying for the Bubble Nebula (no dice, I think 6” is too little), I then move to WZ Cassiopeia (bright orange carbon star) and looking on the Skysafari map I notice a string of little clusters. I cannot see Berkely 58, but find NGC7790 and NGC7788 (and barely-visible Frolov 1) and together they make for a fine view. Other views of the night are less remarkable, and then it clouds over.

 

...

Open Cluster Alley from a couple months ago.  Love this area of the sky.

 

Very nice Veil!


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#453 BrentKnight

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 06:42 AM

Deb & I just came in.  We agreed that the lunar eclipse looked like a peach.  Maybe we should have grabbed a breakfast snack before going out.

 

Pulled the ST80 and 8x42s out.  Along with the moon, we took a peak at the Orion Nebula, Pleiades & Mars.   Mars showed a bit of dark area, but you couldn't put a shape on it in all the CA.

 

I pulled a NELM of 5.35 and Deb a 4.35 in Perseus around Mirfak.  CSC had T=3/5 S=3/5.  They might have been a little light.

 

Enjoy

I saw most of it.  I'll post more later - bedtime.  It was very dark though...started showing more color as it got closer to the horizon.

 

Anyone catch Uranus just above it?  Same field with the AT102ED and the Nagler 31.


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#454 radiofm74

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 06:43 AM

Cluster Alley from a couple months ago.  Love this area of the sky.

 

Very nice Veil!

"Cluster Alley" is so cool ;D

Goes to show… I should follow this thread more closely.

Cassiopeia is pure joy! I've also tried the Bubble Nebula but I'm probably undergunned for that… 


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#455 monolithic

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 07:03 AM

I saw most of it.  I'll post more later - bedtime.  It was very dark though...started showing more color as it got closer to the horizon.

 

Anyone catch Uranus just above it?  Same field with the AT102ED and the Nagler 31.

I got Uranus. Disced with the 6mm, just looked like a pale undetailed blue ball somewhat larger than the Galilean moons.

On to the main event, yet another lunar eclipse report! Came out a little past halfway being eclipsed by the umbra. Stayed with it until the penumbra gave way to a sliver of glowing white moon. During totality the moon was the color you see when you shine a flashlight through your hand, pretty cool. I preferred the views through the finderscope as opposed to the 10", probably because it showed a much richer color. Got some nice photos/videos throughout the eclipse.

One highlight of this session was a bright blue-green fireball, lasting 1 to 1.5 seconds, streaking below the moon at around 5:50 AM. Easily the coolest meteor I've seen, and one that I am going to have to sketch.

Glad I got to see most of the cool parts, much better than the last eclipse which was clouded over. Very cool event.


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#456 Studly

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 03:21 PM

Since there seems to be some interest lately in lunar observing waytogo.gif, I thought some here might find this free monthly newsletter to be of interest (for those that may not already be aware of it).
 

 

attachicon.gifalpo_logo_copy.jpg

  

Link for The Lunar Observer monthly newsletter (a pdf file for download):
https://alpo-astronomy.org/lunarblog/
  
As an example issue, here's the direct link for the November 2022 issue (124 pages!):
https://alpo-astrono...2/tlo202211.pdf

 

The Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO)

https://alpo-astronomy.org/

 
Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif

Yep, I am a member. I have started going through their training program.

 

Tony


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#457 Studly

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 03:24 PM

Here are my brief notes from this morning's total lunar eclipse:

 

 

2022-11-08
Time: 03:05 local time (EST); 08:05 UT (11-08)
Cloud Cover: Approximately 80% and decreasing
Wind: Brisk
SQM Measurement: Not measured
Temperature: Approximately 35F
Relative Humidity: 76%
Transparency: Poor (1/5) to Fair (2/5)
Seeing: Fair (2/5) to Average (3/5)
Length of Observing Session: Approximately 1h total
Instrument: Celestron SkyMaster 25x70 Binoculars
Mount: Orion Paragon HD-F2 Fluid-Head Tripod
Eyepieces: NA

 

Summary: The sky started out very cloudy, but the clouds were thin enough for the full Moon to shine through them to provide a relatively decent view.

 

Moon (Full): The full Moon was shining brightly enough to still be visible, despite the clouds. I performed several checks on the status of the total lunar eclipse throughout the early morning, noting details and times as they were observed. Each mini-session lasted approximately 5-15 minutes (all I could comfortably tolerate with the strong wind).

 

-03:05 EST (08:05 UT): There was no apparent change in the brightness of the Moon at this point. Admittedly, however, the intervening clouds were almost certainly robbing the view of very subtle differences in the Moon’s brightness.

 

-03:15 EST (08:15 UT): The first observable dimming near the west-southwest quadrant became visible.

 

-03:45 EST (08:45 UT): The penumbral darkening was more pronounced at this point, and also more widespread.

 

-04:14 EST (09:14 UT): The umbral eclipse was well underway, with the Earth’s shadow carving out a very noticeable arc of darkness along the west-southwest quadrant. Very cool.

 

-04:45 EST (09:45 UT): The umbral shadow of the Earth covered just a fraction more than half the visible Moon. Hints of a rusty yellow coloring could be detected in the deepest part of the shadow. This was difficult to see with the clouds intervening, but the observation was confirmed.

 

-05:18 EST (10:18 UT): The coloration was much more obvious, varying from reddish light orange to yellowish light orange. At this point, I estimated the final Danjon rating of 3.5 for the full eclipse soon to follow.

 

-05:53 EST (10:53 UT): A light amber coloration was dominant over the entire Moon, with a definitely reddish tint visible in the southern quadrant. Confirmed Danjon 3.5.

 

-06:21 EST (11:21 UT): The coloring noted previously was consistent, with a slightly darker red tint visible in the southwestern quadrant. Again, Danjon 3.5 was noted.

 

Conclusion: Though I was hoping for a deeper coloring to the Moon, the eclipse provided some decent views. The light orange coloring was very appealing. Though the wind was too high to be able to reasonably capture any camera footage, the view through the 25x70 binoculars was very good.

 

 

Until next time!


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#458 UnityLover

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Posted 08 November 2022 - 10:06 PM

For planetary, got syrtis major on mars, the io transit on jupiter. For deeper sky, tried for m76, the little dumbell, but instead, I saw stars that looked like the double cluster, but there was an extra cluster. Noticed M42 was outside, so I tried for it. On a full moon. Bortle 7. 3 streetlights pointed at me and one that was 3 degrees down left of the orion nebula. It looked like andromeda when I saw it during a half moon, but shaped differently, with 4 stars in the middle.


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#459 wxcloud

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Posted 09 November 2022 - 01:33 AM

Missed the eclipse, guess the clouds remembered the last time there was one and I spent most of the time fighting with the camera and just decided to not witness that again lol. :p

Got another short solar session in today, about 30 minutes just taking in the surface. Counted 5 large sunspots today, the large active complex had some interesting features going in including a filament stood out for me. Noted a few more towards the limb that took on a 3d appearance due to the curvature. Surface was very active again today. Was hoping I'd catch a flare but didn't. Still was worth the view.

Later in the evening I sat the 127mm mak up on the AVX, yeah I ended up trying to do a little imaging to help offset the bad seeing but I did get some views in also. Jupiter showed a slightly different face to me tonight, the GRS was transiting but I could make much out, was more of a dim oval smudge. That's when I opted to try the camera. A few more details but not sure if it was much better. I mean it kinda was. Later in the evening I took another look and views looked to improve a little.

I took a break while Mars got higher, plan was to take my first crack at trying to image it for the season just to see what I could get. It clouded up with the thin high clouds actually producing a corona around the moon. Haven't seen that in a long time.

I did get a little glance at Mars which was now much higher, around 30°+ before the clouds thickened but didn't get much details pretty much an orange ball maybe a dark feature. I'm sure the seeing and degrading transparency didn't help there.

Orion was now up, though still low I figured it take a quick preview and sent the scope to the Orion nebula, first glance of the season!

The nebula was visible despite the slow scope and bad conditions. The trapezium was visible even in the 24mm panoptic. I tried to pull the E and F stars but no luck. Was good to get a quick preview in of the region, been waiting for a while now catching Orion rising here and there but without the scopes.

Not much of a report I guess. The solar session was pretty fun.
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#460 MrRoberts

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Posted 09 November 2022 - 08:28 AM

Even with the brightly moon lit sky the last couple of nights the skies have been giving us some good viewing here near Tucson.

Rolled the 15" out yesterday. I can usually leave it out for days weather permitting.

I use the 31 Nagler or 17 Ethos for trolling around. But when it's time to for a closer look the sky's last night allowed the 10 Delos to show its stuff.

Last night was the better so far. Saturn showed 3 moons with ease (and a couple of times I thought I saw a fourth).

Jupiter was the showstopper for me last night. Early in the evening I watched the grs until it rotated off. Then one of the moons came around from behind and did a nice transit.

I always enjoy watching the moon and the last 2 nights where great for it. but will be happy to get back to dso, binary things.


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#461 therealdmt

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Posted 09 November 2022 - 10:16 AM

I had a cool observation of the Lunar eclipse with my 72ED. I had seen on a sky-watching app while walking home from work earlier that Uranus would be right nearby, and looking through the telescope at the by-this-time only partially eclipsed Moon, I saw a lone star slightly to the west of the lunar disc. Ah, Uranus, I thought. Then, while taking it in, a brighter star suddenly popped out through some terrain on the lunar limb. Hmm. It was blue. Well, they can’t both be Uranus…

 

The newer arrival was brighter and bluer, but not clearly disk-shaped in the little 72, but I figured it had to be it. And, checking Stellarium, yep that was it, the newer "star" was Uranus. I broke out a 3x barlow to up the magnification, but there wasn’t any giant change in Uranus’ appearance. 

 

But the whole scene was quite cool with a dark reddened circlet on an otherwise bright white Moon seemingly staring down at the tiny planet like a giant eye. And stepping back from the scope, there over to the side was Jupiter shinining brightly naked eye. That made me think of the 3D perspective involved, with our own Earth’s shadow falling across our moon a quarter of a million miles away, and then distant Jupiter to the side, and a far more distant, seemingly tiny (invisible to the naked eye for me) Uranus just off the Moon‘s limb. Uranus and Neptune are really out there, I thought. And then, looking back in the eyepiece, I noticed again that lone star that I’d first mistaken for Uranus, HD 18357, lingering some 400-odd light years beyond.

 

Wrapped things up with a neat look at Jupiter and its moons. Ganymede, though brighter, reminded me of Uranus 


Edited by therealdmt, 09 November 2022 - 11:55 AM.

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#462 monolithic

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Posted 10 November 2022 - 10:03 AM

Last night, along with a good Jupiter session, I saw Neptune and spotted Triton as well. They were low to the ground so not much could be seen, but Neptune could be resolved as a disc and at times a vague point-smudge could be glimpsed up and to the right of Neptune. Checked Stellarium to see what it was, and turns out it was Triton; saw it multiple times, so it wasn't my imagination.

Pretty cool. Now I've seen all the major solar system planets. Next time I go out I'll try Ceres, and maybe Deimos + Phobos.


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#463 ETXer

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Posted 10 November 2022 - 09:09 PM

It's been a busy week!

 

Starting out Tuesday morning, my wife and I were able to catch the eclipse low in the west before setting behind the trees. The northwest quadrant was perceptively darker than the remainder as it was nearing the end of totality. I managed to grab a handheld shot with my Pentax KP DSLR and a 55-300 zoom (at 300mm).

 

52491906625_b7bfdec504_z.jpg

 

It was time to get back in before the morning activities, but also knowing I was going to spend time with Jupiter for the next two nights. That evening I was out again with my Celestar 8 Deluxe, and the classic Ultima SV Series 2x Barlow for 156x.

 

I was fortunate in that right now, Jupiter is in a convenient place and time and still close from its late-September opposition with clear skies. And it was a transit extravaganza! Tuesday night, even though the seeing was below average, not only the GRS was present and slightly more prominent than last week, but Io's shadow was visible as a tiny black dot on the western limb or the South Equatorial Belt, directly opposite the GRS; this was the first time I'd seen anything like it.

 

So last night, in better seeing, the GRS wasn't present, but I was treated to not only a Europa transit, but a double shadowing, Europa's and possibly Ganymede's since it was also close. Again, Europa's shadow stood out prominently, a sharp black dot in the south polar region.

 

I also was extremely lucky being able to image these events, the results and details of which can be found here

 

In all, an extremely satisfying two days and of lunar eclipse and planetary viewing and imaging.

 

Cheers, Allan


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#464 Nankins

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Posted 10 November 2022 - 10:09 PM

Just got back from helping with a Tiger Cub Scout outreach done by my local club at Purdue University's West Lafayette Observatory.
After the event was over the other two club members present began teaching me how to use the Go-To 16" Schmidt-Cassegrain, and I also got my
first views through it. I had never looked through anything bigger than 12" inches before, so this was fun. Despite the cloud cover coming in,
we first stopped at Jupiter, where I was able to see it in good detail, almost to the level of detail that I saw in my 10" just after opposition.
I was also able to see noticeable shading and texture in the South Equatorial Band. Then Saturn was next, and wow, there were 5 moons (Titan on the far right, Tethys, Rhea, Enceladus, and Dione together on the left),
and the C-ring was an obvious shadow in front of the planet's disk. The Cassini Division also showed up ok. But obviously seeing was not the best, soooo....
I wanted to try and see what some DSOs would look like in the scope, so we next went to M57. Had trouble finding it, so then we tried M13. Again, trouble finding it. So then we thought to try something in Cassiopeia.
The club member running the scope finally decided to look for NGC 457, and use that to help determine what needed to be done. She was able to see it in the edge of the field of view, so we realized that things were not quite
lined up enough. Once she got the object centered in the eyepiece, back we went to M13, and boom, there it was. Very nice, really reminded me of some of the better views I get in my 10".
Since we were viewing through clouds and light pollution, I really can't wait to go back to it when the clouds are not in sight!
M57 was the next stop (again!) and this time, it was sitting right there looking nice and big and smoke ring shape. I think I may have gotten a hint of some
structure. Clouds obviously were NOT helping here either. This was all with a 25 mm EP.
The Moon was the final stop, and a quick one. Clouds made it hard to focus properly, and once I did focus, the Moon looked nice and full, filling most of the field of view. I honestly could have spent more time looking
and examinging smaller details without changing the EP! And the cloud in front helped. Also played around a little with a variable polarizing filter that one of the club members had brought, very fun to use!

Looking forward to helping use this scope during outreach.
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#465 Danny Linguini

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 09:09 AM

My scope is just a few days old and I’m just cracking into a lot of things with it, so pretty much everything is still new to me, which means I’ll likely be posting a lot of mundane stuff (to you guys) here for awhile. lol.gif

 

First off, let’s get the aggravation part out of the way - my idiot neighbors like to randomly slap their flood lights on for no apparent reason. And of course they point directly at my patio where it’s most convenient for me to set up (right outside the door, table is handy for holding stuff). And for some reason they always pick about 5 minutes after I get set up to turn it on. So there were many profanities spewed over that last night. 
 

Luckily that was it for the foul language. 
 

Also unfortunately the viewing conditions weren’t so great - it started clouding over fairly early, combined with the brightness of the moon was enough that Starsense had a tough time figuring out where it was, and when it did, there just wasn’t much to be seen beyond the absolute brightest stuff. The air was also very humid, so the dew fell heavy and pretty much kept everything very wet all night. 
 

But it wasn’t all bad. A new 2x Barlow and an X-Cel LX 12mm EP arrived yesterday, and it stayed just clear enough to try them out. Barlow with the 12mm proved to be just a little too much (for the conditions, anyway) to get anything really in focus, so I’ll try that again on a clearer night. But the new 12mm gave me my best views of Jupiter yet, and my first view of 

mars. It was a little too mucky to get any good detail, but it was a start. 
 

As conditions worsened, I screwed on a moon filter and went exploring the moon for a bit. The little bit of details around the edges I’d never seen before were very cool to see, so I’m expecting as it wanes those views will only get better. Hopefully I’ll get a few more clear nights before the nighttime temps get too low. 
 

tl/dr: I saw Mars and the moon last night. grin.gif


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#466 chrysalis

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 09:44 AM

My scope is just a few days old and I’m just cracking into a lot of things with it, so pretty much everything is still new to me, which means I’ll likely be posting a lot of mundane stuff (to you guys) here for awhile. lol.gif

 

First off, let’s get the aggravation part out of the way - my idiot neighbors like to randomly slap their flood lights on for no apparent reason. And of course they point directly at my patio where it’s most convenient for me to set up (right outside the door, table is handy for holding stuff). And for some reason they always pick about 5 minutes after I get set up to turn it on. So there were many profanities spewed over that last night. 
 

Luckily that was it for the foul language. 
 

Also unfortunately the viewing conditions weren’t so great - it started clouding over fairly early, combined with the brightness of the moon was enough that Starsense had a tough time figuring out where it was, and when it did, there just wasn’t much to be seen beyond the absolute brightest stuff. The air was also very humid, so the dew fell heavy and pretty much kept everything very wet all night. 
 

But it wasn’t all bad. A new 2x Barlow and an X-Cel LX 12mm EP arrived yesterday, and it stayed just clear enough to try them out. Barlow with the 12mm proved to be just a little too much (for the conditions, anyway) to get anything really in focus, so I’ll try that again on a clearer night. But the new 12mm gave me my best views of Jupiter yet, and my first view of 

mars. It was a little too mucky to get any good detail, but it was a start. 
 

As conditions worsened, I screwed on a moon filter and went exploring the moon for a bit. The little bit of details around the edges I’d never seen before were very cool to see, so I’m expecting as it wanes those views will only get better. Hopefully I’ll get a few more clear nights before the nighttime temps get too low. 
 

tl/dr: I saw Mars and the moon last night. grin.gif

Your new and fresh impressions keep us old guys energized - can't wait to read more of your adventures waytogo.gif !!

 

(and now I know what "tl/dr" means ... lol.gif )


Edited by chrysalis, 11 November 2022 - 09:45 AM.

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#467 Migwan

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 09:53 AM

Out last night early, graced again by the presence of my better half.  It being only 19:30 and 67° out, how could she say no.

 

CSC gave seeing as poor and there was clouds/haze slowly approaching from the northwest.  Had the 80ED out & got a P/S of 5/10 before Deb showed.   

 

Despite the bad seeing, the 80 did quite well on Saturn and with some patience, 133x was quite usable.  Saturn showed the usual A-C rings, Cassini division, one northern band & the shadow cast on the planet.  I was able to see Titan & Rhea in direct vision & Tethys in averted.   Deb only managed Titan.

 

Jupiter was still over the city and the otherwise poor seeing being was made somewhat worse.  Not as sharp on the edges as was seen on Saturn.   Still, with a little patience, 133x was usable.   We both could see the equatorial belts, one belt above them and two thin belts, one each, below each equatorial belt.  At times I could see some sort of extension below the NEB, but Deb couldn't see it. 

 

I tried the Badder Contrast Booster on both planets, but found it did not improve either view.  I'm not sure if this change was due to the poor seeing or the small aperture, but it came as quite a surprise considering the improvement seen on the last two sessions.  

 

With that, a the clouds and haze ended the session.   Clear skies.


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#468 Migwan

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 10:03 AM

My scope is just a few days old and I’m just cracking into a lot of things with it, so pretty much everything is still new to me, which means I’ll likely be posting a lot of mundane stuff (to you guys) here for awhile. lol.gif

 

First off, let’s get the aggravation part out of the way - my idiot neighbors like to randomly slap their flood lights on for no apparent reason. And of course they point directly at my patio where it’s most convenient for me to set up (right outside the door, table is handy for holding stuff). And for some reason they always pick about 5 minutes after I get set up to turn it on. .....

 

tl/dr: I saw Mars and the moon last night. grin.gif

Congrats on the new scope.  Don't think you have to worry about being "mundane".  

 

You might try inviting the neighbors out to have a look sometime.  Hopefully, those lights won't be so much a problem after that. 

 

Enjoy
 


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#469 BrentKnight

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 11:36 AM

I have backdoor neighbors who have those bright down pointing lights in the eaves to light up the outside walls.  We tried talking with them, but they are not interested - so I don't observe in the back yard.  We have neighbors across the street who occasionally leave their driveway floods on.  I send them a text and they happily turn them off when they are done with whatever they were doing.  Hopefully your neighbor is like my across the street neighbor.

 

If not, I've found something like this works really well to block lights coming from a single direction.

 

20221107_084730.jpg

 

 


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#470 Studly

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 12:52 PM

I did some lunar imaging the other night (11/9), mainly to explore detail and contrast levels between several color filters when used on the Moon. I used the Orion ST120 with a 0.5x focal reducer to fit the globe into a single frame. The Moon was waning, but still about 98% illuminated.

 

First took reference footage in integrated (white) light

Footage using Wratten # 47 (Violet)

Footage using Wratten #15 (Deep Yellow)

Footage using Wratten #56 (Light Green)

 

Hands down, the best of the lot seemed to be while using the #56. The filter really accentuated contrast differences between features.

 

The gallery of four images is here:

 

Comments are welcome!

 

Tony


Edited by Studly, 11 November 2022 - 12:54 PM.

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#471 BrentKnight

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 04:31 PM

I kinda like the violet ones.  Green seems to have overexposed the highlights.  The left edge of the moon, Tyco crater and a bright spot on the bottom edge show more details.


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#472 Studly

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 04:44 PM

I kinda like the violet ones.  Green seems to have overexposed the highlights.  The left edge of the moon, Tyco crater and a bright spot on the bottom edge show more details.

Thanks for the comment.

 

Part of this could also be the adjustment in exposure time for different colors, since this had to be adjusted for each capture. I may have inadvertently overexposed the Green capture a little bit.

 

Tony


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#473 BFaucett

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Posted 11 November 2022 - 09:11 PM

Nov 11, 2022 ; Approx 1:00 - 1:45 a.m. CST

The Moon was about 92% illuminated (waning gibbous)
Binoculars: Nikon Action EX 8x40 (FOV 8.2°) and Nikon Aculon 7x50 (FOV 6.4°)
  
I stepped out on my patio about 1:00 AM and noticed that the sky was clear. I hadn't done any binocular observing in quite some time so I decided to grab a couple of my binoculars and take a look around.
  
I quickly noticed that the Moon and Mars were only a view degress apart. They both fit in the field of view of my Nikon Aculon 7x50 binoculars. It was nice seeing them together in the same field of view. I also spent a few minutes going back and forth between Mars and Betelgeuse comparing their color.
   
After enjoying the view of the Moon and Mars, I took a little tour of some of my favorite targets; first with the 7x50 binos and then with the 8x40 binos.
   
Orion Nebula (Messier 42)
Coal Car Cluster (Collinder 73, NGC 1981; it's near M42)
Orion's Belt and cluster (Collinder 70)
The Hyades (Collinder 50, Melotte 25)
The Pleiades (Messier 45)
   
So, that's about it. A brief report but an enjoyable binocular observing session. I need to use my binoculars more often. watching.gif

 

 

obsrv-Nov-11-2022 0100 - adj.jpg

Screenshot from the Stellarium program. 

 

Some CN links that may be of interest:
  

"The Coal Car Cluster"
Started by Sofee12, Feb 19 2022
https://www.cloudyni...al-car-cluster/
  
THE COLLINDER CATALOG OF OPEN STAR CLUSTERS
An Observer’s Checklist
Edited by Thomas Watson
Oct 10 2010 | desertstars
https://www.cloudyni...g-updated-r2467
    

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif


Edited by BFaucett, 11 November 2022 - 09:21 PM.

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#474 BrentKnight

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Posted 12 November 2022 - 03:11 PM

November 11, 2022 | 10:00 - 12:00pm | AT102ED with 8mm Ethos, TeleVue 3-6mm zoom and AT XWA 4.8mm, Celestron 25x100

 

Finished up the Astronomical League Lunar Program using the AT102ED and my 25x100 Celestron's mounted on my new UBM p-gram.  The last Lunar features observed were:

 

Eratosthenes

Rima Hyginus

Vallis Schroteri

Vallis Alpes

Rupes Recta (Very difficult given the current phase.  Basically just a slightly brighter line on the dark Mare)

Billy

J. Herschel (Also very difficult.  A very large, but shallow crater right on the edge of the moon.  I viewed this one twice, but both times were at less than optimal times)

Reiner Gamma

 

Most of these I've never seen before, but they were well worth the hunt to find them.  Now I have the Lunar II and the Lunar Evolution programs to complete.

 

I also got a look at the planets - also with the refractor and the binoculars.

 

Jupiter showed all 4 moons in two groups of two on either side of the planet.  An interesting arrangement.

 

Saturn and the moons Titan, Iapetus, Rhea where seen in the AT102ED.  Iapetus is often much dimmer and not viewable in just a 4", but tonight it's bright side was facing us and it was pretty easy.  With the binoculars I could pick out the rings and a little separation, along with Titan.

 

Mars showed some bright and dark features, but I did not attempt to track down what it was I was seeing.

 

20221112_115833.jpg

The Celestron 25x100's mounted on the Farpoint UBM with Bino-Bandits attached to keep out the glare from surrounding streetlights.

 

I've always complained that the full moon was not good for any observations - except possibly the ray structures.  I was wrong though.  These binoculars in the p-gram make Luna look like a 3-D orb floating in space.  Beautiful image and I just stared at it for 30 minutes...


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#475 Moonlit

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Posted 12 November 2022 - 05:22 PM

Like Brent, I ended up staring a lot at the moon tonight as well :)

Hadn't planned on anything specific but I wanted to try the NGC 869 region, the C3 galaxy and C33/Veil nebula.

Here in Norway the seeing was as bad as I've experienced so far with severe boiling! Clouds like veil came and went so I didn't have much hope.

 

I always look at Jupiter and it looked a bit pale which was the sheer clouds I guess. The seeing was so bad I could hardly make out the two major bands except in a few moments.

 

C3 and C33 both were duds as the moon rose before I got to them, saw nothing.

 

So I spent some time on the Moon near the terminator and the boiling made it more interesting, at least. 

I realized I want to know the geography of the Moon more - perhaps I'll go for one of the many lists of features to explore in the future.
 

Needed some snapchat content so I filmed the boiling of the moon while panning the mount: https://youtube.com/...h?v=HwK06-5uS6g


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