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Observation log continued; IV

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#1501 Astroman007

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Posted 02 April 2024 - 12:25 PM

Finally spotted comet 12P / Pons-Brooks late last evening once the clouds vacated the west, just to the left of and in a horizontal line with Hamal. First picked up in my 10x50s, the tail...pointing straight up...was very obvious. Slightly fan shaped and brighter along the edges, remnants of the feature giving the comet its nickname. I hurried my Questar down to the river's edge that affords me my only down-to-the-horizon view of the west and trained it on the comet, star hopping off Hamal (a lovely deep orange color and sharp as a tack, slightly scintillating in shades ranging from yellow to reddish). I found my best view came at low power (25mm TV Plossl without barlow giving 52x). With the barlow in place the image degraded somewhat due to the low altitude and a passing band of cloud but some slight detail in the head was detectable. Watched transfixed for nearly an hour until the comet was swallowed by the tree crowned hills.

If tonight does not turn out to be clear this will be my last view of Pons-Brooks before I leave for a month of work, and perhaps my last view ever considering the 71 year period. Truly a moment to remember.


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#1502 chrysalis

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Posted 02 April 2024 - 03:19 PM

Hello I am in the province of Quebec not far away from Montréal.

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#1503 BrentKnight

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Posted 04 April 2024 - 10:13 PM

I heard that 12P/Pons-Brooks was having a brightness burst.  I just assumed it would be below the treeline in my front yard, but I thought I'd take my Oberwerk 15x70's out and just see if I could catch it.  It was almost perfectly placed just a little below Jupiter (very easy to see) and just above the trees and the stupid streetlight just down the road.  Even so...I had no trouble at all picking the rather large fuzzy ball out from the background.  With a little averted vision I could just make out a nice stretch of tail.  I figured I maybe had 10 minutes before it set and so I quickly grabbed my C8 and pointed in the general direction with the 28mm UWA.  Really...not much better view, and no tail seen.  A little more detail in the head though.  I will try again tomorrow night and I'll get out a little earlier (and maybe try the 80mm EAA rig on it).


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#1504 daveb2022

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Posted 05 April 2024 - 04:11 AM

April 1 2024

Home/Urban backyard sky
C-9.25/NP-101
5, 13 & 16mm Nagler’s, 40mm TV plossl/685nm IR Pass filter, 32mm TV plossl/610nm Long Pass filter, 12mm Radian/610nm long pass filter.
Nexus DSC/AZ-100/uni-18 push-to type mount
Seestar S-50

 

2024-4-2 925-101 RS.jpg

 

 

Great weather and exceptional conditions finally all came together. The sky was totally clear and the transparency was above average. The day was warm with a 77F high. By 9PM the temps dropped to 61F and 49F at 4 AM when I shut down.

 

This was the first time in several months where I had both above-average seeing, and transparency, plus a higher level of darkness in one night.

 

The SQM readings were also better than normal and read 18.50 at 9 (PM). M-45 was lower in the west and slightly difficult to make out, but still visible.

 

Megrez in UMa was closer to zenith and was barely detectable, but I have a lot of neighborhood light beaming in from all directions and never dark adapt like I should.

 

 

When setting up my little Seestar, I need to watch out for light coming through the fence pickets. Overall, it was a night where it FELT like it was dark, even with every patio in the neighborhood lit up.

 

 

With my main scope, it is nice to have a manageable medium sized aperture again. My fork mounts are just too heavy for my back these days. The 9.25 OTA is as light as my dob base and the alt/az configuration of the AZ100 is much more forgiving compared to the dob. I’m enjoying this new rig.

 

 

I did a few side-by-side observations using both scopes outfitted with standard and night vision EPs. The star counts were rough, but gave me an idea of how each scope handles the light pollution at home.

 

 

I guess a star count isn’t very professional. Each night can be different, and the light pollution is different at different angles. I take averages at zenith for my measurements, but if I point to lower horizons, the sky quality meter can produce very low numbers (brighter skies).

And while I used filters on the NV intensifier, I didn’t use any light pollution filters during my standard observations.

 

 

First up was Jupiter and Uranus, and they were almost out of sight as dusk set in. Both are basically gone for the season.

 

M-42 showed how good the seeing was. All 6 of the trapezium were continually visible in the 9.25/13mm combo.

 

As mentioned, at about 9 PM, the SQM reading was 18.52. That is slightly better than most (good) nights at home.

 

 

 

NGC-1342 is a 6.7 mag open cluster in Perseus. With the 9.25 and a 16mm EP, I counted about 25 stars. With the 101 and a 5mm EP, I got 18 in the same area.
When I dropped in the NVD with a 12mm EP, the 101 produced around a 38-star count. With the 9.25 and a 40mm EP, I counted about 68 stars.

NGC-1664 is a 7.5 mag open cluster in Auriga that looks like a kite. The stars in the asterism have always been one of my favorites. I only counted the stars that outline the kite, and not the outer surrounding areas. 

Boy did the refractor with regular EP’s get slapped by LP. The 5mm Nagler produced 12 stars and the kite shape wasn’t highly visible. The 9.25/16 Nagler combo started to show the kite pattern with 23 stars visible.

I was surprised the 101 with the NVD/12mm EP only showed 26 stars. However, the 9.25 and the NVD/40mm EP star count ended up around 60.

 

 

 

I hit a few brighter galaxies to do some comparing.

 

 

M-82 in UMa was interesting. The 4” refractor required me to move the OTA to be able to see the galaxy.
With the 9.25 SCT, the galaxy was obvious as a long thin haze. Using a NVD in the 101, the galaxy was much brighter than the SCT could produce.
With the NVD in the 9.25…wow, the galaxy showed some structure and more resembled what a short Seestar image produces. I had similar results with M-81.

 

 

NGC-2281 is an open cluster in Auriga. I counted (27) stars in the 9.25+NVD and (19) w/o NV. The count in the refractor with NV was (18) but I still counted (12) with the 5mm EP. It’s a pretty bright cluster.

 

 

NGC-2192 was another open cluster in Auriga but this one is dim. The 9.25 produced about (20) stars in a very small dim haze.
Using NV in the 101, I could not see individual stars but the cluster appeared as a hazy patch. Without NV, even the 9.25 only showed the cluster as a dim patch on the edge of detection.
Trying the 101 with regular EP’s was a futile attempt.

 

 


NGC-2126 in Auriga was a triangular group with a single bright star. I counted (38) 9.25+NVD, (22) 101+NVD, (12) 9.25/16 Nagler, and only (4) stars visible with the 101/5mm Nagler.

 

The 9.25 showed me a target I haven’t seen in several years. NGC-2419 in Lynx (shown in the image below) is a dim globular cluster. It is an elusive object with the 101/NVD, but the 9.25 SCT showed the globular clearly as a uniform round haze.
After finding it in the SCT, I went over to the refractor and it was visible after I knew where to look. Also, I was using a lower power 12mm EP in the 101. An 8mm would have been more in line for something that looked like a dim galaxy. 

 

 

 

The rest of the night logged about 15 galaxies in Ursa Major using NV in the SCT.

 

 

 

My last observations were all just quick views of a few premium objects.

I was wanting to get to bed before the sun came up, so I quickly checked out M-94, M-63, M-106, M-109 and M-51.

M-51 stopped me in my tracks. I was seeing spiral structure in both sections and the connecting link. It was the best observation I’ve had of this galaxy in a few years and never from a light polluted site like mine.
I spent 15 minutes just lookin. Made me wonder what I’d be able to do at a darker spot.

 

 

 

The Seestar was pounding away all night long. At least with using night vision most of the time, operating the Seestar app on my tablet doesn’t bother my eyes much. Got a couple OK images. It is fun to use IMO. Any questionable object I have issues seeing, I can take a quick image to help identify something like a dim cluster or galaxy.

 

seestar.JPG

 

all three.JPG


Edited by daveb2022, 05 April 2024 - 04:55 AM.

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#1505 daveb2022

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Posted 05 April 2024 - 04:11 AM

On April 2nd, I had another clear night and set up the same equipment.

C-9.25/NP-101
5, 13 & 16mm Nagler’s, 40mm TV plossl/685nm IR Pass filter, 32mm TV plossl/610nm Long Pass filter, 12mm Radian/610nm long pass filter.
Nexus DSC/AZ-100/uni-18 push-to type mount
Seestar S-50

 

Seeing and transparency very good and above average.

 

 

One thing I noticed right off the bat was how tired I was. Even with a short nap prior to my observing session, the night before and lack of sleep hit me hard.

 

The sky didn’t seem as dark visually, but nothing I’d consider compromised from a rural spot. The Sky Quality Meter confirmed the brighter sky. At 9 (PM) a zenith reading was 18.31. Temps ranged from 70 degrees at 8 PM to 53 at 4 AM when I pulled everything down.

 

For the heck of it, I viewed M-42 during the bright dusk using the SCT and 16 Nagler. Rigel was barely visible and the SQM read 13.45. Both “E” & “F” were visible confirming the better than average conditions.

 

 

I shot over the M-35 with the SCT after setting up the Seestar for the imaging half. It was still not as dark as early as it was, but M-35 was exceptional in the SCT.
I had to use my 31 Nagler to get a wide enough view though and with such a low power EP, light pollution takes a toll. NGC-2158 was not visible…and I didn’t expect it. The rest of the night was a NV.

 

M-35.jpg

 

M-35 in my Seestar appears as a tornado with NGC-2158 the dust cloud touching ground, NGC-2678 in the middle and finally NGC-2682 (M-35) as the main group.

 

I skipped around a bit. M-50 in Monoceros is always a nice highly populated and bright open cluster. I also picked up a few more in Mon…NGC-2236, and NGC-2251. I also observedNGC-2266, an open cluster in Gemini.

 

By 11PM, the SQM reading was 18.48 and more in line with last nights readings. I jumped over to M-65, 66 and the hamburger galaxy NGC-3628. The refractor did show M-65 & 66 in the same FOV using my 5mm EP, but the hamburger galaxy was basically invisible. I added the night vision intensifier to the refractor, and all three were visible. The 9.25 and NVD was much more effective on all the galaxies including the hamburger galaxy, but they were still mostly smudges.

 

After bobbing around half awake, I had to get some caffeine in me. I was dozing on and off which makes me feel disconnected a bit. Helped to get up and walk around.

 

Getting back to the scope, I continued chasing smudges. NGC-2683 in Lyn, then jumped to Ursa Major NGC-2681, 2768, 2841, 2976, 2985, 3077, 3184, 3198, & NGC-3339.

 

 

While around UMa, M-108 was obvious but the Owl Nebula (M-97) was not visible. I decided to image both with the Seestar.

 

 

NGC-2655 in Cam was easy. NGC-2775 in Cnc was visible, but low in the west. Around the lion, NGC-2903 in Leo was a large bright galaxy but NGC-3198 was dim.

 

 

NGC-3344 in LMi was an easy 9.7 mag galaxy.

 

 

I finished off the night with a few of the major globular clusters. M-3, M-5, M-92, and M-13 didn’t disappoint. I even snuck in M-100.
Finally, the caffeine kicked in as I was tearing down the equipment…still a fun night.

 

AB.JPG

 

CD.JPG


Edited by daveb2022, 05 April 2024 - 04:47 AM.

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#1506 desertstars

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Posted 08 April 2024 - 08:22 PM

Observations made on 3 April 2025
200mm Newtonian reflector of a Celestron AVX mount.
Orion Stratus eyepieces: 17mm (59x), 8mm (125x), 5mm (200x), 3.5mm (286x)

 

Life got in the way of timely posting, but here I am at last. For a second time in a little over a week, the Newt and I were out under the suburban sky, looking up. It was a cool evening, 66°F (18.9°C) with the gentlest of intermittent breezes. To the naked eye, the sky appeared quite steady, with only the merest sparkle to the brighter stars. Transparency seemed as close to perfect as it ever gets.

 

The list tonight was a mix of open star clusters and double stars drawn from Karkoschka’s Observer’s Sky Atlas. I had my best luck with the double stars, but I was chasing clusters down into the northwest – most of them being in Monoceros – not the best part of my sky. The first was NGC 2335. The suburban sky conditions didn’t do this cluster any favors, and it’s now on my list of targets to re-observe someday from a darker location. It was a fairly loose collection of a few fairly faint stars, only four of which really stood out. There was a sense of stars in the background that didn’t quite come through the skyglow. Of the nebula associated with this cluster, not a trace could be seen with any filter. With anything more powerful than the 17mm eyepiece, the sense that this was a star cluster was lost.

 

NGC 2286 Stood out better as a star cluster. Also a very loose collection, and fairly sparse, I saw (again through the 17mm) about a dozen fairly faint stars. Two of the brighter stars were arranged in a way that suggested a binary pair. A check of Carte du Ciel shows SKF 1341 in about the right place.

 

Working with Karkoschka’s atlas has me revisiting sight not seen in a number of years. The first of these tonight was Messier 50. Once again, I stayed with the 17mm eyepiece. M50 stood out from the skyglow more clearly than the previous clusters, but was still a concentration of relatively faint stars that struggled through the suburban glow. This cluster, along with all the others attempted tonight, would have been easier earlier in the season, when they were closer to culmination at the times I general observe. But the weather this winter the weather pretty much shut down the sky for me, and I was trying catch a few things before losing them for the season.

 

Even knowing this, I decided to move on down my list to NGC 2301. This was a much more impressive object. Another loose collection, but of brighter stars, that sent chains of stars out in several direction. Three of these star chains were easily visible, each a mix of brighter and fainter stars. This cluster, too, had a couple of stars that appeared to form a close binary; one of the pair was a rich golden color, the other faintly blue-ish. The color contrast was what made them pop out at me. (The stars around them were pale white.) A later check showed this pair to be HJ 470AB (sep. 21”, with magnitudes 8.2 and 9.1).

 

Speaking of revisiting objects, the next four star clusters fit that category. Messier 38 was the first, giving me a familiar sight of many faint stars gathered together in a fairly small space. Auriga was fairly low in the west-northwest when I got there, but that’s a darker patch of sky, and so I was able to get a pretty good look at this one. The same for Messier 36, with its smaller number of brighter stars, flung out from the center in short chains. Messier 37 the the most concentrated of the three, with lots of fairly faint stars, with one fairly bright star its heart.

 

Messier 48 was fairly high in the south, right where I wish I could have observed the clusters in Monoceros. It’s a wide cluster of fairly bright stars arranged in pairs and triplets, and in a few spots, short chains. It came close to filling the FOV of the 17mm. Three of the brighter members had a faintly golden shine to them. Easily the most appealing star cluster of the night.

 

From there I visited the first double star of the night, 27 Hydrae (SHJ 105AB: sep. 229.1”, mags. 4.9 and 7.0). No challenge splitting this pair, that’s for sure. It would be better appreciated in the 10x50 binocular, and will surely be re-observed some night using that glasss. Not that it wasn’t a pleasing sight in the 17mm eyepiece. In addition to its obvious magnitude contrast, it displayed nice colors. The primary star was a clear yellow color, with a cool blue, distant companion.

 

I’ve observed the AC components of zeta Cancri (STF AB,C). Tonight, the good seeing encouraged me to try the AB pair, with its 1.1” separation. But not even the 3.5mm eyepiece could manage it. The best I could do was be sure that the brighter of the two easily visible stars was in fact two stars, so close they touched. A cosmic peanut, without so much as a trace of black between them. I’ll try again another night.

 

I revisited Messier 35 in Gemini for the first time in years. The cluster is composed of a number of stars of varying magnitudes, and put on a pretty good display in my suburban skies. One of the brightest stars, to one side, had a distinctly reddish hue that stood out from the rest of the pallid collection. M35 showed nicely, but of its more distant neighbor, NGC 2158, nothing was seen.

 

Messier 67 looked good in the 17mm eyepiece. It’s a fairly dense concentration of mostly fainter stars, nothing as glittery as its nearby neighbor (M44). With one exception. There a gold-tinted star well away from the center of the cluster. On the CDC the star HD75700 seems to occupy the correct position.

 

35 Sextantis (STF 1466AB: sep. 6.8”, mags. 6.2 and 7.1) was next. It could be resolved with the 17mm, but just barely. The best view of this duo came with the 5mm eyepiece, revealing an easily visible contrast in magnitude between the components and nice colors. The brighter component was a pure golden yellow, while its companion was ashen blue. Very pretty.

 

And then there was 35 Comae Berenices (STF 1687AB). I’ve observed STS 1687AC a number of times, without ever resolving STF 1687AB, with it 1.2” separation. Even though I failed to succeed with zeta Cancri, I gave this one a try all the same. With essentially the same results.

 

I was coming to the end of the night’s list, as well as my energy levels. I paid my respects to zeta and 80 Ursae Majoris, the well known Mizar and Alcor, the naked eye double that, along with Cor Corali, brought double star observing to my attention as a teenager. Mizar is, of course, a binary in its own right, and I once again gazed upon its diamond white companions. In the 17mm, Alcor easily fits in the FOV. It has a warmer white hue, not quite grading into yellow. Old friends, these.

 

Xi Ursae Majoris (STF 1523AB: sep. 1.8”, mags. 4.3 and 4.8) was supposed to be the last target on the list, but ended up penultimate instead. As such a tight double, I didn’t expect much in the way of results, under tonight’s conditions. I went straight to the 3.5mm eyepiece to try my luck, and was quite surprise to succeed. There was the merest trace of black between the bright white components, but it held steady the entire time I looked. The difference similar magnitudes and 6” can make!

 

That result led to giving gamma Virginis – the notorious Porrima – (STF 1670: sep. 2.3”, mags. 3.5 and 3.5) a try. Compared to the other close binaries tonight, Porrima wasn’t much of a challenge, as it turned out. A beautiful, tight pair of bright white stars, twin diamonds in the sky. Always a fine sight, and not a bad way to call it a night.


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#1507 wxcloud

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Posted 08 April 2024 - 11:06 PM

April 8th: the partial solar eclipse...

... through a sheet of clouds. I had intended on a mostly visual session with some potential imaging as an afterthought, but I ended up with a shot in mind which trying to get the rig set up and figured out (oh yeah, this was a pretty much last minute thought...) Right till about the mid point of the eclipse, after that shot, I focused back on visual for the last half of things.

Glad I did. Naturally I gravitated to the LUNT ls50tha double stacked and 7mm Pentax XW. As the opaque night side of the moon receded from the solar disc, more details of the chromosphere popped into view. Really interesting seeing filaments spring into view that where covered by the moon a short time prior. Numerous filaments strewn about the sun today as well as a couple interesting prominences. I spent probably about an hour as the moon slowly slid away eventually seeing last contact leaving the glowing ball of plasma in it's wake and me just soaking in the view.

I happened to be outside trying my hand at imaging, and while I was somewhat focused at the time trying to grab some frames (I made some errors trying to image) I did take notice of a couple other things as it reached peak, the eerie darkening as the moon blocked out perhaps 65% of the sun (not sure how total it was here, perhaps about 70%?) Also felt the temperature drop a few degrees. Thought I heard an owl shortly after peak.

This was my first h-alpha telescopic view of a solar eclipse. While it didn't reach totality here, it did impress totally. Even viewing through a sheet of clouds.

I also did managed to get a somewhat decent image of a shot I had in mine, though it had a few issues, the experience and views through the eyepiece makes up for it.

What a grand sight and experience for what it was :)
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#1508 daveb2022

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Posted 09 April 2024 - 03:12 PM

Well a few pics from yesterday morning. The Ha scope was showing a couple huge solar prominence's ejecting into space. Also a few pics of sunspots.

 

2024-4-8 solar equipment.JPG

 

 

E-1.JPG


Edited by daveb2022, 09 April 2024 - 03:14 PM.

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#1509 Migwan

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Posted 09 April 2024 - 07:14 PM

4/7&8/24;  Two days of heaven, I mean clear warm skies. 

 

We watched sunspots on both Sunday and Monday.  It has been since the 2080, that I had looked at those. 

 

On Sunday we could make out 7 in one group near the center and 4 more off to the upper edge.   The 7 was comprised of 4 larger ones shaped in a short curving structure that could just be resolved one from another.  At the narrower end were 3 very small ones that formed a tail slanted back against the curve.  At 25x the 3 small ones looked like a line.  At 67x they resolved.  

 

We had considered driving down to totality (3hr), but then decided to have an impromptu eclipse party instead.   Before the eclipse we had a look at the same sunspots in daveb2022's picture.   At 67-100x we saw 4 distinct sunspots in the larger group, much clearer than shown in daveb2022's last picture.   Seeing was forecast at 4/5 and lived up to it.

 

Here, the sun approached the larger group of sunspots from the upper left and swallowed them first.  About one beer down, the moon swallowed the other two, just a little awhile before the max was reached at 94%.    Not sure who, but someone played "Ride With Me" by Steppenwolf at that moment.  Knowing me, I probably would have chosen something by Joe Walsh, but what-the-hey.   Some how "Ride With Me" really worked.

 

 So anyway, this is the smallest magnified aperture I've ever used.    Just had an extra pair of eclipse glasses and too much time.   Did the ST80, too.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • sunfilter.jpg

Edited by Migwan, 09 April 2024 - 07:19 PM.

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#1510 weis14

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Posted 09 April 2024 - 08:07 PM

I'm not much of a solar observer, but I was not going to miss the total solar eclipse.  Thus, I loaded up my family (wife and two kids, niece, my mother and my 80 year old grandmother) and drove down to Bloomington, Indiana where I went to grad/law school to observe.  It couldn't have gone better!  The kids (3, 5 and 6 years old) behaved well in the car, traffic was a non-issue (we arrived the day before and left earlier today) and even the light clouds were mostly gone for totality.  

 

I took a scope and my SeeStar, but focused mostly on visual observing and having fun.  Below is a writeup of the day that I put in my astronomy log.  It has more personal details than normal, but the event is so personal that it makes sense in a way.

 

Scope: FS-60CB, 60mm refractor w/ solar filter
Mount: Sightron Alt-Az mount

Eyepieces: 14mm Delos (25x, 3 degree FOV)
Observing Site: Will Detmer Park, Bloomington, Indiana
Conditions: 75F, sunny, intermittent, thin high level clouds 

 

We arrived at the park around 10am and there were only a few people there.  We scouted the park the day before and I was able to park in the spot I chose the day before and setup in my preferred location.  I set up the chairs, table and several other items to hold our spot, while the kids played on the playground a few hundred feet away.  Once everything was setup, I assembled the FS-60 and decided that I liked the wider FOV without the Q module and also got the SeeStar setup and tracking the Sun.  Around 11:45, my mom and grandmother cooked lunch for the group (bratwurst) on our camping stove.  After eating and cleaning up, we broke out the eclipse glasses and got ready for the partial phase, which started at 1:49pm local time.

 

By this point, there were roughly 100 people at the park, which was not much given its size.  A group was set up next to us with several cameras and a couple of other scopes (all with cameras) were also there.  As the person with the only 100% visual telescope setup in the park, I was doing a lot of informal outreach all through the event.  I enjoyed it, and people continued to look throughout the partial phase.

 

I was looking through the scope an captured first contact.  It was also immediately visible in the SeeStar, but I didn't snap any photos until a few minutes later.  Our group mostly viewed through regular eclipse glasses and the kids enjoyed the feed from the SeeStar on my phone.  The adults occasionally looked through the scope and outreach continued.  My three year old did great with his glasses and kept shouting, "The sun [has] a chunk missing!"

 

About 20 minutes before totality, we started to notice a slight drop in the temperature and a slight breeze.  This was followed by a change in the color tone of the surroundings.  Even a day later, I've had a hard time figuring out how to describe it.  Things not only got darker, they appeared to almost have a slightly sepia hue.  Others in my group described it as looking through a pair of very dark polarized sunglasses.  Things were still in color, but different.  At totality, some insects in the pond began chirping and the songs of various birds changed.  

 

Totality came suddenly and was met with shouts and gasps from everyone.  I immediately removed the solar filters and took a 20 second look in the FS-60.  The corona was magnificent and exceeded the 3 degree FOV of the eyepiece with a lot of grain lines in it.  Pink flares were visible all around with two spectacular ones at the south and west sides of the sun.  I allowed the other adults to each have 15 seconds (I furiously took pictures with the SeeStar during this time, just with default settings) and then I observed for another minute.  The rest of totality I observed without optical aid.  Jupiter and Venus were brightly visible and one of the eclipse flights flew over as well.  I saw the diamond ring and put both filters back on the scopes without trying to capture it.  

 

Everyone agreed that it was an amazing experience and the observers next to us couldn't quit talking about it.  The partial phase seemed to go a lot quicker the second time (in actuality the shadow was moving quicker as the eclipse progressed) and we took everything down and headed off to find dinner and ice cream.  Things weren't crowded and after a steak, celebratory drink and ice cream cone, we went back to the hotel, cleaned up and crashed.

 

I told the kids that in 2045, they are taking us!


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#1511 daveb2022

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Posted 09 April 2024 - 09:59 PM


About 20 minutes before totality, we started to notice a slight drop in the temperature and a slight breeze.  This was followed by a change in the color tone of the surroundings.  Even a day later, I've had a hard time figuring out how to describe it.  Things not only got darker, they appeared to almost have a slightly sepia hue.  Others in my group described it as looking through a pair of very dark polarized sunglasses.  Things were still in color, but different.  At totality, some insects in the pond began chirping and the songs of various birds changed.  

 

Totality came suddenly and was met with shouts and gasps from everyone.

How did the pics come out? I would have loved to see this event from the zone of totality.

 

I never thought about having to pull the solar filter off the Seestar during the peak. That adds some unwanted complexity. I would be wanting to note everything around me during the main feature. Did you use the time lapse feature?



#1512 weis14

weis14

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Posted 09 April 2024 - 10:56 PM

How did the pics come out? I would have loved to see this event from the zone of totality.

 

I never thought about having to pull the solar filter off the Seestar during the peak. That adds some unwanted complexity. I would be wanting to note everything around me during the main feature. Did you use the time lapse feature?

I'll have to get pics of the surroundings from one of the others.  I had the SeeStar connected to my phone.  I just literally popped the lens off.  It took 3 seconds.  I let the SeeStar adjust automatically and it was okay.  There are plenty of better pics, but far worse ones too.  I did not use the time lapse feature.  Just randomly captured images when I thought to.

 

The SeeStar's main function was to give the younger kids a safe way to see a larger image in case they wouldn't wear the glasses for some reason.  It turned out to be completely unnecessary since they used glasses well and for the first time ever, they didn't want to look at a phone.  Here are a few of the pics, including one with a very enthusiastic three year old looking at the partial phase.

 

Eclipse 1.jpg

 

Eclipse 2.jpg

 

Eclipse 3.jpg

 

Eclipse 4.jpg

 

Eclipse 5.jpg

 

Eclipse 7.jpg

 

Peter 1.jpg


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#1513 Migwan

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Posted 10 April 2024 - 11:26 AM

Excellent account and photos Ryan.   Last one especially.smile.gif

 

Need to correct myself, yet again.  CS seeing on Monday was not 4/5.   More like 2/5.   Confused myself with transparency.   So evidently it the sharpness must have all been on the 1x1.5" aperture.

 

Just had a look today and the west central the larger mass has three clear spots in an very open v shape.   Its followed by a mass that looks like Mickey Mouse with uneven sized ears that I could not resolve into three @67x.  Three small ones can be seen following that.  

 

Though today's visions of the sunspots still seem sharper than the above pictures, they seem just slightly more diffuse than yesterday.   This seems to match something noticed in the 2017 eclipse while using the 2080.  We saw a number of very small sunspots during the progression of the eclipse, than we could see before or after it.    

 

Now the 8" always showed some texture on the surface of the sun, the 1.1.5" film shows no texture.   Pretty much all one color, but almost looking opaque.  


Edited by Migwan, 10 April 2024 - 12:02 PM.

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