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Is there a galaxy or nebular in Octans

Beginner Binoculars Observing
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#1 newbie SA

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Posted 20 September 2022 - 05:40 PM

Hello All
I tried tonight some shots at the tail pf Scorpio. Being in the southern hemisphere my go to star is Sigma/ Delta Octantis. While I was trying to find the Octans I noticed a faint nebular/ galaxy like structure more or less halfway between Beta Octantis and Delta Octantis.   (IF i identified the constellation correctly)
I never noticed anything there before, however I'm also the proud owner of a new pair of Vortex 10x42 binocs now. 
The "corner" stars of Octans where well defined and pinpoint, while this structure was like fuzzy or... galaxy like?
Could anybody tell me what I might have seen there and is it worth photographing with a fullframe DSLR and a 150/210mm lens?
None of the sky maps show anything in that area!



#2 MisterDan

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Posted 20 September 2022 - 07:19 PM

The Small Magellanic Cloud is in the general area (Tucana/Hydrus), but I'm not aware of any nebula or galaxy between Beta & Delta Octantis.  NCG 104 is one of the two brightest globular clusters in our sky, and it's  "next door" to the SMC.  Both can be found roughly midway between Achernar and central Octans.  Just follow the "river" (Eridanus) towards Octans and the South Celestial Pole.

 

NGC 7098 is also in the area (near Nu Octantis), but its visual magnitude is ~11.5.

 

I'd take another look (weather permitting), and see if you can verify location.

 

Best wishes and luck!

Dan


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#3 newbie SA

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Posted 21 September 2022 - 12:35 AM

Thank you Dan
Yes I am aware of the SMC but what I am talking about is more like a very fuzzy star. It has roughly 3 times the "optical" diameter of Beta Octantis. (I know no scientific description, not yet familiar with all the tech lingo ((-:)
I see if I can find it from my area tonight, problem is celestial south is behind some tall trees from my place. Maybe I can get a pic to determine the general area.
As said, thanks again and clear skies. 
 


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#4 KBHornblower

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Posted 21 September 2022 - 10:55 AM

SkySafari shows faint galaxies and other deep sky objects in Octans.  Most of them are much fainter than Beta and Sigma Octantis.  They showed up when I zoomed in to simulate the view in binoculars or a telescope.



#5 newbie SA

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Posted 21 September 2022 - 11:07 AM

Hello hornblower
I think sky safari is the ONE app I do not have. I have distant sun sky walk sky tracker, my fav, and stelarium on the pc.
Will have a look again.
Yes I would say it is fainter than the “main stars of Octans.
We have cloud cover tonight so don’t know how far I get with the obs

#6 newbie SA

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Posted 21 September 2022 - 04:27 PM

I tried to get a clear pic of the "fuzzy" star. I could see clearly the difference of my "mystery" to the brightest star to the right of it, with the binocs. I found it incredibly difficult to see anything on the LCD of the camera. However I mounted a laser on the lens hood and took a pic. Non of them show the laser, but at least I ould direct the lens to the "right " object.
However there is a good possibility it is the one with the arrow. If not that one, the one with circle?  
I If so, the "brightest star to the right, would be sigma octantis. 
I would really like to know what this "object" is as I could confirm clearly the difference to all the others tonight again.

My position is 

34,1' s

18 21' e

the pics where taken roughly at 8pm local time (CAT)with arrowIMGL9434.jpg
 



#7 KBHornblower

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Posted 21 September 2022 - 10:10 PM

Can you give us the image scale of that photo, or perhaps identify some stars?  So far I have been unable to match it to a view in Sky Safari or Stellarium.



#8 newbie SA

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Posted 21 September 2022 - 11:10 PM

Sorry hornblower

this is a 100% image straight from the camera taken with a 300mm lens on a 1,3 crop body if that helps. If it does not rain this evening ill try to align the photo up with the actual sky and a app and see if i can identify at least a few cars and pinpoint the weird one.



#9 starblue

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Posted 29 September 2022 - 02:29 AM

I took your photo into nova.astrometry.net and it says (indirectly) you're not pointed at Octans at all but on the Tucana-Indus border. It's also tilted relative to RA/Dec lines. Results page here (I don't know how long this link stays valid but you can submit the photo yourself to the website if it's gone dead):

 

https://nova.astrome...24936#annotated

Center of FOV: 23h 30m 32.413s, -72° 41' 29.676"

FOV size = 5.48 x 3.66 deg

Orientation: Up is 61.8 degrees E of N

 

According to Sky Safari Pro 6 the brightest galaxy in the FOV is >mag 15.

My guess is that you're looking at the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. I've never seen it but I believe it's the 2nd biggest globular in the sky and therefore should show up bigger than any star. The globular would be off the left side of the photo on the SMC's W side.


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#10 newbie SA

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Posted 29 September 2022 - 10:59 AM

I took your photo into nova.astrometry.net and it says (indirectly) you're not pointed at Octans at all but on the Tucana-Indus border. It's also tilted relative to RA/Dec lines. Results page here (I don't know how long this link stays valid but you can submit the photo yourself to the website if it's gone dead):

 

https://nova.astrome...24936#annotated

Center of FOV: 23h 30m 32.413s, -72° 41' 29.676"

FOV size = 5.48 x 3.66 deg

Orientation: Up is 61.8 degrees E of N

 

According to Sky Safari Pro 6 the brightest galaxy in the FOV is >mag 15.

My guess is that you're looking at the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. I've never seen it but I believe it's the 2nd biggest globular in the sky and therefore should show up bigger than any star. The globular would be off the left side of the photo on the SMC's W side.

Thank you so much Starblue, really appreciated!  
What I do not understand, it should be South, NOT north!  I would say it was slightly west of the celestial south!/!
But maybe I just remember wrong!

 


Edited by newbie SA, 29 September 2022 - 11:55 AM.



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